chocolatería

English translation: chocolate house

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:chocolatería
English translation:chocolate house
Entered by: Oso (X)

02:49 Apr 15, 2005
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - History / -customs
Spanish term or phrase: chocolatería
From a piece about the history of chocolate:
"Los ingleses lo descubrieron en 1657, abriendo de inmediato varias chocolaterías populares."

So, it appears to refer to some kind of establishment were chocolate was served, not a factory.
I can think of "chocolate shops", but maybe there is a more specific term out there.
George Rabel
Local time: 16:04
chocolate house
Explanation:
Methinks ¶:^)

Buena suerte y saludos del Oso ¶:^)

"...Not everyone was eager to accept the mysterious new drink so readily though. At first the French were suspicious of this new drink and considered it a dangerous drug! Although there are several theories the most likely is that it took Spanish royalty to save the day. A Spanish Princess, Anne of Austria, married into the French Court and introduced drinking chocolate as a fashionable past time. By the mid-1600s, the chocolate drink had gained widespread popularity in France and an enterprising Frenchman opened the first ***chocolate house*** in London.

In France, chocolate was met with skepticism and was considered a "barbarous product and noxious drug". The French court was doubtful and accepted it only after the Paris faculty of medicine gave its approval. A French queen finally saved the day. In 1615, Anne of Austria, wife of Louis XIII declared chocolate as the drink of the French court.

During the early seventeenth century, chocolate found its way to Italy and England, among other European countries. In 1650, chocolate became the rage in Oxford and ***in 1657, a shop called the The Coffee Mill and Tobacco Roll opened in London.*** Although chocolate was not featured, the drink quickly became a best seller. As the popularity of chocolate grew, England imposed an excessive duty of 10-15 shillings per pound. By the way, the duty was comparable to approximately three-fourths its weight in gold. It took almost 200 years before the duty was dropped.

***The first chocolate house was reputedly opened in London in 1657 by an unnamed Frenchman*****. Costing 6 to 8 shillings per pound (about 34p), chocolate was considered a beverage for the elite class. By the 1700s, chocolate houses were as prominent as coffee houses in England and there was a chocolate house for every type of clientele: politicians, gamblers, literati and the beautiful people - White's Chocolate House in St James's Street became one of the most popular meeting places for men and women. Charles II tried unsuccessfully to suppress these establishments which he considered 'hotbeds of sedition'. However, in the mid-nineteenth century the chocolate houses were transformed into more respectable 'clubs for gentlemen'. Several still exist today around Pall Mall including the famous White's. At this time chocolate was still being prepared by hand and another very different group of people were also taking an interest in it…"


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2005-04-15 23:44:03 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Otros fun-facts:

\"Chocolate Houses

When chocolate finally reached England in the 1650s, the high import duties on cocoa beans meant it was a drink only for the wealthy. Chocolate cost the equivalent of 50-75 pence a pound (approximately 400g), when pound sterling was worth considerably more than it is today. Gradually chocolate became more freely available. In 1657, London\'s first Chocolate House was opened by a Frenchman, who produced the first advertisement for the chocolate drink to be seen in London:

\"In Bishopgate St, in Queen\'s Head Alley, at a Frenchman\'s house, is an excellent West Indian drink called Chocolate to be sold, where you may have it ready at any time and also unmade at reasonable rates.\"

Fashionable chocolate houses were soon opened where the people could meet friends and enjoy various rich chocolate drinks, many of which were rather bitter to taste, while discussing the serious political, social and business affairs of the day or gossiping.

Samuel Pepys, the famous diarist, wrote of his visits to chocolate houses:

\"Went to Mr Bland\'s and there drank my morning draft of chocollatte.\"

The most famous one was White\'s Chocolate House in the fashionable St James Street, opened in 1693 by Frances White, an Italian immigrant.

The chocolate drinks, served along with ale, beer, snacks and coffee, would have been made from blocks of solid cocoa, probably imported from Spain, and a pressed cake from which the drink could be made at home was also sold. Around 1700 the English improved the drink by adding milk.

By the end of the 18th century London\'s chocolate houses began to disappear, many of the more fashionable ones becoming smart gentlemen\'s clubs. White\'s Chocolate House is to this day an exclusive gentlemen\'s club in St James\', London.\"

http://www.cadbury.co.uk/EN/CTB2003/about_chocolate/history_...
Selected response from:

Oso (X)
Grading comment
Mi más espumoso y humeante agradecimiento. Entre "chocolate house", "cocoa house" y chocolate room", los Orishas me aconsejan que elija la respuesta del perínclito plantígrado.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +10chocolate house
Oso (X)
4 +4Chocolate shop
Gabriela Mejías
4 +1chocolate store
Leopoldo Gurman
4Chocolate Room
Paul Roige (X)


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
chocolatería
Chocolate shop


Explanation:
Creo que es lo mismo que coffe shop... yo lo pondría así. Suerte!

