cubiertas para ordeno

English translation: covered for milk production

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:cubiertas para ordeno
English translation:covered for milk production
Entered by: Charles Davis

22:11 Nov 26, 2018
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Livestock / Animal Husbandry / Ovejas y corderos
Spanish term or phrase: cubiertas para ordeno
I could use some help with this phrase: "cubiertas para ordeno"

Here is the sentence:

7 millones de cabezas eran ovejas y corderas cubiertas para aptitud cárnica; un 10% eran ovejas y corderas cubiertas para ordeno; otro 2% eran ovejas no cubiertas.

Thanks in advance!
Poughkeepsie
Spain
Local time: 00:26
tupped for milk production
Explanation:
"Ordeno" has got to be a typo for "ordeño", from ordeñar, to milk, so "para ordeño" means for the purpose of milking; i.e., "for milk production", which seems to be the most common way of expressing it.

"Cubiertas", of course, means mating. The word "cover" can be used for this. In relation to sheep, the expression "put to the ram" is also found. But there is also "tupping", which seems to be used:

"5. The lambing percentage (i.e. the number of Iambs docked as apercentage of ewes tupped) for 51 flocks in 1966/67 averaged 147."
http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/261394/files/northscotlan...

"Hill ewes in the north of England are generally tupped for the first time as shearlings (yearlings following their first wool clip in summer) but the
later maturing Herdwicks are normally tupped for the first time a year later (i.e. as two-shears)."
http://www.foundationforcommonland.org.uk/sites/default/file...

"Production figures are usually expressed as a quantity per 100 ewes which are put to the ram (tupped). Representative figures of lamb performance in the UK are 110 lambs per 100 ewes tupped for mountain farms, 140 for upland farms and 170 for lowland farms"
http://dlib.scu.ac.ir/bitstream/Ebook/87265/2/9781845939731....

I must admit that one reason I like this option is because it reminds me of Othello, when Iago warns Desdemona's father at the beginning that: "Even now, now, very now, an old black ram / Is tupping your white ewe."
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 00:26
Grading comment
Thanks for your help!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +1covered for milking
neilmac
4 +1tupped for milk production
Charles Davis


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
tupped for milk production


Explanation:
"Ordeno" has got to be a typo for "ordeño", from ordeñar, to milk, so "para ordeño" means for the purpose of milking; i.e., "for milk production", which seems to be the most common way of expressing it.

"Cubiertas", of course, means mating. The word "cover" can be used for this. In relation to sheep, the expression "put to the ram" is also found. But there is also "tupping", which seems to be used:

"5. The lambing percentage (i.e. the number of Iambs docked as apercentage of ewes tupped) for 51 flocks in 1966/67 averaged 147."
http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/261394/files/northscotlan...

"Hill ewes in the north of England are generally tupped for the first time as shearlings (yearlings following their first wool clip in summer) but the
later maturing Herdwicks are normally tupped for the first time a year later (i.e. as two-shears)."
http://www.foundationforcommonland.org.uk/sites/default/file...

"Production figures are usually expressed as a quantity per 100 ewes which are put to the ram (tupped). Representative figures of lamb performance in the UK are 110 lambs per 100 ewes tupped for mountain farms, 140 for upland farms and 170 for lowland farms"
http://dlib.scu.ac.ir/bitstream/Ebook/87265/2/9781845939731....

I must admit that one reason I like this option is because it reminds me of Othello, when Iago warns Desdemona's father at the beginning that: "Even now, now, very now, an old black ram / Is tupping your white ewe."


Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 00:26
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 44
Grading comment
Thanks for your help!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  neilmac: With "covered" (I didn't notice you'd posted it).
8 hrs
  -> Cheers, Neil :-) But I didn't choose it in the end, so I can't claim the credit. To tell the truth I don't really hold with this idea that if you mention it somewhere in your explanation it counts, unless you explicitly change your mind.

neutral  Rachel Fell: I think it's a term used in the Lake District, northern England and Scotland - https://www.eastsidecottages.co.uk/journal/what-is-a-tup-and... - yes, I know it from "Othello" too.
10 hrs
  -> Yes, I think you're right. I just like the word and allowed myself to be tempted. "Covered" was my first thought and I should have stuck with that.
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
covered for milking


Explanation:
Although "tup/tupping"may be used among UK farmers (I don't know about elsewhere), I have never come across the term in any of the technical daily journals for which I translate (JDS, JDR…). They tend to use the (perhaps slightly more euphemistic) term "cover" to refer to mating/mounting.


New Techniques in Sheep Production
https://books.google.es/books?isbn=1483162176
I. Fayez M. Marai, ‎J.B. Owen - 2013 - ‎Technology & Engineering
"... associated with more rams serving each oestrous ewe and a greater proportion of ewes covered during the first 2 weeks of joining (Lightfoot and Smith, 1968)."

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Note added at 10 hrs (2018-11-27 08:45:40 GMT)
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NB: And "cover" has been used in this sense since at least the early eighteenth century, right up to the present day:
An Encyclopædia of Agriculture: Comprising the Theory and Practice ...
https://books.google.es/books?id=qeNBAAAAIAAJ
John Claudius Loudon - 1826 - ‎Agriculture
In every case, when the farmer employs rams of his own flock, he is careful to have a few of the best ewes covered by a well formed and fine-woolled ram, for the .

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Note added at 10 hrs (2018-11-27 08:46:17 GMT)
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(With all due respect to Charles and the Bard...)

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Note added at 12 hrs (2018-11-27 10:50:57 GMT)
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I'm afraid I disagree about the frequency of use of "milking". I've done several translations about mechanical/machine milking, and the different setups used. "Milk production" covers the whole process, of which milking is just one specific phase.In fact, I'd say about 80% of the work I do is about dairy rather than meat production.


    https://www.facebook.com/fishclublambs/posts/well-the-second-round-of-lai-ewes-are-almost-finished-lambing-with-one-more-ewe-/10151745033176
neilmac
Spain
Local time: 00:26
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 73

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Charles Davis: Covered is OK, but if we're going to be picky "for milk production" is much more usual than "for milking" when referring to breeding. // Yeah, but milking is necessarily for milk production. Actually "breeding sheep for milk" would probably be best.
9 mins
  -> Yes, ewes will start to produce milk after mating. But there is a difference between milk "production" inside the ewe/cow/goat etc. and the industrial process.
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