quedar cuerda para rato

English translation: To keep going for a while

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:Quedar cuerda para rato
English translation:To keep going for a while
Entered by: scottmcd

15:17 Apr 13, 2005
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Tech/Engineering - IT (Information Technology) / Information Architecture, Library Science
Spanish term or phrase: quedar cuerda para rato
The complete sentence is: "Yo creo que nos queda cuerda para rato."

My best translation is: "I believe that it keeps us on a (short) leash for a while." This doesn't seem to fit the context, however.

This is from an article about Information Architecture. It is in the last section (El Futuro) and is the first sentence of the second paragraph at http://iainstitute.org/es/translations/000334.html.

Many Thanks!
Scott McDaniel
I think we will keep going for a while
Explanation:
This is what I have found in my dictionary, check if it is of any help for your context/sentence.

Good luck.

tan viejo no es, todavía tiene cuerda para rato he’s not that
old, he has a good few years in him yet o there’s plenty of life in him yet; a los niños les queda
cuerda para rato the children will keep going for a while yet
Selected response from:

Maria Otero
Spain
Local time: 07:14
Grading comment
This was very helpful and fit the context of the article quite well.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +1There's a lot that lies ahead/we still have a lot to talk about...
teju
4to have plenty of gas left
MPGS
3I think we will keep going for a while
Maria Otero
2(it) will keep going for quite a while yet
Sheila Hardie
1keep on a short leash
scottmcd


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
I think we will keep going for a while


Explanation:
This is what I have found in my dictionary, check if it is of any help for your context/sentence.

Good luck.

tan viejo no es, todavía tiene cuerda para rato he’s not that
old, he has a good few years in him yet o there’s plenty of life in him yet; a los niños les queda
cuerda para rato the children will keep going for a while yet

Maria Otero
Spain
Local time: 07:14
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
Grading comment
This was very helpful and fit the context of the article quite well.
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29 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
keep on a short leash


Explanation:
Sorry about the URL. The period at the end of it got incorporated into the link. This should work:

http://iainstitute.org/es/translations/000334.html


    Reference: http://iainstitute.org/es/translations/000334.html
scottmcd
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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The asker has declined this answer

44 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
There's a lot that lies ahead/we still have a lot to talk about...


Explanation:
This expression could mean several things depending on the context. If two people having a conversation say it, then it means "We still have a lot to talk about". If they are talking about a topic in general terms, it could mean "There's a lot that lies ahead", or "We've just begun to consider this subject". I could be more helpful with more context.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 50 mins (2005-04-13 16:08:53 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

After reading the text, I would translate it as:

I think we still have a lot to talk about/plenty to talk about/to discuss



teju
Local time: 23:14
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Adriana de Groote: Así lo entiendo yo también, voto por tus últimas sugerencias.
2 hrs
  -> Muy amable Adriana :)
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
(it) will keep going for quite a while yet


Explanation:
I can't open the link either, but it probably means something like - 'It will keep going for a while yet' - 'It's not likely to break down any time soon', etc. However, I need more context to give a proper translation.

HTH



Sheila

Oxford Superlex

b (impulso, energía): no le des cuerda, que luego no hay quien lo haga callar don’t encourage him or you’ll never get him to shut up (colloq); tan viejo no es, todavía tiene cuerda para rato he’s not that old, he has a good few years in him yet o there’s plenty of life in him yet; a los niños les queda cuerda para rato the children will keep going for a while yet



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Note added at 3 hrs 9 mins (2005-04-13 18:26:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It could also mean something like \'We\'ll be around for a while yet\' / \'We won\'t be going out of business any day soon\' or \'We will still be needed for a quite a while yet\'. Something like that anyway.

Sheila Hardie
Spain
Local time: 07:14
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
to have plenty of gas left


Explanation:
... I believe that we still have plenty of gas /batteries left ...

'cuerda' comes fron winding a watch or mech toy: 'dar cuerda'

(not everything is a 'nintendo')

:)


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 33 mins (2005-04-13 16:51:16 GMT)
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para rato: plenty / to last a long time

:)

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Note added at 4 hrs 38 mins (2005-04-13 19:56:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

2 idiomatic expressions toghether:

\'tener cuerda\'
\'para rato\'

help yourself !


:)

MPGS
Local time: 07:14
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 28

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  teju: This is an idiomatic expression, not to be interpreted literally, saludos
2 hrs
  -> Agree. Just offering an option. Thanks :)
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