Gabriela Mejías
Argentina
Local time: 17:04
Native speaker of: Spanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Xenia Wong
23 mins
  -> Gracias, Xenia!!! Saludos y buen finde!

agree  Fuseila
4 hrs
  -> Gracias, Fuseila! Saludos!

agree  Christina Courtright
8 hrs
  -> Gracias y saludos!

agree  Gabriela Rodriguez: Igualmente para vos, Gaby (parece que me estuviera hablando a mi misma jajaja), saludos!!!!!!!
1 day 16 mins
  -> Gracias! para Gaby de Gaby... buen finde!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
chocolatería
chocolate store


Explanation:
Otra opción dentro de la misma línea =:)

Existe
cho·co·la·tier (chôÅkà là t"rÆ, chokÅÃ-, chôkÅlÃ-, chokÅ-; Fr. shô kô lA ty!Æ), n., pl. -tiers (-t"rzÆ; Fr. -ty!Æ).
a person or firm that makes and sells chocolate candy.
[< F; see CHOCOLATE, -IER2]
Pero no me convence.
Saludos! =:)

Leopoldo Gurman
United States
Local time: 15:04
Native speaker of: Spanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gabriela Rodriguez
1 day 4 mins
  -> Gracias gaby! =:)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

34 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +10
chocolate house


Explanation:
Methinks ¶:^)

Buena suerte y saludos del Oso ¶:^)

"...Not everyone was eager to accept the mysterious new drink so readily though. At first the French were suspicious of this new drink and considered it a dangerous drug! Although there are several theories the most likely is that it took Spanish royalty to save the day. A Spanish Princess, Anne of Austria, married into the French Court and introduced drinking chocolate as a fashionable past time. By the mid-1600s, the chocolate drink had gained widespread popularity in France and an enterprising Frenchman opened the first ***chocolate house*** in London.

In France, chocolate was met with skepticism and was considered a "barbarous product and noxious drug". The French court was doubtful and accepted it only after the Paris faculty of medicine gave its approval. A French queen finally saved the day. In 1615, Anne of Austria, wife of Louis XIII declared chocolate as the drink of the French court.

During the early seventeenth century, chocolate found its way to Italy and England, among other European countries. In 1650, chocolate became the rage in Oxford and ***in 1657, a shop called the The Coffee Mill and Tobacco Roll opened in London.*** Although chocolate was not featured, the drink quickly became a best seller. As the popularity of chocolate grew, England imposed an excessive duty of 10-15 shillings per pound. By the way, the duty was comparable to approximately three-fourths its weight in gold. It took almost 200 years before the duty was dropped.

***The first chocolate house was reputedly opened in London in 1657 by an unnamed Frenchman*****. Costing 6 to 8 shillings per pound (about 34p), chocolate was considered a beverage for the elite class. By the 1700s, chocolate houses were as prominent as coffee houses in England and there was a chocolate house for every type of clientele: politicians, gamblers, literati and the beautiful people - White's Chocolate House in St James's Street became one of the most popular meeting places for men and women. Charles II tried unsuccessfully to suppress these establishments which he considered 'hotbeds of sedition'. However, in the mid-nineteenth century the chocolate houses were transformed into more respectable 'clubs for gentlemen'. Several still exist today around Pall Mall including the famous White's. At this time chocolate was still being prepared by hand and another very different group of people were also taking an interest in it…"


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2005-04-15 23:44:03 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Otros fun-facts:

\"Chocolate Houses

When chocolate finally reached England in the 1650s, the high import duties on cocoa beans meant it was a drink only for the wealthy. Chocolate cost the equivalent of 50-75 pence a pound (approximately 400g), when pound sterling was worth considerably more than it is today. Gradually chocolate became more freely available. In 1657, London\'s first Chocolate House was opened by a Frenchman, who produced the first advertisement for the chocolate drink to be seen in London:

\"In Bishopgate St, in Queen\'s Head Alley, at a Frenchman\'s house, is an excellent West Indian drink called Chocolate to be sold, where you may have it ready at any time and also unmade at reasonable rates.\"

Fashionable chocolate houses were soon opened where the people could meet friends and enjoy various rich chocolate drinks, many of which were rather bitter to taste, while discussing the serious political, social and business affairs of the day or gossiping.

