folclorizacion

English translation: "folklorization"

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:folclorizacion
English translation:"folklorization"
Entered by: Coral Getino

11:52 Apr 24, 2005
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Education / Pedagogy
Spanish term or phrase: folclorizacion
La presencia del “otro” en términos de diferencias culturales es aparentemente reconocida, y es gestionada añadiendo “actos o momentos” de “folclorización” de esas “otras culturas”.
silviama
Spain
Local time: 11:53
"folklorization"
Explanation:
TRANSNATIONALISM AND MAYA DRESS By Irma Alicia Vel uez Nimatuj In ...
... have aggravated both the folklorization and exploitation of Mayan people, ...
to a more extensive folklorization of Mayan cultures and images of Mayan ...
www.ssrc.org/programs/gsc/gsc_quarterly/ newsletter8/content/velazquez.page - 31k - Cached - Similar pages

Music, Power, and Politics - Introduction
... hegemonic processes in the folklorization of indigenous dance in Mexico; ...
Folklorization, and the Viejitos Dance of Michoacán, Mexico” discuss at ...
www.musicpowerpolitics.com/intro.html - 14k - Cached - Similar pages

American Ethnologist - Online Book Reviews
... And what does the particular case of Santería’s “folklorization” say about
... and early 20th centuries and the “folklorization” of Afro-Cuban religion ...
www.aaanet.org/aes/bkreviews/ result_details.cfm?bk_id=1794 - 30k - Cached - Similar pages

Hebrew & Aramaic again (was: Josephus & 1Esdras)
... through two >> processes of first folklorization and then de-folklorization,
... then your hypothesis would require first the folklorization of that ...
lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/ b-hebrew/1999-July/003582.html - 9k - Cached - Similar pages

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 16 hrs 20 mins (2005-04-25 04:13:17 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Google
582 references \"folklorization\"
317 references \"folklorization-music\"

Many of those references are from universities, I agree it may not be a common language term. The text in Spanish is also very academic, and I believe \"folklorization\" is appropriate. I wish there was more context.

As for the origin of this term, I do not know (and I don\'t have time to further research it) but I found an interesting paper, because of both the content and the author background (not latin or romance, but oriental.)

>
> Dr. Hyun-key Kim Hogarth
> 17 St. Thomas Hill
> Canterbury
> Kent CT2 8HW
> U.K.
> Tel/fax: (01227) 781187 From Korea: +44-1227-781187
>
> Institutional affiliation: The Roayl Anthropological Institute
>
>
> Title: Folkorization of the Shamanistic Heritage in Contemporary Korea:
> Folklore, National Identity and Korean Shamanism
>
> Abstract
>
> This paper discusses the \'folklorization\' of the shamanistic heritage in
> contemporary Korean society. The ethnographic material that I focus on in
> this paper is one of the most celebrated festivals in contemporary Korea,
> commonly known as the Kangnung Tanoje Festival, held annually on the fifth
> day of the fifth month in the lunar calendar on the east coast of Korea.
>
> First I will present definitions of \'folklorization\' and \'folklore.\' The
> scholarly study of folklore began in the mid-nineteenth century, although
> there were precursors such as Johann Gottfried von Herder (1744-1803), a
> German critic and poet. The English term \'folklore\' was coined in 1846 by
> British antiquarian William John Thomas, who defined it as \'the manners,
> customs, observances, superstitions, ballad, proverbs, etc., of the olden
> times\' (cited in Bauman 1992). Borne out of the nineteenth century notions of
> romanticism and nationalism, folklore became a subject of serious study among
> \'individuals who felt nostalgia for the past and/or the necessity of
> documenting the existence of national consciousness or identity (Dundes
> 1980:1).\'
> Although the concepts of \'folk\' and \'folklore\' have undergone great changes
> in recent years in western academe (Dundes 1980), Thomas\'s notion prevails in
> contemporary Korea. Folklore studies are mainly concerned with preserving
> the fast disappearing old customs and traditions, etc, and thus closely
> linked with the Korean national identity and cultural nationalism. The term
> \'folklorization\' invariably has connotations of national identity and
> nationalism.
>
> The Kangnung Tanoje Festival is a prime example of how the shamanistic
> heritage is kept alive and cherished by modern Korean people, despite their
> great advancement in science and technology. It confirms the fact that
> Korean shamanism is an integral part of Korean culture. Although its
> practices may be disappearing, especially in an urban setting,
> \'folkorization\' of the shamanistic heritage, will continue to occur, thus
> reconfirming its importance in the lives of the Korean people.
>
http://koreaweb.ws/pipermail/koreanstudies_koreaweb.ws/2000-...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 16 hrs 21 mins (2005-04-25 04:14:24 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Excuse me... author\'s background.
Selected response from:

