Tribunal

English translation: multi-judge court

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:Tribunal
English translation:multi-judge court
Entered by: Rebecca Jowers

19:41 Feb 27, 2019
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general) / Justice System
Spanish term or phrase: Tribunal
I am translating a law text from Argentina and I do not know how to make a differenc between the term "Juzgado" presided by one Judge and a "Tribunal" composed of three judges.

I have been using the term "court" for Juzgado but I cannot find a good option for "tribunal".

"....se logró avanzar con el tratamiento de muchos casos que habían quedado paralizados por la falta de integrantes en los Tribunales Orales en lo Criminal Federal y los Tribunales Orales en lo Penal Económico...Por otro lado, se ha dotado a los Juzgados Nacionales con los recursos necesarios para...."

Thank you for your help.
678
multi-judge court
Explanation:
Publications from the US Federal Judicial Center use "single-judge court" for what in most Spanish-speaking jurisdictions are called "juzgados," and "mult-judge court" for "tribunales" (courts with more than one sitting judge, often three, who sit in panels).

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Note added at 1 hr (2019-02-27 20:47:01 GMT)
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I don't think I would use the English term "tribunal" here, since tribunals are often not courts, but rather non-judicial entities that exercise quasi-judicial functions. An example would be the Employment Tribunals in England and Wales.
Selected response from:

Rebecca Jowers
Spain
Local time: 22:32
Grading comment
Thank you for your response and comments!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +3multi-judge court
Rebecca Jowers
4 +1If you are sure
Manuel Cedeño Berrueta
3judicial panel
Juan Arturo Blackmore Zerón
3Full Court
John Druce


Discussion entries: 7





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Full Court


Explanation:
Perhaps the distinction between the one-judge and three-judge court could be made by referring to the former as a "Court" and the latter as a "Full Court", explaining in parentheses the first time you use this term.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Full_Court

John Druce
Spain
Local time: 22:32
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
judicial panel


Explanation:
It might be like this.


    Reference: http://https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judicial_panel
Juan Arturo Blackmore Zerón
Mexico
Local time: 15:32
Works in field
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in category: 57
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59 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
multi-judge court


Explanation:
Publications from the US Federal Judicial Center use "single-judge court" for what in most Spanish-speaking jurisdictions are called "juzgados," and "mult-judge court" for "tribunales" (courts with more than one sitting judge, often three, who sit in panels).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2019-02-27 20:47:01 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I don't think I would use the English term "tribunal" here, since tribunals are often not courts, but rather non-judicial entities that exercise quasi-judicial functions. An example would be the Employment Tribunals in England and Wales.

Rebecca Jowers
Spain
Local time: 22:32
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 2210
Grading comment
Thank you for your response and comments!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yvonne Gallagher: Yep!//And term "Tribunal" often collocated with "of Inquiry". And nothing to do with 3 as Charles pointed out.
27 mins
  -> Thanks, Yvonne

agree  Charles Davis: Clear and straightforward. The number shouldn't be mentioned; it can be 3, 5, 7 or even 9, depending on context. (I like the photo!) // Exactly: seven in the current Catalan case, for example.
31 mins
  -> Thanks, Charles. And, certainly, judges often sit in panels of three but, in the Supremo for example, there may be five or seven magistrados

agree  AllegroTrans
1 day 13 hrs
  -> Thanks, Allegro
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1 day 51 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
If you are sure


Explanation:
If you are sure that in your text “juzgado” refers to a “one-judge court”, and “tribunal” refers to a “three-judge court”, you will be safe using these terms.

But this is not necessarily the case.

“Tribunal” and “juzgado” are used interchangeably in Venezuela, and I understand that it is more or less the same in Argentina.

The Diccionario de Ciencias Jurídicas, Políticas y Sociales de Manuel Ossorio (Edit. Heliasta, Buenos Aires, 2004) defines these terms as follows:

Tribunal: Magistrado o conjunto de magistrados que ejercen la función jurisdiccional, sea en el orden civil, en el penal, en el laboral, en el administrativo o en otro fuero, y cualquier que sea su categoría jerárquica.
Se llama unipersonal cuando está constituido por un solo juez, y colegiado cuando lo integran tres o más jueces.

Juzgado: Tribunal de un solo juez
---------

This Argentinean site also deals with the concepts of “juzgado” and “tribunal”:

La Jurisdicción Penal: (http://www.eco.unlpam.edu.ar/objetos/materias/abogacia/3-ano...
(See “El Tribunal – Concepto” and “El Tribunal – Su Composición”)
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In English, I have seen “one-judge court” for “juzgado/ tribunal unipersonal”, “three-judge court * three-judge panel” for “tribunal colegiado (de tres jueces)”
(http://www.txcourts.gov/media/1243989/December-11-2015-Trans... and “multi-judge court” for courts with more than three judges (such as Supreme Courts, which have 15 or more judges).


Manuel Cedeño Berrueta
Local time: 16:32
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 402

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  AllegroTrans: If
59 mins
  -> Thank you, Chris
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