síntesis de grado

English translation: licenciatura (academic degree) dissertation seminar

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:síntesis de grado
English translation:licenciatura (academic degree) dissertation seminar
Entered by: RLL2866

18:19 Dec 14, 2016
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Certificates, Diplomas, Licenses, CVs / English pedagogy
Spanish term or phrase: síntesis de grado
I am translating a university transcript of an English pedagogy student from a Chilean university so that he can apply to postgraduate programs in England.

In the student's second to last semester, he has the course "síntesis de grado" (10 credit hours). He said that it was a thesis he did to be "licenciado en educación". However, in the same semester and the following one, there's a course called "seminario de título I" (10 credit hours) and "seminario de título II" (20 credit hours). I originally was going to translate that as dissertation seminar. However, now I'm not so sure, since both sound related to the thesis.

Any suggestions on how to translate síntesis de grado?
RLL2866
Chile
Local time: 18:44
licenciatura (academic degree) dissertation seminar
Explanation:
(For an American readership "thesis" would be more suitable than "dissertation"; the use of these terms is the other way round from British English.)

It does seem confusing that there is a "síntesis de grado" and also a "seminario de título", but the crux of this is that "grado" and "título" are not synonyms. In Chile, as in some other Latin American countries, there is a distinction between the academic degree (licenciatura, or grado) and the professional degree or "title". The former usually involves at least four years of study and requires completing the full academic degree programme. But then in order to practise professionally you need the "título" or "título profesional", which involves a further year or two of study on top of the full academic degree. You usually gain the título by writing a tesis or dissertation, or by a period of professional experience or an examination.

So the "síntesis de grado" is a requirement of the academic licenciatura programme, and the "seminario de título" is to enable you to gain the título profesional.

A few references to back this up. First, the following document, on an education degree in a Chilean university, indicates that "síntesis de grado" is the same thing as "seminario de licenciatura" and is prior to the título:

"El Seminario de Licenciatura o Síntesis de Grado en Educación, es una actividad curricular de carácter obligatorio en aquellas carreras que por Ley otorgan el grado académico de Licenciado antes de la obtención del título profesional. Da cuenta del trabajo académico del estudiante."
http://www.faced.ucm.cl/cip/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/CARAC...

"Typically the Título Profesional is earned after the Licenciado following additional program requirements such as a thesis, professional training or a professional examination."
http://wenr.wes.org/2013/12/introduction-to-the-higher-educa...

""Licenciado" it is similar to the Bachelor, but to get it is necessary to complete at least eight semesters of study on the subjects which are part of the Major. This degree is enough to continue developing an academic career, however, to get a professional title -which is not academic, but allows you to get a professional practice, you have to continue one or two additional years of study."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Academic_degree#Chile

So "síntesis de grado" is the "seminario de licenciatura" and is for writing the graduation dissertation (thesis) for the academic degree. I don't want to raise the question of whether to translate "licenciatura" as bachelor's degree or licentiate degree; this has been endlessly discussed here in the past. I think that since the distinction here is between the academic degree and the professional degree/qualification/title that follows it, the term "academic degree" could safely be used.

See also this previous question, which I answered (there are others, but this one in particular is about Chile):
http://www.proz.com/kudoz/spanish_to_english/education_pedag...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 hrs (2016-12-15 03:03:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

By the way, you need have no qualms about using the term "licenciatura" in a document to be submitted to a British university; they'll know what it is. Here, for example, is the University of Brighton's page for international students on Chilean qualifications:

"Postgraduate
We require a Grado de Licenciado en / Título (Profesional) de [subject area] when awarded after four years of study."

And the Graduate Recruitment Bureau's international degree equivalents:

"Chile Licenciatura British Bachelor degree standard
Chile Professional degree British Bachelor degree standard"
http://employers.grb.uk.com/international-degree-equivalents

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 hrs (2016-12-15 03:04:06 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Forgot to post the URL for the Brighton reference:
https://www.brighton.ac.uk/international/study-with-us/your-...
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 23:44
Grading comment
Thanks so much for the explanation!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4licenciatura (academic degree) dissertation seminar
Charles Davis


  

Answers


8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
licenciatura (academic degree) dissertation seminar


Explanation:
(For an American readership "thesis" would be more suitable than "dissertation"; the use of these terms is the other way round from British English.)

It does seem confusing that there is a "síntesis de grado" and also a "seminario de título", but the crux of this is that "grado" and "título" are not synonyms. In Chile, as in some other Latin American countries, there is a distinction between the academic degree (licenciatura, or grado) and the professional degree or "title". The former usually involves at least four years of study and requires completing the full academic degree programme. But then in order to practise professionally you need the "título" or "título profesional", which involves a further year or two of study on top of the full academic degree. You usually gain the título by writing a tesis or dissertation, or by a period of professional experience or an examination.

So the "síntesis de grado" is a requirement of the academic licenciatura programme, and the "seminario de título" is to enable you to gain the título profesional.

A few references to back this up. First, the following document, on an education degree in a Chilean university, indicates that "síntesis de grado" is the same thing as "seminario de licenciatura" and is prior to the título:

"El Seminario de Licenciatura o Síntesis de Grado en Educación, es una actividad curricular de carácter obligatorio en aquellas carreras que por Ley otorgan el grado académico de Licenciado antes de la obtención del título profesional. Da cuenta del trabajo académico del estudiante."
http://www.faced.ucm.cl/cip/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/CARAC...

"Typically the Título Profesional is earned after the Licenciado following additional program requirements such as a thesis, professional training or a professional examination."
http://wenr.wes.org/2013/12/introduction-to-the-higher-educa...

""Licenciado" it is similar to the Bachelor, but to get it is necessary to complete at least eight semesters of study on the subjects which are part of the Major. This degree is enough to continue developing an academic career, however, to get a professional title -which is not academic, but allows you to get a professional practice, you have to continue one or two additional years of study."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Academic_degree#Chile

So "síntesis de grado" is the "seminario de licenciatura" and is for writing the graduation dissertation (thesis) for the academic degree. I don't want to raise the question of whether to translate "licenciatura" as bachelor's degree or licentiate degree; this has been endlessly discussed here in the past. I think that since the distinction here is between the academic degree and the professional degree/qualification/title that follows it, the term "academic degree" could safely be used.

See also this previous question, which I answered (there are others, but this one in particular is about Chile):
http://www.proz.com/kudoz/spanish_to_english/education_pedag...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 hrs (2016-12-15 03:03:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

By the way, you need have no qualms about using the term "licenciatura" in a document to be submitted to a British university; they'll know what it is. Here, for example, is the University of Brighton's page for international students on Chilean qualifications:

"Postgraduate
We require a Grado de Licenciado en / Título (Profesional) de [subject area] when awarded after four years of study."

And the Graduate Recruitment Bureau's international degree equivalents:

"Chile Licenciatura British Bachelor degree standard
Chile Professional degree British Bachelor degree standard"
http://employers.grb.uk.com/international-degree-equivalents

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 hrs (2016-12-15 03:04:06 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Forgot to post the URL for the Brighton reference:
https://www.brighton.ac.uk/international/study-with-us/your-...

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 23:44
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 463
Grading comment
Thanks so much for the explanation!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Christian Nielsen-Palacios: Excellent research! Different in other countries.
12 hrs
  -> Thanks, Christian! That's right; it's not quite the same. In Peru, for example, as I remember from a previous question.
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