Se Lumen Proferre / "Sufragio Efectivo. No Reeleccion"

20:13 Jul 31, 2000
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Law/Patents
Spanish term or phrase: Se Lumen Proferre / "Sufragio Efectivo. No Reeleccion"
Los dos aparecen despues de la despida, o sea despues de atentamente.

(Note you guys have been very helpful to me today. I don't know what steps to follow to award the points. If its not too much to ask, can you advise? Thanks. Jean
Jean Williams


Summary of answers provided
naThey are both boilerplate in Mexico
Alexandro Padres Jimenez
na"May justice prevail" < more below >
Heathcliff
naEffective Suffrage, Not Re-Election
meridacath
na"Se Lumen Proferre / "Sufragio Efectivo. No Reeleccion""
Baruch Avidar


  

Answers


3 hrs
"Se Lumen Proferre / "Sufragio Efectivo. No Reeleccion""


Explanation:
"Se Lumen Proferre" :
Let the light/the clarity prevail(propagate)
Note: Source text is Latin

"Sufragio Efectivo" :
Effective election/vote/voting.

"No Reeleccion":
No reelection

Good luck!


    Reference: http://tis.consilium.eu.int
Baruch Avidar
Israel
Local time: 17:07
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 92

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Alvin Adams, Jr (X)
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9 hrs
Effective Suffrage, Not Re-Election


Explanation:
I have seen this phrase used as a standard closing on all correspondence from various governmental departments. Re-election is periodically a political hot potato here in Mexico.

I don't think I would translate the Latin, just leave it.

Cathy.

meridacath
PRO pts in pair: 10

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Alvin Adams, Jr (X)
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10 hrs
"May justice prevail" < more below >


Explanation:
This first phrase is a Latin motto: literally, "Let the light shine forth." As with most Latin tags in legal documents, it can be left in the original language (or not, at the translator's discretion).

"Effective suffrage, no re-election" is fine as far as it goes, but what exactly does it MEAN? That the person in question has been elected to office only for one term, and cannot be elected again, or that the election in which he gained his office didn't have to be held again (presumably because of some irregularity in the process)? -- I usually say "Duly elected - not subject to recount". It's a somewhat loose rendering, but I think conveys the essence of the situation. -- Alex Padres, are you reading this? Any thoughts?

Heathcliff
United States
Local time: 07:07
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 843

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Alvin Adams, Jr (X)
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14 hrs
They are both boilerplate in Mexico


Explanation:
I just usually leave them in Spanish. I mean, this goes back to 1917 in Mexico with the Mexican revolution and truth be told, as stated above, it remains a hot potato. Mexico is known for not allowing Presidential re-election. Only one term is allowed (six years). Effective Voting. No re-election is really the translation in my eyes, but to a non-Mexican it really doesn't mean much. It is similar to when referring in English to a judge and they state "The Honorable John Doe", in Mexico you would just say "El juez Pito Pérez"...

in any event, this is standard phrasing on official documents.

Best of luck!

Alexandro Padres Jimenez
Local time: 10:07
PRO pts in pair: 150

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Alvin Adams, Jr (X)
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