Hacer bóveda con las manos

English translation: steepling fingers

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase: Hacer bóveda con las manos
English translation:steepling fingers
Entered by: patinba

22:12 Jul 24, 2012
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Business/Commerce (general)
Spanish term or phrase: Hacer bóveda con las manos
Esta frase se trata de una descripción del lenguaje corporal de un candidato en una entrevista. Pone que si "hace bóveda" con las manos, el candidato tiene confianza etc., pero no sé cómo se dice en inglés.

Alguna sugerencia por favor?!
Ciaran Quinn
Spain
Local time: 03:54
steepling fingers
Explanation:
I don't think cup or bowl fits because if you are sitting at a desk being interviewed, it is a very unlikely thing to do with your hands. A bóveda is a vault or roof, and I also do not think it can be turned into the opposite (a bowl). However, if you place the fingers of your hands together you can make a vault. I found this ref in a text on body language which would seem more logical, and refers precisely to a confident candidate.

You will steeple your fingers (fingertips together like a church steeple) more often when confident but it will vanish the moment you lack confidence or have insecurities.

· Steepling is important to get your point across that you feel strongly about what you are saying, it is probably the most powerful display of confidence that we possess.
Body Language of the Hands | Psychology Today
www.psychologytoday.com/.../body-language-th... - Traducir esta página
20 Jan 2010 – When things are really stressful, you will rub your hands together with fingers stretched out and interlaced. A behavior we reserve for when ...


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Note added at 1 hr (2012-07-24 23:54:42 GMT)
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A few more refs; steepling seems to be a common term in body language and denotes confidence.

steeple
center-for-nonverbal-studies.org/steeple.htm - Traducir esta página
The simple act of placing the fingertips of either hand together in front of you to form a steeple is a very effective gesture that is rarely offensive and will establish ...
Hand Gestures Part Two
www.reading-body-language.co.uk/gestures2.html - Traducir esta página
Gesture - Steeple. THE STEEPLE. Believed to be a sure sign of confidence this is most commonly used by a seated person and imparts a clear message of ...
The Power Of Nonverbal Communication: How You Act Is More ... - Resultado de la Búsqueda de libros de Google
books.google.com.ar/books?isbn=1563437880...
Henry H. Calero - 2005 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 308 páginas
At other times, you notice the change in confidence by the height at which the steepling gesture is made. Some individuals place their hands so high that, when ...
Confident Hand Gesture
www.simplybodylanguage.com/hand-gesture.html - Traducir esta página
The hand steeple, where the fingers are making a little "roof top", is showing a lot of confidence. This hand gesture is very popular with lawyers, politicians and ...
Selected response from:

patinba
Argentina
Local time: 23:54
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +18steepling fingers
patinba
5 +2To cup their hands
David Ronder
4make / form an arch with their hands
Nick Harding


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
To cup their hands


Explanation:
That's what we say, even if it looks more like a bowl or vault

David Ronder
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:54
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 48

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Rosa Paredes: Had to change this; when you're wrong you're wrong. nevertheless, thank you for this term.
4 mins
  -> Thanks, Rosa / Fair enough, Rosa. I'm not going to cup my hands and beg you to give me back your agree :-)

agree  Yvonne Gallagher
7 mins
  -> Thanks, gallagy2

agree  Christine Walsh
27 mins
  -> Thanks, Christine

agree  Paul García: also in the U. S.
1 hr
  -> Thaks, Paul

neutral  Claudia Reynaud: I now think that patinba's suggestion is more accurate. Sorry! :(
5 hrs
  -> Thanks, Claudia

agree  Gordon Byron: "Cup ones hands" is great, very accurate visually and idiomatic to boot
7 hrs
  -> Thanks, Gordon

disagree  neilmac: Suggests begging, asking for something (cf. beggar's bowl)
9 hrs
  -> You may have a point, Neil, but see my discussion entry
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +18
steepling fingers


Explanation:
I don't think cup or bowl fits because if you are sitting at a desk being interviewed, it is a very unlikely thing to do with your hands. A bóveda is a vault or roof, and I also do not think it can be turned into the opposite (a bowl). However, if you place the fingers of your hands together you can make a vault. I found this ref in a text on body language which would seem more logical, and refers precisely to a confident candidate.

You will steeple your fingers (fingertips together like a church steeple) more often when confident but it will vanish the moment you lack confidence or have insecurities.

