"Por asignacion a este organo subjetivo el conocimiento del asunto"

English translation: assignment to hear the case was made to this court that has personal jurisdiction

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:"Por asignacion a este organo subjetivo el conocimiento del asunto"
English translation:assignment to hear the case was made to this court that has personal jurisdiction
Entered by: Rebecca Jowers

21:38 Oct 28, 2013
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Law (general)
Spanish term or phrase: "Por asignacion a este organo subjetivo el conocimiento del asunto"
In a Venezuelan Divorce decree.... the whole phrase reads:
"correspondiendole por asignacion a este organo subjetivo el conocimiento del asunto"
BFS1970
Local time: 07:01
assignment to hear the case was made to this court that has personal jurisdiction
Explanation:
I agree with AllegroTrans that it would be useful to have additional context to be able to provide an accurate answer to your query. But for starts my first observation would be to underscore that I don’t think that a literal translation will work here, since several of the terms in your question have very specific meanings in legal Spanish:

“asunto”—in this context, "asunto" is more than a "matter", referring specifically to the "case" before the court (here, a petition for divorce)

“conocimiento del asunto”—in this context “conocimiento” doesn’t refer to “knowledge” but rather to the court’s “hearing of the case”. This is a common idiomatic expression in legal Spanish: “conocer de (un asunto; una causa, etc.) = “to hear a case”

“órgano”—in this context “órgano” doesn’t refer generically to an “authority,” but rather is an often-used abbreviation of the expressions “órgano judicial” or “órgano jurisdiccional”, i.e., one of the many terms in Spanish for “court”.

“subjetivo”—in this context I don't think “subjetivo” means “subjective” (a “subjective court”?) but rather I suspect that the reference is to the “court having personal jurisdiction.” I am basing this suggestion on the fact that “competencia subjetiva” is the Spanish equivalent of “personal jurisdiction” or “in personam jurisdiction”. But it might be best to confirm this with a Venezuelan colleague.
Selected response from:

Rebecca Jowers
Spain
Local time: 08:01
Grading comment
Thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4assignment to hear the case was made to this court that has personal jurisdiction
Rebecca Jowers
4The knowledge of the matter is assigned to this subjective authority
paragonc


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
The knowledge of the matter is assigned to this subjective authority


Explanation:
The idea needs to be worded as a sentence.

paragonc
Spain
Local time: 08:01
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 12
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12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
assignment to hear the case was made to this court that has personal jurisdiction


Explanation:
I agree with AllegroTrans that it would be useful to have additional context to be able to provide an accurate answer to your query. But for starts my first observation would be to underscore that I don’t think that a literal translation will work here, since several of the terms in your question have very specific meanings in legal Spanish:

“asunto”—in this context, "asunto" is more than a "matter", referring specifically to the "case" before the court (here, a petition for divorce)

“conocimiento del asunto”—in this context “conocimiento” doesn’t refer to “knowledge” but rather to the court’s “hearing of the case”. This is a common idiomatic expression in legal Spanish: “conocer de (un asunto; una causa, etc.) = “to hear a case”

“órgano”—in this context “órgano” doesn’t refer generically to an “authority,” but rather is an often-used abbreviation of the expressions “órgano judicial” or “órgano jurisdiccional”, i.e., one of the many terms in Spanish for “court”.

“subjetivo”—in this context I don't think “subjetivo” means “subjective” (a “subjective court”?) but rather I suspect that the reference is to the “court having personal jurisdiction.” I am basing this suggestion on the fact that “competencia subjetiva” is the Spanish equivalent of “personal jurisdiction” or “in personam jurisdiction”. But it might be best to confirm this with a Venezuelan colleague.


Rebecca Jowers
Spain
Local time: 08:01
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 2210
Grading comment
Thanks
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



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