Médico

16:18 Aug 8, 2018
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Medical (general) / Certificado de ética (profesional)
Spanish term or phrase: Médico
Buenas tardes a todos, me encuentro traduciendo del español al inglés un certificado en el cual consta que un profesional, en este caso un médico en Argentina, no cometió ningún tipo de incumplimiento ni infracción respecto a la ley y Código de ética profesional.

Mi consulta es la siguiente: médico al inglés puede ser traducido como Physician, que tengo entendido, es el término más "formal", y también Medical doctor si quiero ser más genérica. ¿Hay alguien que tenga experiencia en este tipo de certificados y qué es lo que más se usa en inglés? Mi duda es entre estos dos términos puntualmente.

La frase puntual es la siguiente:

"El Ministerio de Salud certifica que XXXX se encuentra registrado/a como MÉDICO/A - Título: MÉDICO/A bajo la matrícula (...)"

Desde ya agradezco a quien me pueda ayudar.

Saludos,
Mariela.
Maru_afer
Local time: 08:15


Summary of answers provided
4 +4Physician
liz askew
4 +3UK: medical practitioner / medical doctor
Charles Davis


Discussion entries: 15





  

Answers


16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
UK: medical practitioner / medical doctor


Explanation:
The word "médico/a" here refers to any qualified doctor with a medical degree. In Argentina, "cirujano/a" does not appear among the categories in which a doctor can be registered. It follows that the category of "médico/a" includes surgeons as well as other kinds of doctor.

In a translation intended for US readers, "physician" would be perfectly suitable here, because in the US it means any qualified practising medical doctor. Those who work primarily as surgeons are therefore physicians, though they are usually referred to as surgeons:

"All doctors practicing in the United States receive a similar education [...] However, most will pursue specialized training in a specific field of medicine. Many of these areas of practice involve surgery, and their practitioners are referred to as surgeons. Those who perform little or no surgery are simply referred to as physicians. All surgeons are physicians, but not all physicians are surgeons."
https://work.chron.com/difference-between-physician-surgeon-...

In the UK, however, this is not the case. In non-technical language, "physician" is just a formal word for "medical doctor", but in the UK medical profession a physician is not just any doctor, but a specialist in some branch of general or internal medicine. I have posted several sources in the discussion area; Let me quote again what the Royal College of Surgeons says about this:

"What is a physician?
This page gives a description of a physician's role and how it differs from other specialties, and an overview of the role the RCP plays in a physician's career.
In the simplest terms, a physician is a doctor who practises medicine, works primarily in a hospital setting and uses mostly non-surgical methods of treatment. Many doctors choose to work as physicians, as it covers most internal medicine and its sub-specialties. Other fields to specialise in aside from medicine include: obstetrics and gynaecology, psychiatry, surgery, paediatrics and general practice."
https://www.rcplondon.ac.uk/education-practice/advice/what-p...

There is therefore a real risk that if you translate "médico/a" as "physician" for a UK audience, it will be understood that the person concerned does not work in one of the other specialities mentioned here, but an Argentine health professional registered as "médico/a" may well do so.

In practice, "physician" is often used in the UK to refer to any kind of doctor; the British Medical Association itself says: "A physician is a general term for someone who practices medicine, they will usually have a specialist area"
https://www.bma.org.uk/-/media/files/pdfs/about the bma/how ...

But in British professional usage the term "Physician" specifically excludes surgeons; they are two different categories:

"This is an answer from the Royal college of surgeons in UK
In most other parts of the world all medical practitioners, physicians and surgeons alike, are referred to as Dr while in the UK surgeons are usually referred to as Mr/Miss/Ms/Mrs."
https://www.quora.com/Why-in-the-UK-do-surgeons-not-have-the...

"In the United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland, and parts of the Commonwealth, consultant is the title of a senior hospital-based physician or surgeon who has completed all of his or her specialist training and been placed on the specialist register in their chosen speciality."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Consultant_(medicine)

In the UK, a surgeon is not a physician; you are one or the other.

I think, therefore, that for a UK audience "physician" would be a misleading translation here, because it doesn't match the category of "médico/a" in this Argentine text. Whether this particular individual is actually a "physician" in British terms is irrelevant; we need a translation that is accurate and not open to misunderstanding in the target country.

So I suggest "medical practitioner" or "medical doctor". In practice, is normal to say that someone is registered with the General Medical Council simply as a "doctor", but I would be inclined to add "medical", if only because it is a bit more formal.

"Ultrasound practitioners who are medically qualified will be registered with the GMC as a doctor with a licence to practise."
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK402226/

The term "medical doctor" is suggested here even for the US by Elena Sgarbossa, a former Proz.com contributor who is uniquely qualified to offer an opinion, as a distinguished Argentine cardiologist registered in the US:
https://www.proz.com/kudoz/spanish_to_english/medical_genera...

And if you look for the expressions "registered as a medical doctor" and "registered as a medical practitioner" you will find many examples referring to the UK, Ireland and other countries.

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Note added at 17 hrs (2018-08-09 09:34:51 GMT)
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Error in paragraph 4 above: when I wrote " Let me quote again what the Royal College of Surgeons says about this", I meant "the Royal College of Physicians".