Coral Getino
United States
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +7"folklorization"
Coral Getino
5acculturation or?
Elizabeth Lyons


  

Answers


18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +7
"folklorization"


Explanation:
TRANSNATIONALISM AND MAYA DRESS By Irma Alicia Vel uez Nimatuj In ...
... have aggravated both the folklorization and exploitation of Mayan people, ...
to a more extensive folklorization of Mayan cultures and images of Mayan ...
www.ssrc.org/programs/gsc/gsc_quarterly/ newsletter8/content/velazquez.page - 31k - Cached - Similar pages

Music, Power, and Politics - Introduction
... hegemonic processes in the folklorization of indigenous dance in Mexico; ...
Folklorization, and the Viejitos Dance of Michoacán, Mexico” discuss at ...
www.musicpowerpolitics.com/intro.html - 14k - Cached - Similar pages

American Ethnologist - Online Book Reviews
... And what does the particular case of Santería’s “folklorization” say about
... and early 20th centuries and the “folklorization” of Afro-Cuban religion ...
www.aaanet.org/aes/bkreviews/ result_details.cfm?bk_id=1794 - 30k - Cached - Similar pages

Hebrew & Aramaic again (was: Josephus & 1Esdras)
... through two >> processes of first folklorization and then de-folklorization,
... then your hypothesis would require first the folklorization of that ...
lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/ b-hebrew/1999-July/003582.html - 9k - Cached - Similar pages

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 16 hrs 20 mins (2005-04-25 04:13:17 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Google
582 references \"folklorization\"
317 references \"folklorization-music\"

Many of those references are from universities, I agree it may not be a common language term. The text in Spanish is also very academic, and I believe \"folklorization\" is appropriate. I wish there was more context.

As for the origin of this term, I do not know (and I don\'t have time to further research it) but I found an interesting paper, because of both the content and the author background (not latin or romance, but oriental.)

