erario

English translation: treasury/ the Exchequer

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:erario
English translation: treasury/ the Exchequer
Entered by: Gabriela Rodriguez

23:43 Apr 28, 2005
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Law: Taxation & Customs
Spanish term or phrase: erario
Debemos destacar que bajo este supuesto, xxx no será susceptible de reclamos por parte del Fisco de multas por omisión de impuesto ni de intereses resarcitorios, ya que nunca hubo materia imponible dejada de ingresar al erario
Paula Gonzal (X)
Local time: 05:08
treasury/ the Exchequer
Explanation:
Suerte!!!!!!!!!!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 mins (2005-04-28 23:48:02 GMT)
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erario m treasury
el erario público, the Exchequer.

treas·ur·y (trĕzh\'ə-rē) pronunciation
n., pl. -ies.

1. A place in which treasure is kept.
2.
1. A place in which private or public funds are received, kept, managed, and disbursed.
2. Such funds or revenues.
3. A collection of literary or artistic treasures: a treasury of English verse.
4. Treasury
1. The department of a government in charge of the collection, management, and expenditure of the public revenue.
2. A security, such as a note, issued by the U.S. Treasury.

[Middle English tresorie, from Old French, from tresor, treasure. See treasure.]
treasury

noun

A place where one keeps one\'s valuables: treasure house. See keep/release.

trea·sury (`tre-zhə-rē, `trā-)
n.

pl -sur·ies

1.
1. A place in which stores of wealth are kept
2. The place of deposit and disbursement of collected funds; esp One where public revenues are deposited, kept, and disbursed
3. Funds kept in such a depository
2. cap
1. A governmental department in charge of finances and esp. the collection, management, and expenditure of public revenues
2. The building in which the business of such a governmental department is transacted
3. cap A government security (as a note or bill) issued by the Treasury.
treasury

For the U.S. government securities, see Treasury security

A treasury is the part of a government which manages all money and revenue. A treasurer is somebody who runs a treasury; although, in some systems (such as the US) the treasurer reports to a secretary of the treasury.
http://www.answers.com/treasury

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 mins (2005-04-28 23:49:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

ex·cheq·uer (ĕks\'chĕk\'ər, ĭks-chĕk\'ər) pronunciation
n.

1. Exchequer The British governmental department charged with the collection and management of the national revenue.
2. Exchequer In Great Britain, the Court of Exchequer.
3. A treasury, as of a nation or an organization.
4. Financial resources; funds.
ex·che·quer (`eks-\'che-kər, iks-`che-)
n.

[Anglo-French eschecker eschequ(i)er, from Old French eschequier royal treasury, reckoning board or cloth marked with squares, literally, chessboard, from eschec chess]

1. cap A royal office in medieval England at first responsible for the collection and management of the royal revenue and later for the adjudication of revenue cases
2. cap A former superior court having law and equity jurisdiction in England and Wales over primarily revenue cases and now merged with the Queen\'s Bench Division of the High Court of Justice called also Court of the Exchequer
- The Exchequer was created in England by the Norman kings. In addition to being divided into a court of common law and a court of equity, at one point the Exchequer also had jurisdiction over all actions, except those involving real property, between two subjects of the Crown. In 1841, the Exchequer\'s equity jurisdiction, except over revenue cases, was transferred to the Court of Chancery, and in 1881 the Exchequer was merged into the Queen\'s Bench Division of the High Court of Justice.
3. often cap The office in Great Britain and Northern Ireland responsible for the collection and care of the national revenue.
Exchequer

The Exchequer was that part of the government responsible for the management and collection of the royal revenues of the King of England. At an early stage (certainly by 1190) it split into a purely administrative part (the Exchequer of Receipt) which collected revenue, and a judicial part the Exchequer of Pleas, which was a court concerned with the King\'s revenue.

Originally the Exchequer referred to a large table, 10 feet by 5, on which counters were placed representing various values. According to the Dialogue concerning the Exchequer -- an early Medieval work describing the practice of the Exchequer -- the name referred to the resemblance of the table with that of a chess board.

The term \"Exchequer\" then came to refer to the twice yearly meetings held at Easter and Michaelmas at which government financial business was transacted and an audit held of sheriff\'s returns.

Under Henry I, the procedure for the audit adopted would involve the Treasurer drawing up a summons which would be sent to each Sheriff, which they would be required to answer. The Treasurer would call on each Sheriff to give account of Royal income in their Shire. The Chancellor of the Exchequer would then question them concerning debts owed by private individuals. The results of the audit were recorded in a series of records known as the Pipe Rolls

The Exchequer became unnecessary as a revenue collecting department as a result of Pitt\'s reforms. It was abolished in 1834. Those government departments collecting revenue paid it directly to the Bank of England

By extension exchequer has come to mean the Treasury; and, colloquially, pecuniary possessions in general; as, \'the company\'s exchequer\' is low.
http://www.answers.com/exchequer
Selected response from:

Gabriela Rodriguez
Argentina
Local time: 05:08
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +6treasury/ the Exchequer
Gabriela Rodriguez
5public coffers
Margarita Palatnik (X)
4public funds
Maria Boschero


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +6
treasury/ the Exchequer


Explanation:
Suerte!!!!!!!!!!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 mins (2005-04-28 23:48:02 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------


erario m treasury
el erario público, the Exchequer.

treas·ur·y (trĕzh\'ə-rē) pronunciation
n., pl. -ies.