Samuel Pepys, the famous diarist, wrote of his visits to chocolate houses:

\"Went to Mr Bland\'s and there drank my morning draft of chocollatte.\"

The most famous one was White\'s Chocolate House in the fashionable St James Street, opened in 1693 by Frances White, an Italian immigrant.

The chocolate drinks, served along with ale, beer, snacks and coffee, would have been made from blocks of solid cocoa, probably imported from Spain, and a pressed cake from which the drink could be made at home was also sold. Around 1700 the English improved the drink by adding milk.

By the end of the 18th century London\'s chocolate houses began to disappear, many of the more fashionable ones becoming smart gentlemen\'s clubs. White\'s Chocolate House is to this day an exclusive gentlemen\'s club in St James\', London.\"

http://www.cadbury.co.uk/EN/CTB2003/about_chocolate/history_...



    Reference: http://www.middleboro.k12.ma.us/Middleboro/CHOC/Chocolate.ht...
Oso (X)
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 16
Grading comment
Mi más espumoso y humeante agradecimiento. Entre "chocolate house", "cocoa house" y chocolate room", los Orishas me aconsejan que elija la respuesta del perínclito plantígrado.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  teju: Methinks I agree, because when I think of chocolate store or shop, I think that it's a place to buy chocolate candy, and not a place to drink hot cocoa (I think that's what George needs, judging from his other question) :)))
1 hr
  -> Hola Teju, mil gracias ¶:^)

agree  bigedsenior: They were chocolate houses in the beginning and still are today. In the US they are HOT-chocolate houses.
1 hr
  -> Mil gracias, bigedsenior ¶:^)

agree  Adriana de Groote
1 hr
  -> Muchas gracias, Adriana ¶:^)

agree  Michele Fauble
3 hrs
  -> Muchas gracias, Michele ¶:^)

agree  moken: :O)
3 hrs
  -> Muchas gracias, Álvaro ¶:o)

agree  Margarita Palatnik (X)
6 hrs
  -> Muchas gracias, Margarita ¶:^)

agree  mar52
14 hrs
  -> Muchas gracias, mar52 ¶:^)

agree  colemh: 8-)
16 hrs
  -> ¡Hola colemh! Muchas gracias y....¡feliz viernes! ¶8^)

agree  Claudia Luque Bedregal
19 hrs
  -> Muchas gracias, clb ¶:^)

agree  Gabriela Rodriguez
23 hrs
  -> Hola Gaby, muchas, muchas gracias ¶:^)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

18 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
chocolatería
Chocolate Room


Explanation:
Option. Two examples. England:
"The Arrival of Chocolate in Europe.
The Spanish Conquistador, Don Hernán Cortés recognised the potential commercial value of chocolate. He brought cocoa beans back to Spain in 1528 and very gradually the custom of drinking chocolate spread across Europe. In 1657 the first of many Chocolate Rooms where chocolate was enjoyed appeared in England"
And Chicago, US:
"Unique So Chique Tea & Chocolate Room is a cozy space located in the back of a boutique that sells clothing, bath products, kids and babies gifts, candles, jewelry, gifts, etc. The actual tea room seats up to 22 people and not only serves daily afternoon tea (with scones, sweets and savories), but also lunch during the week (gourmet sandwiches, pizzas, cassoulets, salads) and weekend brunch (omelets, quiche, french toast). Great freshly-baked scones, toffees, fudge and truffles."
And Brooklyn has one too:
""No one walks into a chocolate shop in a bad mood," says Jon Payson, co-owner of the Chocolate Room with wife Naomi Josepher. Indulgences include espresso chocolate flan and chocolate fondue, famed confectioner Fritz Kripschildt's full line of artisanal chocolates, and three kinds of hot cocoa so potent and rich they make you wish you were Augustus Gloop from 'Willy Wonka.' They're even available with a square of homemade marshmallow. Personal vision is apparent and homey touches abound, from the classic Brooklyn decor of dark wood, exposed brick and hexagonal tile floor, to the shelves up front with books, music and small items for sale from neighborhood artists and craftspeople. A selection of port, prosecco and wines that pair well with chocolate give reason to linger beyond dessert, so those few who do happen enter in a bad mood certainly won't leave in one."



    Reference: http://www.thechocolateroom.com/functions.htm
    Reference: http://www.aolcityguide.com/newyork/dining/venue.adp?sbid=19...
Paul Roige (X)
Spain
Local time: 22:04
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in CatalanCatalan
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search