fermentar en bloque

English translation: leave the dough to prove

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:fermentar en bloque
English translation:leave the dough to prove
Entered by: Rachel Fell

12:45 Nov 22, 2006
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary
Spanish term or phrase: fermentar en bloque
Referred to dough, after kneaded and gathered together.
Hack
Local time: 07:29
leave the dough to prove
Explanation:
I think maybe the verb is " to proof" in US English, but "prove" for UK

Also, leave the dough in a warm place to rest and double in size

We say "the dough" - the "bloque" part is redundant here


a US site:
The term proof in bread baking has two meanings -- one having to do with yeast and the other having to do with dough. 1) Yeast is proofed in water and a small amount of sugar to determine whether its active before using. A sourdough or sponge starter can be proofed to determine whether it's still active by feeding it more flour and water and letting it ferment and bubble; 2) Proofing also denotes a stage in the rising of the dough. After its first rise, the dough is punched down and shaped in its final form. It is then set out for its final rise, known as "proofing".

http://www.baking911.com/bread/101_fermentation.htm

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Note added at 1 hr (2006-11-22 14:27:28 GMT)
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and leave the bowl and leave the dough in a warm place to prove. ... Let rise until double in size. Divide the dough in two parts and roll each part out to ...
www.florilegium.org/files/FOOD-BREADS/brd-mk-ethnic-msg.htm...

UK site:

In this way, the dough is activated and rises while it is left to prove. With its long, slow fermentation, sourdough is prized for its depth of flavour. ...
www.waitrose.com/food_drink/wfi/foodpeople/producers/980805... -

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Note added at 3 hrs (2006-11-22 16:11:05 GMT)
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If the dough is not "en bloque" it'll say e.g. leave the dough balls to prove or rise
Selected response from:

Rachel Fell
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:29
Grading comment
Thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +2leave the dough to prove
Rachel Fell
4leaven or ferment (together)/leavening or fermenting
Mariana Solanet
4let the dough seat or rest
CMRP
4 -1to ferment as a whole, as a block, as one (mass)
silviantonia


  

Answers


30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
let the dough seat or rest


Explanation:
is talking about the period of time that you let the dough rest or seat to grow, you know the effect of the yeast.
fermentar = to ferment the dough

but it would be more appropriate to say: let it seat


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Note added at 54 mins (2006-11-22 13:39:09 GMT)
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en bloque : is as a whole, without dividing or separating in portions

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Note added at 55 mins (2006-11-22 13:40:32 GMT)
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when you are making pizza or bread, you let the dough seat for about 20' before separating the dough in portions

CMRP
United States
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4
Notes to answerer
Asker: What I actually need to know is "en bloque" which is not only used with the verb 'ferment' when working with doughs.

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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
leaven or ferment (together)/leavening or fermenting


Explanation:
(allow the dough) to leaven or ferment (together)

put all the dough to leaven
leaving/fermenting the dough...

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Note added at 1 hr (2006-11-22 14:36:37 GMT)
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I agree that dough is the whole thing so you don´t need to translate the block part, unless required by your context (which you have not provided) :-)

Mariana Solanet
Argentina
Local time: 02:29
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
leave the dough to prove


Explanation:
I think maybe the verb is " to proof" in US English, but "prove" for UK

Also, leave the dough in a warm place to rest and double in size

We say "the dough" - the "bloque" part is redundant here


a US site:
The term proof in bread baking has two meanings -- one having to do with yeast and the other having to do with dough. 1) Yeast is proofed in water and a small amount of sugar to determine whether its active before using. A sourdough or sponge starter can be proofed to determine whether it's still active by feeding it more flour and water and letting it ferment and bubble; 2) Proofing also denotes a stage in the rising of the dough. After its first rise, the dough is punched down and shaped in its final form. It is then set out for its final rise, known as "proofing".

http://www.baking911.com/bread/101_fermentation.htm

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2006-11-22 14:27:28 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

and leave the bowl and leave the dough in a warm place to prove. ... Let rise until double in size. Divide the dough in two parts and roll each part out to ...
www.florilegium.org/files/FOOD-BREADS/brd-mk-ethnic-msg.htm...

UK site:

In this way, the dough is activated and rises while it is left to prove. With its long, slow fermentation, sourdough is prized for its depth of flavour. ...
www.waitrose.com/food_drink/wfi/foodpeople/producers/980805... -

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2006-11-22 16:11:05 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

If the dough is not "en bloque" it'll say e.g. leave the dough balls to prove or rise

Rachel Fell
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:29
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 180
Grading comment
Thanks!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  sarahjeanne: exactly!
4 mins
  -> Thank you Sarah!

agree  Carol Gullidge: yes! prove in UK English
7 hrs
  -> Thanks Carol!
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
to ferment as a whole, as a block, as one (mass)


Explanation:
Because it is talking about the chemical activity of the yeast upon the dough, I think you have to use the chemical term in English as well; yeast ferments dough and makes it rise, in this case, as a whole, in a block, as one unsegmented mass.

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Note added at 4 hrs (2006-11-22 16:52:50 GMT)
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When I bake bread, or make pizza, sometimes I let the dough ferment in a block, as a whole, and sometimes I break and form it into pizza or into baguettes, it can then ferment or rise individually, covered with pañitos and away from drafts or light. If they are using en bloque, it is because they are allowing the dough to rise without separation.

When one makes a cinnamon coffee cake or coffee ring, one lets it rise as a whole, when it is coffee cakes, individually, these are formed and then allowed to rise.

Proving the yeast, by the way, is done prior to mixing and kneading, and usually involves using a bit of sugar and warm water to see if the yeast is still fresh and capable of fermenting the dough.

silviantonia
United States
Local time: 22:29
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  sarahjeanne: rachel is right; dough means the whole thing
9 mins
  -> Not necessarily, see my note above, but hey, para gustos se han hecho colores, y para colores, flores.
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