dejar que cueza a pequeños borbotones

English translation: simmer

17:38 Sep 20, 2019
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary
Spanish term or phrase: dejar que cueza a pequeños borbotones
Hi,

This is a recipe for cod stock. The entire instruction is: "En cuanto empiece a hervir, bajar el fuego al mínimo y dejar que cueza a pequeños borbotones". So far I have translated, "As soon as it starts to boil, lower to the minimum heat and simmer...." but am unsure of 'a pequeños borbotones'.

Thanks in advance!
Dawn Redman
Spain
Local time: 14:34
English translation:simmer
Explanation:
Simmer would be the right word. We do not have an equivalent in Spanish (the French have ¨mijoter¨, the Italian ¨sobbollire¨), hence the ¨pequeños borbotones¨. Normalmente se dice ¨a fuego lento¨. Pero lo importante es que no hierva.

¨El tiempo de cocción, a fuego moderado, es decir, que salgan pequeños borbotones pero que no llegue e hervir, debe ser de dieciocho minutos, echando las ...¨
http://www.gijonfilmfestival.com/recetas/show/22-arroz-con-a...
Selected response from:

Cecilia Gowar
United Kingdom
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +5simmer
Cecilia Gowar
3 +3cook at a bare simmer
Jane Martin
3 +3poach / simmer
Robert Carter
3simmer with little /gentle bubling
Juan Arturo Blackmore Zerón
Summary of reference entries provided
Bubble rate and simmering - who knew?
Jane Martin

Discussion entries: 9





  

Answers


15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
poach / simmer


Explanation:
At first I thought it meant "slow boil", but I think you're right in saying "simmer" (or "poach")

Slow boil: Bringing water to 205 degrees Fahrenheit. Bubbles break slowly.

Simmering and poaching: Like a gentle pre-boil. In a simmer, tiny bubbles break the surface gently — like a soft summer shower on a still lake. No, really, that’s what it looks like! Simmering (or poaching) occurs at a lower temperature — just below a slow boil. Temperature is 185 to 200 degrees Fahrenheit.

https://www.dummies.com/food-drink/cooking/understanding-wat...


Robert Carter
Mexico
Local time: 07:34
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nedra Rivera: I would go with "simmer" as "poach" implies cooking something in a small amount of liquid, which doesn't seem to be the case here.
2 hrs
  -> Yes, you're right, there's a difference, poaching is a subset of simmering. Thanks, Nedra.

agree  philgoddard: Yes, simmer.
4 hrs
  -> Thanks, Phil.

agree  Marie Wilson
12 hrs
  -> Thanks, Marie.
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19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
cook at a bare simmer


Explanation:
What I would go with after reading the article I have put in the reference. It also says a 'bare simmer' is perfect for stock.

A bare simmer is characterized by a couple of small bubbles breaking through the surface every 2 to 3seconds in different spots. It’s often used for slow-cooked clear stocks, which would become cloudy with too much agitation.
https://www.finecooking.com/article/whats-the-difference-bet...

Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat and then reduce the heat to maintain a bare simmer. Cook for 30 minutes, skimming off any scum with a slotted spoon or skimmer. Add the remaining ingredients, cover, and continue to cook at a bare simmer for 2 hours, adjusting the heat and skimming as necessary.
https://www.finecooking.com/recipe/chicken-broth




Jane Martin
Local time: 13:34
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 36

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rachel Fell: or "so that it is just simmering" or "simmer very gently", as the degree is important.
1 hr
  -> Thank you Rachel

agree  Robert Carter: As Rachel says, the degree is key.
2 hrs
  -> Thanks Robert

agree  James A. Walsh
16 hrs
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23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
simmer


Explanation:
Simmer would be the right word. We do not have an equivalent in Spanish (the French have ¨mijoter¨, the Italian ¨sobbollire¨), hence the ¨pequeños borbotones¨. Normalmente se dice ¨a fuego lento¨. Pero lo importante es que no hierva.

¨El tiempo de cocción, a fuego moderado, es decir, que salgan pequeños borbotones pero que no llegue e hervir, debe ser de dieciocho minutos, echando las ...¨
http://www.gijonfilmfestival.com/recetas/show/22-arroz-con-a...


Cecilia Gowar
United Kingdom
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 114
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rick Larg
13 mins
  -> Thanks Rick!

agree  Isamar: Yes, and if this is any help (https://www.escoffieronline.com/the-difference-between-poach... it mentions three kinds of simmering, and poaching is in a different section.
15 hrs
  -> Thanks Isamar!

agree  neilmac
16 hrs
  -> Thanks Neil!

agree  Michele Fauble
23 hrs
  -> Thanks Michele!

agree  Leda Roche
2 days 4 hrs
  -> Thanks Leda!
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
simmer with little /gentle bubling


Explanation:
https://www.thespruceeats.com/all-about-simmering-995786

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Note added at 2 horas (2019-09-20 19:51:28 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Srry: bubbling.

Juan Arturo Blackmore Zerón
Mexico
Local time: 07:34
Works in field
Native speaker of: Spanish
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Reference comments


14 mins
Reference: Bubble rate and simmering - who knew?

Reference information:
https://www.finecooking.com/article/whats-the-difference-bet...

Jane Martin
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 36
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