Mira de lo que te estás perdiendo

English translation: Colloquial or hyper-corrective "de"

03:05 Jan 29, 2003
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Marketing / Telecommunications/Advertising
Spanish term or phrase: Mira de lo que te estás perdiendo
I am reviewing an English to Spanish translation and the above phrase seems to be quite strange to me.

I want to get some other opinions on this phrase and appreciate any ideas you would like to share with me.

The original English was:

See what you have been missing.

My contention is that the "de" is not necessary and sounds awkward.

So what do you all say? Agree or disagree?

Thanks!

Laura
Laura Hastings
Local time: 15:06
English translation:Colloquial or hyper-corrective "de"
Explanation:
No, I'm not a native speaker but I have a fairly good ear for colloquial usage after 22 years in my bilingual home and constant exposure to native speakers from all countries.

The insertion of a gratuitous "de" is not unusual. Sometimes it is just typical of colloquial or alternative usage. For example: "Es lindo" vs. "¡Es de lindo!" Perhaps someone can explain this better than I, but it just has a different "feel."

This could also be a case of hypercorrection, since the "de" would be necessary for other verbs in the same context. For exmaple:

Mira de lo que te escapaste.

Here the "de" is necessary, since "escaparse de" is the common formula for the verb.

And finally, Spanish speakers sometimes throw in a totally unnecessary "de" as part of the so-called vice of "deísmo," as in "sabe de que," "pienso de que," etc. This could be an instance of that commonly-noted problem.

For "correct" Spanish you could drop the "de."

Hope this helps.

Alan
Selected response from:

Alan Lambson
Local time: 16:06
Grading comment
Hi Alan,
Your answer was perfect, and I appreciate your help on this situation.
Thanks!
Laura
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +5Colloquial or hyper-corrective "de"
Alan Lambson
5 +1Mira lo que te has estado perdiendo
Teresita Garcia Ruy Sanchez
5See what you have been missing = mira de lo que te has estado perdiendo!
Ana-Maria Hulse
5Agree/disagree
Esther Hermida


  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Mira lo que te has estado perdiendo


Explanation:
Espero que te sirva

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-29 03:21:53 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Mira de lo que te has estado perdiendo no suena tan mal


Teresita Garcia Ruy Sanchez
Mexico
Local time: 15:06
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 300

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Esther Hermida
26 mins
  -> ¡Mil gracias Esther!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
Colloquial or hyper-corrective "de"


Explanation:
No, I'm not a native speaker but I have a fairly good ear for colloquial usage after 22 years in my bilingual home and constant exposure to native speakers from all countries.

The insertion of a gratuitous "de" is not unusual. Sometimes it is just typical of colloquial or alternative usage. For example: "Es lindo" vs. "¡Es de lindo!" Perhaps someone can explain this better than I, but it just has a different "feel."

This could also be a case of hypercorrection, since the "de" would be necessary for other verbs in the same context. For exmaple:

Mira de lo que te escapaste.

Here the "de" is necessary, since "escaparse de" is the common formula for the verb.

And finally, Spanish speakers sometimes throw in a totally unnecessary "de" as part of the so-called vice of "deísmo," as in "sabe de que," "pienso de que," etc. This could be an instance of that commonly-noted problem.

For "correct" Spanish you could drop the "de."

Hope this helps.

Alan

Alan Lambson
Local time: 16:06
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 114
Grading comment
Hi Alan,
Your answer was perfect, and I appreciate your help on this situation.
Thanks!
Laura

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Betina Frisone: Couldn't have said better myself! :)
8 mins

agree  GoodWords: I couldn't have said it myself! You've cleared up some doubts about things I hear around me, too.
35 mins

agree  Francisco Herrerias
50 mins

agree  Ricardo Souza
2 hrs

agree  mónica alfonso
8 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

40 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Agree/disagree


Explanation:
I see this is in advertising, so you might have some freedom with words here. In proper written form perhaps it will not be appropriate, as Alan so eloquently pointed out, but if it's emulating everyday conversation perhaps it's okay because that's simply how people talk. I must say I'm guilty as charge.

Esther Hermida
United States
Local time: 15:06
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 157
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
See what you have been missing = mira de lo que te has estado perdiendo!


Explanation:
The only change I'd make is the tense."Have been" es "has estado" and not "estás".
The use of "de lo que" is really opcional. You could also say "mira lo que has estado perdiéndote" As a native, I'd say "mira de lo que te has estado... etc" . I find it much more emphatic. Hope it helps. Ana María

Ana-Maria Hulse
United States
Local time: 15:06
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 61
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