Locutar

English translation: narrate, read, record

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:Locutar
English translation:narrate, read, record
Entered by: NMCastellanos

15:42 Nov 16, 2015
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Journalism
Spanish term or phrase: Locutar
Hello guys

I wonder if you can help me with this one.

I am translating an article from Spanish to English and I can't find if there is an specific verb to explain the action of people who speaks in the radio, in Spanish this action is called locutar. In this case the meaning is related to people who record the books.

En España la mayoría de invidentes acceden a la lectura a través del audio libro digital, aunque el formato ha perdido calidad debido a la crisis: "Antes había personas que locutaban los textos, pero ahora, a causa de los recortes, las voces son sintéticas. Es insoportable pasado un rato", asegura Alicia Canalejas, estudiante de psicología e invidente de nacimiento en una entrevista para El Mundo.

I guess in can be translated as interpret or read and in another cases like speak or talk. But I was just wondering if there is an specific term like in Spanish.

Thank you very much in advance for your reply.

Regards

Noelia
NMCastellanos
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:28
narrate
Explanation:
locutor = narrator

The person who reads for audio books is called a narrator. Just look up any audio book on Amazon, e.g: http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-One-I-Was/dp/B00UXPXSJ2/

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Note added at 8 mins (2015-11-16 15:51:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

More famously, Stephen Fry narrates the Harry Potter audio books:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Harry-Potter-Goblet-Fire-Book/dp/185...
Selected response from:

Simon Bruni
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:28
Grading comment
Hello Simon. Thank you so much for your answer, it was really helpful. Although, as I say in the discussion, I think read and record can be also alternatives for my translation. All the best!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +7narrate
Simon Bruni
4 +1to read on the air
Francois Boye
4 +1Read (out)
Cecilia Gowar
4announce
Denise DeVries


Discussion entries: 7





  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
locutar
narrate


Explanation:
locutor = narrator

The person who reads for audio books is called a narrator. Just look up any audio book on Amazon, e.g: http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-One-I-Was/dp/B00UXPXSJ2/

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 mins (2015-11-16 15:51:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

More famously, Stephen Fry narrates the Harry Potter audio books:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Harry-Potter-Goblet-Fire-Book/dp/185...

Simon Bruni
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:28
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 60
Grading comment
Hello Simon. Thank you so much for your answer, it was really helpful. Although, as I say in the discussion, I think read and record can be also alternatives for my translation. All the best!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ronald Ponton
1 min

agree  Jorge Terrazas
3 mins

agree  Sophie Reynolds
3 mins

agree  neilmac
12 mins

agree  Carol Gullidge: indeed, what else!
25 mins

agree  James A. Walsh
27 mins

agree  philgoddard
1 hr

neutral  Francois Boye: How do you call the book and play readers on the air before television and the audio book narrators?// Isn't it written:that 'antes habia personas que locutaban los textos'?
1 hr
  -> This question is specifically about audio book narrators (read the question) / Yes, that refers to audio book narrators (they used to be people, now they are machines)

agree  Robin Levey
7 hrs

disagree  Muriel Vasconcellos: Narration is a more creative process. In this case, the actors are simply reading and recording. See my comment in the discussion. I am very familiar with the process.
11 hrs
  -> If you look at the evidence, Muriel, it's very clear that "narrate" is widely used with this specific meaning. But I agree "read" is also used.
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18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Read (out)


Explanation:
locutar.

1. intr. El Salv. Dicho de un locutor de radio: hablar (‖ proferir palabras).

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Note added at 19 mins (2015-11-16 16:02:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

.... "who read the texts"
A "locutor" is a "newsreader".

Cecilia Gowar
United Kingdom
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 68

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Carol Gullidge: not really, in this case! Please see my comment to François Boye's suggestion
20 mins

agree  Muriel Vasconcellos
10 hrs
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
to read on the air


Explanation:
on the air = blind people could listen to the reading of texts by listening to the radio

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Note added at 1 hr (2015-11-16 17:31:03 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Before the era of audio books, books and plays used to be read on the air. This is what the text above refers to: 'antes, habia personas que locutaban textos'

Francois Boye
United States
Local time: 19:28
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Phoenix III: Exactly!
17 mins
  -> Thanks!

neutral  Carol Gullidge: yes, in general, but in this case the Asker specified people recording books. This is "narrating" as opposed to, e.g., reading the news or reading a short extract on the radio, and could refer to the narration of a play or a book (narrative)
24 mins

agree  philgoddard: "On the air" isn't correct (I think the asker's reference to radio is confusing), but "read" is fine.
1 hr
  -> my translation refers to the pre-audio books era.

disagree  Robin Levey: The entire extract from the ST, as quoted by Asker, relates to audio libro digital. That is most certainly much more recent that the era when "books and plays used to be read on the air", which dates back to the days of "the wireless".
7 hrs

neutral  Muriel Vasconcellos: 'Read' is OK, but not 'on the air'. There are no radio waves here. These are actors whose reading of the book is digitally recorded.
11 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
announce


Explanation:
announcers

Denise DeVries
United States
Local time: 17:28
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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