El que no sabe es como el que no ve

14:12 Mar 15, 2015
This question was closed without grading. Reason: No acceptable answer

Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Idioms / Maxims / Sayings
Spanish term or phrase: El que no sabe es como el que no ve
I have to translate that idiom into English. Is there an idiom with the same meaning?
THank you.
Fernando Tognis
Argentina
Local time: 23:36


Summary of answers provided
3 +8There Are None So Blind As Those Who Will Not See
Carol Gullidge
5Those who do not know are like those who do not see
Marina Ilari
4 +1Out of sight is out of mind / Out of sight, out of mind
Ana Vozone
4the only thing worse than being blind is having sight but no vision
lugoben
4Not knowing is (like) being blind
Beatriz Ramírez de Haro
3The ignorant are blind / The ignorant are like the blind
bcsantos
3if you don't have it in mind it's worse than being blind
Darius Saczuk


Discussion entries: 8





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
if you don't have it in mind it's worse than being blind


Explanation:
P

Darius Saczuk
United States
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in PolishPolish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 36

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  AllegroTrans: Not an idiom or saying that I have ever heard
8 hrs
  -> I know...Just a shot in the dark...
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +8
There Are None So Blind As Those Who Will Not See


Explanation:
this is the nearest I can get for the time being, but hopefully it will get things moving. It fits to a certain degree, and sometimes this is the best we can aspire to...

According to the ‘Random House Dictionary of Popular Proverbs and Sayings’ this proverb has been traced back to 1546 (John Heywood), and resembles the Biblical verse Jeremiah 5:21 (‘Hear now this, O foolish people, and without understanding; which have eyes, and see not; which have ears, and hear not’). In 1738 it was used by Jonathan Swift in his ‘Polite Conversation’ and is first attested in the United States in the 1713 ‘Works of Thomas Chalkley’. The full saying is: ‘There are none so blind as those who will not see. The most deluded people are those who choose to ignore what they already know’.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 mins (2015-03-15 14:24:59 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As you can see, this is an actual proverb or well-known idiom.

There is also "There Are None So Deaf As Those Who Will Not Hear",
i.e., if you don't wish to know something, you close your eyes or ears to it


Carol Gullidge
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:36
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 138

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ray Ables
8 mins
  -> thanks Ray!

agree  Billh
17 mins
  -> thanks Bill!

agree  philgoddard
1 hr
  -> thanks Phil!

agree  franglish
1 hr
  -> thanks franglish!

agree  Phoenix III
1 hr
  -> thanks Phoenix III!

neutral  Beatriz Ramírez de Haro: The Spanish versions of this idioms are "No hay peor ciego que quien no quiere ver// No hay peor sordo que quien no quiere oír", but that is not the meaning in this case. It's not about not wanting to know/see, but about not actually knowing.
2 hrs
  -> Tx Beatrix! I did of course point out that this isn't an exact equivalent, and set the CR to 3 accordingly. However the Asker specifically requests a **set phrase/idiom**, and this does meet that requirement, without being far off in meaning//Yes, I know!

agree  AllegroTrans
3 hrs
  -> thanks Allegro!

neutral  Ana Vozone: I agree with Beatriz, and do not think your suggestion is really equivalent. "Peor ciego es aquel que no quiere ver" is not the same as "El que no sabe es como el que no ve".@Carol, I had to justify my "neutral" grading, but every suggestion helps! ;)
3 hrs
  -> No, and you'll see that I never claimed it was! But it is fairly close, and at least it is an idiom. With idioms and metaphors, something nearly always has to be sacrificed: the translator has to weigh up the importance of accuracy versus idiomacy.

agree  Lizz Bremm
6 hrs
  -> thanks Lizz!

agree  Rachel Fell: although not an exact equivalent - I know it as "There's none so blind as those who will not see" - yes, I hope the asker takes your point about context...
9 hrs
  -> Thanks Rachel! In fact, the context (posted at last!) shows that we've all been groping in the dark - a bit like the maid in question - with this one :( // I think I might now give up entirely on answering any questions posted w/o sufficient context

neutral  Marina Ilari: I agree with Beatriz, and also in Spanish this is not a idiom.
23 hrs
  -> Yes, well, as it now transpires, NOBODY has provided a suitable answer, but in any case an idiom was requested + I'm sure the Asker didn't need anyone to provide a straight translation of such a simple term.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Out of sight is out of mind / Out of sight, out of mind


Explanation:
Suggestion.




    Reference: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/out_of_sight,_out_of_mind
    Reference: http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/274400.html
Ana Vozone
Local time: 02:36
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Lydianette Soza
2 hrs
  -> Many thanks, Lydianette!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
The ignorant are blind / The ignorant are like the blind


Explanation:
Not exactly a saying but could fit the bill.

bcsantos
Gibraltar
Local time: 03:36
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 20
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
the only thing worse than being blind is having sight but no vision


Explanation:
This si the closest English quote to the one given in the ST. As may be other similar quotes I grade at 4.

http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/keywords/blind.html#MIEhDh...

lugoben
Local time: 22:36
Native speaker of: Spanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  AllegroTrans: Not an idiom or saying that I have ever heard
4 hrs
  -> It is one that comes close to the Spanish version. Reference is given. You have a long way to go to hear one that you are familiar with.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Not knowing is (like) being blind


Explanation:
This is the real meaning of the Spanish idiom.
It's a simple comparison, meant to stress the blindness of ignorance, nothing to do with not wanting to see.
Hopefully my English-speaking colleagues will find a nicer way of putting it!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2015-03-15 17:59:00 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

"Ignorance is blindness" could do the job.

Beatriz Ramírez de Haro
Spain
Local time: 03:36
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Carol Gullidge: This is a correct translation of course, and pretty basic stuff that I'd have imagined the Asker would be able to translate by himself! However, where is the "idiom" that the Asker specifically requests?
43 mins
  -> The asker specifically requests "with the same meaning". Any idiom, however similar, won't do the job IMO.

neutral  AllegroTrans: Not an idiom or saying
5 hrs
  -> As I said in my answer, I just explain the meaning of the Spanish idiom.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

23 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Those who do not know are like those who do not see


Explanation:
This is not an idiom in Spanish, it's just a phrase in your text that looks like that kind of sentence but not at all an idiom, therefore I'd just translate what it means in a formal, neutral, passive manner. Any other option would be imprecise.

Marina Ilari
United States
Local time: 20:36
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search