L.N.

English translation: Graduate / Licentiate in Nutrition

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:L.N.
English translation:Graduate / Licentiate in Nutrition
Entered by: Charles Davis

06:51 Nov 17, 2013
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Medical (general) / clinical trial staff
Spanish term or phrase: L.N.
the initials L.N. appear as follows in a a clinical study document from MExico.

L.N. Jane Doe Farmacista
Hinara
United States
Local time: 18:04
Graduate / Licentiate in Nutrition
Explanation:
Emiliano has correctly identified the meaning of L.N.: it does stand for "Licenciada en Nutrición":

"Titulo que se otorga: Licenciado en Nutrición
Programa académico: Licenciatura en Nutrición Docente investigador responsable: L.N. Ana María Herrera Medrano"
http://nutricion.uaz.edu.mx/c/document_library/get_file?uuid...

"Ana María Herrera Medrano
Carrera: LICENCIATURA EN NUTRICIÓN"
http://cedula.buholegal.com/4804672/

But the correct translation is definitely not Doctor in Nutrition. Someone with a Doctorado (Ph.D.) in Nutrition could be called that, but not someone with a Licenciatura, which is a first degree. Physicians are entitle to use the title Doctor if they have an postgraduate M.D., a professional rather than a research doctorate, but not nutritionists (or pharmacists), who do not have a medical degree.

Licenciada can simply be translated as "graduate". The correct term is "licenciate", which could be used, though some translators prefer not to on the grounds that it is unfamiliar in English. "Bachelor in Nutrition" would not really be accurate, since a licenciatura, albeit a first degree, is a more advanced qualification than a bachelor's degree. Just "graduate" would do.

In English you would normally put this after the name rather than before.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 hrs (2013-11-17 18:02:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

(Pardon me; I have a bad habit of misspelling "licentiate" in English: it has a t in the middle, not a c as in Spanish.)
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 03:04
Grading comment
Thank you!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4Graduate / Licentiate in Nutrition
Charles Davis
4 +1Doctor in Nutrition
Emiliano Pantoja


  

Answers


23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Doctor in Nutrition


Explanation:
L.N: Licenciada en Nutrición

RDN
http://www.eatright.org/RDN/

Emiliano Pantoja
Spain
Local time: 03:04
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sara Ruiz
3 hrs
  -> Gracias
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Graduate / Licentiate in Nutrition


Explanation:
Emiliano has correctly identified the meaning of L.N.: it does stand for "Licenciada en Nutrición":

"Titulo que se otorga: Licenciado en Nutrición
Programa académico: Licenciatura en Nutrición Docente investigador responsable: L.N. Ana María Herrera Medrano"
http://nutricion.uaz.edu.mx/c/document_library/get_file?uuid...

"Ana María Herrera Medrano
Carrera: LICENCIATURA EN NUTRICIÓN"
http://cedula.buholegal.com/4804672/

But the correct translation is definitely not Doctor in Nutrition. Someone with a Doctorado (Ph.D.) in Nutrition could be called that, but not someone with a Licenciatura, which is a first degree. Physicians are entitle to use the title Doctor if they have an postgraduate M.D., a professional rather than a research doctorate, but not nutritionists (or pharmacists), who do not have a medical degree.

Licenciada can simply be translated as "graduate". The correct term is "licenciate", which could be used, though some translators prefer not to on the grounds that it is unfamiliar in English. "Bachelor in Nutrition" would not really be accurate, since a licenciatura, albeit a first degree, is a more advanced qualification than a bachelor's degree. Just "graduate" would do.

In English you would normally put this after the name rather than before.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 hrs (2013-11-17 18:02:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

(Pardon me; I have a bad habit of misspelling "licentiate" in English: it has a t in the middle, not a c as in Spanish.)

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 03:04
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 696
Grading comment
Thank you!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yvonne Becker
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Yvonne :)

agree  neilmac: Graduate (I doubt they'd give away doctorates so easily...)
3 hrs
  -> Cheers, Neil ;)

agree  Joseph Tein: Nice work again. I've been sending acronym updates to Cosnautas when I come across something they don't have (like your recent MLM). Do you want to do that? If not, I'll send this one to them.
5 hrs
  -> Thanks, Joseph :) Please go ahead, if you wouldn't mind.

agree  Phoenix III
12 hrs
  -> Thanks, Phoenix :)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



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