al pie de los caballos

English translation: in ill favour // out of favour // shunned by decent society

18:53 Jul 5, 2011
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Media / Multimedia / note at bottom of medical
Spanish term or phrase: al pie de los caballos
from an article about Kate Moss's high profile wedding:

Pero a esas horas era ya un secreto a voces que la modelo iba a ir vestida por su íntimo amigo John Galliano, el diseñador británico que se encuentra hoy al pie de los caballos, respondiendo ante un tribunal de las acusaciones de racismo anti-judío y confesando sus problemas con el alcohol y el estrés de la creación. Imposible olvidar que la propia Moss estaba también hace no tanto tiempo al pie de los caballos, viendo cómo sus patrocinadores la abandonaban debido a sus problemas con la cocaína. Ella salió a flote y, al vestir Galliano, espera que también él logre superar sus problemas.
ormiston
Local time: 01:36
English translation:in ill favour // out of favour // shunned by decent society
Explanation:
This seems to be the idea.

Suerte.
Selected response from:

Robert Forstag
United States
Local time: 20:36
Grading comment
I also considered 'to fall from grace' so thanks to everyone
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +3in ill favour // out of favour // shunned by decent society
Robert Forstag
4disgraced
James A. Walsh
4currently out of favour/a pariah/outcast (as he shot himself in the foot)
Yvonne Gallagher
4fell from grace
Lindsay Spratt
4between a rock and a hard place / in the unenviable position of
Jenni Lukac (X)
3in the dog house
polyglot45
3in the eye of the storm
moken


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
in ill favour // out of favour // shunned by decent society


Explanation:
This seems to be the idea.

Suerte.

Robert Forstag
United States
Local time: 20:36
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 46
Grading comment
I also considered 'to fall from grace' so thanks to everyone

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  philgoddard: Yes, there's lots of ways of saying this.
1 hr
  -> Thank you, Phil.

agree  Maria Kisic: even blacklisted, ostracized...
8 hrs
  -> Thank you, Maria.

agree  franglish
11 hrs
  -> Thank you, Franglish.
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16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
between a rock and a hard place / in the unenviable position of


Explanation:
The two things that occur to me when I think of John Galliano's situation . . .

Jenni Lukac (X)
Local time: 01:36
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 40

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  philgoddard: These both sound too sympathetic - his problems are self inflicted.
56 mins
  -> Interesting comment, Phil. I took a dry approach but in no way thought it sounded sympathetic. The fellow is, indeed, a wretch.
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
fell from grace


Explanation:
Another option!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2011-07-05 20:09:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

you could also add 'publicly': 'publicly fell from grace'

Lindsay Spratt
Spain
Local time: 01:36
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
currently out of favour/a pariah/outcast (as he shot himself in the foot)


Explanation:
a few options

or just "currently suffering loss of status/prestige"

"pariah" might be a bit strong here although he is a bit of an outcast at the moment

estar alguien a los pies de los caballos.

1. loc. verb. Estar muy abatido y despreciado.


www.significadode.org/pie.htm - Cached
estar alguien a los pies de los caballos. 1. loc. verb. Estar muy abatido y despreciado. estar alguien al pie del cañón. 1. loc. verb. coloq. ...


Yvonne Gallagher
Ireland
Local time: 00:36
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
al pie de los caballos
disgraced


Explanation:

I think 'disgraced' alone will do it. More than 7,000 "direct" hits for "John Galliano, the disgraced British fashion designer".

He ought to be ashamed of himself, if you ask me! Tut tut :)



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2011-07-05 20:28:08 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

...John Galliano, the disgraced British fashion designer who is currently in court on charges of anti-Jewish racism...

Example sentence(s):
  • ...John Galliano, el diseñador británico que se encuentra hoy al pie de los caballos
  • ...John Galliano, the disgraced British fashion designer...

    Reference: http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=&q=%22John+Galliano%2C+the...
James A. Walsh
Spain
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 20
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
in the eye of the storm


Explanation:
Hi Ormiston,

Normally, I'd say be thrown/fed to the lions is a more direct equivalent, but in this case you'd almost have to say that Galliano's fed himself to the lions.

I think in the eye of the storm could be an adequate expression in this particular case.

Rgds,

Álvaro

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2011-07-05 23:06:54 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Along with the meaning Phil's pointed out, I also found the following definitions on http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/storm

the eye of the storm
the center of a disagreement The man in the eye of the storm is accused of selling secrets to the enemy.
Etymology: based on the literal meaning of the eye of the storm (the middle of a mass of severe weather)
Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2003. Reproduced with permission.

be in the eye of the storm
to be very much involved in an argument or problem that affects a lot of people International aid agencies were in the eye of the storm when war broke out in the country.
Cambridge Idioms Dictionary, 2nd ed. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2006. Reproduced with permission.



moken
Local time: 00:36
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  philgoddard: No - this means a brief period of calm, which is the very opposite of what the Spanish says.
1 hr
  -> Aha, I stand corrected then. Thanks Phil. Seems this is used with very opposite meanings though. I just added a reference above.
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12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
in the dog house


Explanation:
pilloried

polyglot45
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
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