Dr y Dra

English translation: Dr. XXX and Dr. XXX...or Drs. XXX and XXX

03:17 Nov 20, 2018
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Human Resources
Spanish term or phrase: Dr y Dra
Es un curriculum vitae. La persona hizo muchas tesis durante sus estudios. Menciona cada vez la persona que dirigió la tesis. Dr. XXX Dra. XXX. ¿Qué me recomiendan? PhD XXX?
Gracias!
Carolina Marcote
Local time: 08:59
English translation:Dr. XXX and Dr. XXX...or Drs. XXX and XXX
Explanation:
You either put the the abbreviation at the beginning like this:
Dr. Jane Smith
or at the end:
Jane Smith, Ph.D.
Some style guides say to use "PhD" not "Ph.D."

Another thing, unless they actually do have a PhD, "Dr." is the safer and more general term. You don't want to call a medical doctor (MD) a doctor of philosophy (PhD even) even though they both can be written Dr. XXX. Let me know if you have any questions :)
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John Worthen
United States
Local time: 06:59
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +3Dr. XXX and Dr. XXX...or Drs. XXX and XXX
John Worthen


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Dr. XXX y Dra. XXX
Dr. XXX and Dr. XXX...or Drs. XXX and XXX


Explanation:
You either put the the abbreviation at the beginning like this:
Dr. Jane Smith
or at the end:
Jane Smith, Ph.D.
Some style guides say to use "PhD" not "Ph.D."

Another thing, unless they actually do have a PhD, "Dr." is the safer and more general term. You don't want to call a medical doctor (MD) a doctor of philosophy (PhD even) even though they both can be written Dr. XXX. Let me know if you have any questions :)


    Reference: http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/abbreviations.htm
John Worthen
United States
Local time: 06:59
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  philgoddard
1 min

agree  Charles Davis: It's Dr. and Ph.D. in American English and Dr and PhD in British English. In punctuation, BrE is more advanced (we dropped the point several decades ago) :-) // That's interesting. It's evolving, I think; the trend in modern English is in that direction.
1 hr
  -> I did not know that about the point in American versus British English! I do think there are some exceptions however. The APA style guide for example (one of the most common style guides in the U.S.) says to omit the periods.

agree  neilmac: I only found out about the punctuation difference recently. Although not world-shattering, it's handy to know.
7 hrs
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