desembolsadas en un 25%

English translation: 25% paid in

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:desembolsadas en un 25%
English translation:25% paid in
Entered by: Rebecca Jowers

10:36 Feb 25, 2011
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Business/Commerce (general) / Legal/Business
Spanish term or phrase: desembolsadas en un 25%
Las acciones están totalmente suscritas y desembolsadas en un veinticinco por ciento.
This is from the Estatutos, Articles of Association, of a trading company.
The shares are totally subscribed and paid up (?) at 25%/and 25% paid up/ ... covered?
What is the exact concept here?
Justin Peterson
Spain
Local time: 13:55
25% paid in
Explanation:
When shares have been "25% desembolsadas" they are properly said to have been "25% paid IN". "Paid UP" has the meaning of "fully (or) 100% paid" ("100% paid up"). This difference between "paid in" capital and "paid up" capital is underscored in the definitions found in Investopedia (shown below) where it is underscored that "paid UP" should only be used when the shares have been "paid in full" ("100% desembolsadas" rather than "25% desembolsadas"):

What Does Paid In Capital Mean?--The amount of capital "paid in" by investors during common or preferred stock issuances, including the par value of the shares themselves.

What Does Paid-Up Capital Mean?--The total amount of shareholder capital that has been paid in full by shareholders.

Unfortunately, the English translations of the estatutos, annual reports, etc. of dozens of Spanish companies fail to make this distinction between "paid IN" and "paid UP."


Source:
http://www.investopedia.com/terms/p/paidupcapital.asp




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Note added at 4 hrs (2011-02-25 14:45:14 GMT)
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I think the difference between "paid IN" and "paid UP" would apply equally in any circumstances, and not only to the purchase of shares. In that regard the Oxford Advanced Lerner's Dictionary of Current English (OUP, 1974) gives this definition of "to pay up": "to pay in full what is owing. Example: If you don't pay up (i.e., pay in full), I'll take you to court."

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Note added at 8 hrs (2011-02-25 18:46:52 GMT)
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(please note typo above: should read "Learner's")
Selected response from:

Rebecca Jowers
Spain
Local time: 13:55
Grading comment
That sounds right to me. Makes sense. I think paid in or paid up are good.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +225% paid in
Rebecca Jowers
4 +1paid up to 25%
Fiona Kirton


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
"desembolsadas en un 25%"
paid up to 25%


Explanation:
http://www.expatsinspain.org/corporate-law/bankruptcy-insolv...
"The capital must be fully subscribed and paid up to at least a quarter of the nominal value of each share."

Similar questions have been asked before. You might find the answers helpful:
http://www.proz.com/kudoz/spanish_to_english/bus_financial/4...
http://www.proz.com/kudoz/spanish_to_english/law_general/395...

Fiona Kirton
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:55
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 39

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  FVS (X): I would prefer 'as to' 25%.
1 day 40 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
"desembolsadas en un 25%"
25% paid in


Explanation:
When shares have been "25% desembolsadas" they are properly said to have been "25% paid IN". "Paid UP" has the meaning of "fully (or) 100% paid" ("100% paid up"). This difference between "paid in" capital and "paid up" capital is underscored in the definitions found in Investopedia (shown below) where it is underscored that "paid UP" should only be used when the shares have been "paid in full" ("100% desembolsadas" rather than "25% desembolsadas"):

What Does Paid In Capital Mean?--The amount of capital "paid in" by investors during common or preferred stock issuances, including the par value of the shares themselves.

What Does Paid-Up Capital Mean?--The total amount of shareholder capital that has been paid in full by shareholders.

Unfortunately, the English translations of the estatutos, annual reports, etc. of dozens of Spanish companies fail to make this distinction between "paid IN" and "paid UP."


Source:
http://www.investopedia.com/terms/p/paidupcapital.asp




--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2011-02-25 14:45:14 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I think the difference between "paid IN" and "paid UP" would apply equally in any circumstances, and not only to the purchase of shares. In that regard the Oxford Advanced Lerner's Dictionary of Current English (OUP, 1974) gives this definition of "to pay up": "to pay in full what is owing. Example: If you don't pay up (i.e., pay in full), I'll take you to court."

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 hrs (2011-02-25 18:46:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

(please note typo above: should read "Learner's")

Rebecca Jowers
Spain
Local time: 13:55
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 302
Grading comment
That sounds right to me. Makes sense. I think paid in or paid up are good.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  FVS (X): No. See eg. http://www.economynews.us/economy/partly-paid-up-shares-are-... //Your answer is inconsistent with this. If you can say partly paid, why not 25% paid up?
1 hr
  -> Exactly. As your example shows, if you want to use "paid up" in this context you have to say "PARTLY-paid-up", since "paid up" per se means "fully paid"

agree  Ginna Ma
3 hrs
  -> Thanks Ginna

agree  Claudia Luque Bedregal
3 hrs
  -> Gracias Claudia
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