· Steepling is important to get your point across that you feel strongly about what you are saying, it is probably the most powerful display of confidence that we possess.
Body Language of the Hands | Psychology Today
www.psychologytoday.com/.../body-language-th... - Traducir esta página
20 Jan 2010 – When things are really stressful, you will rub your hands together with fingers stretched out and interlaced. A behavior we reserve for when ...


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2012-07-24 23:54:42 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

A few more refs; steepling seems to be a common term in body language and denotes confidence.

steeple
center-for-nonverbal-studies.org/steeple.htm - Traducir esta página
The simple act of placing the fingertips of either hand together in front of you to form a steeple is a very effective gesture that is rarely offensive and will establish ...
Hand Gestures Part Two
www.reading-body-language.co.uk/gestures2.html - Traducir esta página
Gesture - Steeple. THE STEEPLE. Believed to be a sure sign of confidence this is most commonly used by a seated person and imparts a clear message of ...
The Power Of Nonverbal Communication: How You Act Is More ... - Resultado de la Búsqueda de libros de Google
books.google.com.ar/books?isbn=1563437880...
Henry H. Calero - 2005 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 308 páginas
At other times, you notice the change in confidence by the height at which the steepling gesture is made. Some individuals place their hands so high that, when ...
Confident Hand Gesture
www.simplybodylanguage.com/hand-gesture.html - Traducir esta página
The hand steeple, where the fingers are making a little "roof top", is showing a lot of confidence. This hand gesture is very popular with lawyers, politicians and ...

patinba
Argentina
Local time: 23:54
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 597
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Charles Davis: So that's what it's called! I agree; there's an important difference between this, which is palms down, and cupping, which I think implies palms up and sounds more like supplication. See also http://www.bodylanguagesuccess.com/2010/10/high-steeple.html
1 hr
  -> Thanks Charles! I learnt that today too!/ Good illustrated ref, too!

agree  David Hollywood: this is dead right :) and fits the context as it has to be positive and not something in supplication as cupping hands would transmit
1 hr
  -> Thanks, David!

agree  Andy Watkinson: The very name suggests this. A "bóveda" is an arched ceiling facing down, not up
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Andy!

agree  Joel Schaefer: Of course! This is confident, and cupping is a begging gesture. Try both gestures yourself and see how you feel :)
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Joel! Cupped hands made me feel like Oliver Twist.

agree  Ian Keith Jones Williams
4 hrs
  -> Thank you!

agree  Ray Flores: You did your homework.
6 hrs
  -> Thanks, Ray!

agree  Claudia Luque Bedregal
6 hrs
  -> Gracias, Claudia!

agree  franglish
6 hrs
  -> Thanks!

agree  Jenni Lukac (X)
7 hrs
  -> Thanks!

agree  Gilla Evans: Or 'arch your hands'. This reminds me of a game we used to play as kids 'here's a church (made with the thumbs) and here's a steeple (made with the little fingers), open it up and here's all the people (the rest of the fingers when you turn hands over)
8 hrs
  -> Indeed! Thanks, Gilla!

agree  neilmac: Also "arched/arching hands". Arched fingers comes up in guitar and piano playing texts too. Gilla's rhyme brings back memories :)
8 hrs
  -> Thanks, neil!

agree  Marian Vieyra: So that's what it's called!
8 hrs
  -> Thanks, Marian!

agree  James A. Walsh: Well, you learn something new every day! Never knew it was called this.
9 hrs
  -> Neither did I, that's the fun of this weapon of mass distraction. Thanks, James!

agree  Yvonne Gallagher: this is better here
10 hrs
  -> Thank you very much, gallagy!

agree  Gordon Byron: You're probably right, nice work! Although another gesture of confidence isfingers joined in the "cupped" position with thumbs touching but I do think your're on the right track so I agree too :-)
12 hrs
  -> Many thanks, Gordon!

agree  Elizabeth Joy Pitt de Morales: Agreed! Excellent!
13 hrs
  -> Thank you, Elizabeth!

agree  Rosa Paredes: It did seem odd to me 'to cup hands'in the context. You're absolutely right!
16 hrs
  -> Thank you very much, Rosa!

agree  Claudia Reynaud
2 days 13 hrs
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20 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
make / form an arch with their hands


Explanation:

This has come up before and has won Kudos points, thank José Quinones who translated from the French: 'faire / former une voûte avec les mains', so I say the English would be to 'make / form an arch with their hands'.

CONFIANZA EN SI MISMO.

From José Quinones, who points us to a photo at the top left of the webpage below:

http://www.azb.be/fr/index.html



Nick Harding
Spain
Local time: 03:54
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
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