1. A place in which treasure is kept.
2.
1. A place in which private or public funds are received, kept, managed, and disbursed.
2. Such funds or revenues.
3. A collection of literary or artistic treasures: a treasury of English verse.
4. Treasury
1. The department of a government in charge of the collection, management, and expenditure of the public revenue.
2. A security, such as a note, issued by the U.S. Treasury.

[Middle English tresorie, from Old French, from tresor, treasure. See treasure.]
treasury

noun

A place where one keeps one\'s valuables: treasure house. See keep/release.

trea·sury (`tre-zhə-rē, `trā-)
n.

pl -sur·ies

1.
1. A place in which stores of wealth are kept
2. The place of deposit and disbursement of collected funds; esp One where public revenues are deposited, kept, and disbursed
3. Funds kept in such a depository
2. cap
1. A governmental department in charge of finances and esp. the collection, management, and expenditure of public revenues
2. The building in which the business of such a governmental department is transacted
3. cap A government security (as a note or bill) issued by the Treasury.
treasury

For the U.S. government securities, see Treasury security

A treasury is the part of a government which manages all money and revenue. A treasurer is somebody who runs a treasury; although, in some systems (such as the US) the treasurer reports to a secretary of the treasury.
http://www.answers.com/treasury

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 mins (2005-04-28 23:49:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

ex·cheq·uer (ĕks\'chĕk\'ər, ĭks-chĕk\'ər) pronunciation
n.

1. Exchequer The British governmental department charged with the collection and management of the national revenue.
2. Exchequer In Great Britain, the Court of Exchequer.
3. A treasury, as of a nation or an organization.
4. Financial resources; funds.
ex·che·quer (`eks-\'che-kər, iks-`che-)
n.

[Anglo-French eschecker eschequ(i)er, from Old French eschequier royal treasury, reckoning board or cloth marked with squares, literally, chessboard, from eschec chess]

1. cap A royal office in medieval England at first responsible for the collection and management of the royal revenue and later for the adjudication of revenue cases
2. cap A former superior court having law and equity jurisdiction in England and Wales over primarily revenue cases and now merged with the Queen\'s Bench Division of the High Court of Justice called also Court of the Exchequer
- The Exchequer was created in England by the Norman kings. In addition to being divided into a court of common law and a court of equity, at one point the Exchequer also had jurisdiction over all actions, except those involving real property, between two subjects of the Crown. In 1841, the Exchequer\'s equity jurisdiction, except over revenue cases, was transferred to the Court of Chancery, and in 1881 the Exchequer was merged into the Queen\'s Bench Division of the High Court of Justice.
3. often cap The office in Great Britain and Northern Ireland responsible for the collection and care of the national revenue.
Exchequer

The Exchequer was that part of the government responsible for the management and collection of the royal revenues of the King of England. At an early stage (certainly by 1190) it split into a purely administrative part (the Exchequer of Receipt) which collected revenue, and a judicial part the Exchequer of Pleas, which was a court concerned with the King\'s revenue.

Originally the Exchequer referred to a large table, 10 feet by 5, on which counters were placed representing various values. According to the Dialogue concerning the Exchequer -- an early Medieval work describing the practice of the Exchequer -- the name referred to the resemblance of the table with that of a chess board.

The term \"Exchequer\" then came to refer to the twice yearly meetings held at Easter and Michaelmas at which government financial business was transacted and an audit held of sheriff\'s returns.

Under Henry I, the procedure for the audit adopted would involve the Treasurer drawing up a summons which would be sent to each Sheriff, which they would be required to answer. The Treasurer would call on each Sheriff to give account of Royal income in their Shire. The Chancellor of the Exchequer would then question them concerning debts owed by private individuals. The results of the audit were recorded in a series of records known as the Pipe Rolls

The Exchequer became unnecessary as a revenue collecting department as a result of Pitt\'s reforms. It was abolished in 1834. Those government departments collecting revenue paid it directly to the Bank of England

By extension exchequer has come to mean the Treasury; and, colloquially, pecuniary possessions in general; as, \'the company\'s exchequer\' is low.
http://www.answers.com/exchequer


    Reference: http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=erar...
Gabriela Rodriguez
Argentina
Local time: 05:08
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Richard Cadena: Public Treasury would make it more complete.
26 mins
  -> Thank you Richard, you are right and good night!!!!!!!!

agree  mirta
34 mins
  -> Muchas gracias Mirta y buenas noches!!!!!!!!!

agree  marybro: yes, public treasury
40 mins
  -> Muchas gracias marybro y buenas noches!!!!!!!!!!

agree  Patricia Fierro, M. Sc.
1 hr
  -> Muchas gracias Patricia y buenas noches!!!!!!!!!!!!!

agree  Leopoldo Gurman: Saludos gaby! =:)
3 hrs
  -> Saludos para vos Leopoldo y que pases un buen finde!!!!!!!!!!!!

agree  Adriana Vozzi
6 days
  -> Muchas gracias avozzi y que tengas un excelente día!!!!!!!!!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
public funds


Explanation:
Suerte!

Maria Boschero
Argentina
Local time: 05:08
Native speaker of: Spanish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day 13 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
public coffers


Explanation:
...

Margarita Palatnik (X)
Local time: 05:08
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 87
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



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