talón derecho

English translation: right heel

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:talón derecho
English translation:right heel
Entered by: Robert Forstag

20:17 Jul 5, 2018
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Medical (general) / Pathology / Anatomy / Autopsy findings / Entry bullet wound / Panama
Spanish term or phrase: talón derecho
From an autopsy report of a suicide victim who died from a bullet wound to the head. Therefore "talón" clearly refers to a part of the head or skull, but I´ve not been able to find the translations through the usual procedures. (Apologies in advance if I´ve been derelict.)

Orificio de entrada: De forma estrellada y bordes oscuros se encuentra a 161 centímetros del talón derecho y a 12 centímetros de la línea media anterior.
Robert Forstag
United States
Local time: 19:11
right heel
Explanation:
Note that the wound is 161 centimetres from the "talón derecho". That's 5 feet 3 inches. In other words, consistent with the distance from the heel to a head wound.

It seems that in some places, at least, the heel is used as a reference point for located wounds in autopsies. Here's an example in English:

"Firearm entry wound, oval shaped, measuring 2.2 x 1.8 cms, surrounded by reddish colored abrasion ring, was present on the back of the right wrist, just below the styloid process of the radius, 98 cms from the right heel."
https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/16c8/0d68b20f27629c0e212fb1...

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Note added at 16 mins (2018-07-05 20:34:24 GMT)
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Typo above: for "locating wounds", not "located wounds"
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 01:11
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +11right heel
Charles Davis


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +11
right heel


Explanation:
Note that the wound is 161 centimetres from the "talón derecho". That's 5 feet 3 inches. In other words, consistent with the distance from the heel to a head wound.

It seems that in some places, at least, the heel is used as a reference point for located wounds in autopsies. Here's an example in English:

"Firearm entry wound, oval shaped, measuring 2.2 x 1.8 cms, surrounded by reddish colored abrasion ring, was present on the back of the right wrist, just below the styloid process of the radius, 98 cms from the right heel."
https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/16c8/0d68b20f27629c0e212fb1...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 16 mins (2018-07-05 20:34:24 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Typo above: for "locating wounds", not "located wounds"

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 01:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 720
Notes to answerer
Asker: I really should have been able to figure this out myself. I feel like such a heel! Thanks so much, Charles. :)


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  lorenab23: Exactly!
2 mins
  -> Thanks, Lorena :-) It seems a little odd to me. The tip of the nose seems like a better point to measure from, but there you go!

agree  Marie Wilson: Yes, the key is in the cm.
3 mins
  -> That's it! Thanks, Marie :-)

agree  Cecilia Gowar: Yes, that is what I said above.
8 mins
  -> Thanks, Cecilia :-) So I see.

agree  Joseph Tein: Yes. And just to really cinch it: https://dictionary.reverso.net/spanish-english/talon
52 mins
  -> Thanks, Joseph :-) Though it's fair to admit that anatomical terms can sometimes refer to more than part of the body: senos, amígdala (which I recently saw translated as "tonsil" when it referred to the one in the brain).

agree  Muriel Vasconcellos: It might help to say something like 'measuring from the right heel'
54 mins
  -> Thanks, Muriel :-) You could add that, though I don't think it's unclear without it.

agree  JohnMcDove: My guess is that it has to do with Mythology, "Achilles' heel" and all that jazz..., but take it with a grain (well, a ton) of salt... It is all Greek to me! ;-)
1 hr
  -> Better the heel than the toe, I suppose: at least the heel stays in one place. Thanks, John :-)

agree  Andy Watkinson: "As every schoolboy knows...."
5 hrs
  -> Well, yes, but... Thanks, Andy :-)

agree  franglish
11 hrs
  -> Thanks, franglish :-)

agree  John Druce
11 hrs
  -> Thanks, John :-)

agree  Chema Nieto Castañón: Definitely correct and definitely not as straightforward as one might think now ;) Good one!
17 hrs
  -> Thanks very much, Chema :-)

agree  Helena Chavarria: By the way, my nursing sister recently corrected me when I mentioned 'autopsies'. She told me that in Britain they're called 'post mortems'.
19 hrs
  -> Quite right! That was a bit of inadvertent Spanglish, or maybe an Americanism. Thanks, Helena :-)
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