>
> Dr. Hyun-key Kim Hogarth
> 17 St. Thomas Hill
> Canterbury
> Kent CT2 8HW
> U.K.
> Tel/fax: (01227) 781187 From Korea: +44-1227-781187
>
> Institutional affiliation: The Roayl Anthropological Institute
>
>
> Title: Folkorization of the Shamanistic Heritage in Contemporary Korea:
> Folklore, National Identity and Korean Shamanism
>
> Abstract
>
> This paper discusses the \'folklorization\' of the shamanistic heritage in
> contemporary Korean society. The ethnographic material that I focus on in
> this paper is one of the most celebrated festivals in contemporary Korea,
> commonly known as the Kangnung Tanoje Festival, held annually on the fifth
> day of the fifth month in the lunar calendar on the east coast of Korea.
>
> First I will present definitions of \'folklorization\' and \'folklore.\' The
> scholarly study of folklore began in the mid-nineteenth century, although
> there were precursors such as Johann Gottfried von Herder (1744-1803), a
> German critic and poet. The English term \'folklore\' was coined in 1846 by
> British antiquarian William John Thomas, who defined it as \'the manners,
> customs, observances, superstitions, ballad, proverbs, etc., of the olden
> times\' (cited in Bauman 1992). Borne out of the nineteenth century notions of
> romanticism and nationalism, folklore became a subject of serious study among
> \'individuals who felt nostalgia for the past and/or the necessity of
> documenting the existence of national consciousness or identity (Dundes
> 1980:1).\'
> Although the concepts of \'folk\' and \'folklore\' have undergone great changes
> in recent years in western academe (Dundes 1980), Thomas\'s notion prevails in
> contemporary Korea. Folklore studies are mainly concerned with preserving
> the fast disappearing old customs and traditions, etc, and thus closely
> linked with the Korean national identity and cultural nationalism. The term
> \'folklorization\' invariably has connotations of national identity and
> nationalism.
>
> The Kangnung Tanoje Festival is a prime example of how the shamanistic
> heritage is kept alive and cherished by modern Korean people, despite their
> great advancement in science and technology. It confirms the fact that
> Korean shamanism is an integral part of Korean culture. Although its
> practices may be disappearing, especially in an urban setting,
> \'folkorization\' of the shamanistic heritage, will continue to occur, thus
> reconfirming its importance in the lives of the Korean people.
>
http://koreaweb.ws/pipermail/koreanstudies_koreaweb.ws/2000-...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 16 hrs 21 mins (2005-04-25 04:14:24 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Excuse me... author\'s background.

Coral Getino
United States
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 46

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Paula Morabito
1 hr
  -> gracias!

agree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz (X)
2 hrs
  -> gracias!

agree  sonja29 (X)
2 hrs
  -> gracias!

agree  Rachel Fell
3 hrs
  -> gracias!

agree  felizfeliz
4 hrs
  -> gracias!

agree  MATRIX TRANSL
5 hrs
  -> gracias!

neutral  Elizabeth Lyons: With due respect, if insufficient context, how could you decide on "folklorization" ? I still believe "acculturation" is a better and more technical term for this social phenomenon, with respect to your examples given here.
5 hrs
  -> There is not enough context to be able to discern between "acculturation" and "folklorization".

neutral  bigedsenior: I second Elizabeth's comments. In fact, I'm not sure what "folklorization" means. Folklore exists, it can't be created. Does it mean formalizing it, commercializing it, What?
6 hrs
  -> Denise explained the difference beautifully!! Folklorization is to add on, acculturation is to take away.

agree  Gabriel Aramburo Siegert: I would also go straight... Short and good.
9 hrs
  -> Thanks, Gabriel!

neutral  Denise De Pe�a: In the paragraph above folcklorization refers to the incorporation of foreign cultural mores into the culture under discussion, whereas acculturation refers to the loss of certain elements in a particular culture.
9 hrs
  -> That is exactly what I understand!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
acculturation or?


Explanation:
Folklorization, while a latinate translation, is a questionable term in English and in social science. If there is not enough context here to decide, then folklorization should not be used. Common parlance can often be inaccurate and when it is, avoided. Just because something is popular or politically correct does not make it the best choice; if it is more than politically correct or popular in other languages also does not make it the best choice in English.
The asker will, of course, decide what she wishes to use for her project:)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 hrs 30 mins (2005-04-24 20:23:02 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In reflecting on it, this term \"folklorization\" is not even a latinate; it is an adaptation by someone, somwhere of an Anglo-Saxon form of the Teutonic word for folklore, turned into a modern latin word and then translated as a cognate back into English. :)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day 9 hrs 51 mins (2005-04-25 21:43:35 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The argument that acculturation implies taking something away is specious. Folklorization is a made-up term; acculturation simply means the incorporation of one culture\'s habits and beliefs and practices into anothers. It is not a zero-sum game. The asker is free to choose that word since the original text uses it, but it is a poor term with little meaning that is better expressed by other non-evaluative terms such as the one I suggested. Hegemony might imply that but not acculturation.

Elizabeth Lyons
United States
Local time: 02:53
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
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