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 13:15
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 680

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Dr. Jane Marshall: The GMC uses "medical practitioner" or "doctor". I´d also agree with you comments about "physician", for a UK audience, possibly being interpreted as a member of RCP.
9 mins
  -> Thank you very much, Jane :-)

agree  liz askew: I think usage is superseding strict definitions. However, I would agree with "medical practitioner" above all.
6 hrs
  -> Hi Liz. No; it's for the UK. I assumed it was for the US at first, but then the asker told us in the discussion that it was for the UK. I wouldn't have posted an answer otherwise. // Many thanks :-)

agree  Rosa Paredes
14 hrs
  -> Many thanks, Rosa :-)
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1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Physician


Explanation:
..

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Note added at 1 day 6 mins (2018-08-09 16:25:09 GMT)
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Feedback
Web results
What is a physician? | RCP London
https://www.rcplondon.ac.uk/education-practice/advice/what-p...
12 Aug 2015 - In the simplest terms, a physician is a doctor who practises medicine, works primarily in a hospital setting and uses mostly non-surgical methods of treatment. ... Physicians treat all sorts of ailments but usually specialise in a particular area of medicine.

What is a physician?
Details
Reading time: 1 minute
Date: 12 August 2015
RCP Building
This page gives a description of a physician's role and how it differs from other specialties, and an overview of the role the RCP plays in a physician's career.

In the simplest terms, a physician is a doctor who practises medicine, works primarily in a hospital setting and uses mostly non-surgical methods of treatment. Many doctors choose to work as physicians, as it covers most internal medicine and its sub-specialties. Other fields to specialise in aside from medicine include: obstetrics and gynaecology, psychiatry, surgery, paediatrics and general practice.

Physicians treat all sorts of ailments but usually specialise in a particular area of medicine. By specialising, the physician is marking themselves as both a student of and an expert in a particular type of medicine (eg geriatric medicine). These are known as medical specialties. The RCP covers 30 medical specialties and offers support and training in these areas to its members.



What are the medical specialties that physicians cover?

Acute medicine
Allergy
Audiological medicine
Cardiology
Clinical genetics
Clinical neurophysiology
Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics
Dermatology
Endocrinology and diabetes mellitus
Gastroenterology
General (internal) medicine
Genitourinary medicine
Geriatric medicine
Haematology
Immunology
Infectious diseases
Medical oncology
Medical ophthalmology
Metabolic medicine
Neurology
Nuclear medicine
Paediatric cardiology
Palliative medicine
Pharmaceutical medicine
Rehabilitation medicine
Renal medicine
Respiratory medicine
Rheumatology
Sport and exercise medicine
Stroke medicine

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Note added at 1 day 13 mins (2018-08-09 16:32:36 GMT)
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AND

As for the USA, see:
https://work.chron.com/difference-between-physician-surgeon-...
The Difference Between a Physician & a Surgeon
by Fred Decker; Updated March 16, 2018

All doctors practicing in the United States receive a similar education, whether they attend medical college and become an M.D., or an osteopathic college and become a D.O. However, most will pursue specialized training in a specific field of medicine. Many of these areas of practice involve surgery, and their practitioners are referred to as surgeons. Those who perform little or no surgery are simply referred to as physicians. All surgeons are physicians, but not all physicians are surgeons.
Training Similarities and Differences
All doctors begin their careers in a four-year undergraduate pre-medical program, earning a bachelor of science degree that satisfies the prerequisites for medical or osteopathic college. Those schools represent the next step, a four-year doctorate combining hands-on clinical experience with classroom instruction in physiology, pharmacology, organic chemistry, medical ethics and related topics.
At graduation, the newly minted doctor must choose an accredited residency program in one or another area of practice. This is where career paths for physicians and surgeons diverge. Physicians spend their residencies practicing medicine under the supervision of experienced practitioners, while surgeons spend theirs learning a range of surgical techniques appropriate to their specialty.
What Physicians Do
Physicians may be specialists or practice primary care. Primary care physicians are generalists, such as family doctors, gynecologists and pediatricians. They build long-term relationships with their patients, counseling them on wellness and lifestyle choices, as well as treating their illnesses.
Specialists focus on specific diseases, such as cancers or breathing disorders, or specific parts of the body, such as the digestive system or heart. They typically see patients for specific conditions, rather than providing general care. Both types of physicians treat illnesses, injuries and other conditions with medicines, physical therapy and other non-surgical techniques.
What Surgeons Do
Surgeons perform many of the same duties as other physicians, recording patients' medical histories and diagnosing illnesses, injuries and other conditions. However, while physicians' therapies typically encourage the body to heal itself, surgeons act directly to correct illnesses, injuries and deformities.
Working through open incisions in the traditional way with scalpels, or with tiny instruments inserted into the body through fine tubes or, increasingly, with the aid of robots, surgeons cut, fuse and reshape the body's tissues to restore proper function. General surgeons can operate on any part of the body. Many surgeons specialize, though, either on one part of the body or on diseases like cancer.
Comparative Income
The median annual survey for physicians and surgeons, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, was over $208,000 as of May 2016. A median salary is the midpoint in a list of salaries for one occupation, with half earning more than the median and half earning less. Surgeons are among the highest paid doctors, with a median salary of $409,665. In comparison, family practice physicians earned $230,456; psychiatrists earned $255,543; and anesthesiologists earned $453,687.



I think there is a bit of hair-splitting going on here.

liz askew
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:15
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 3987

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Joseph Tein: Claro que sí.
1 min

agree  philgoddard
19 mins

neutral  Charles Davis: Not for the UK, and this is NOT hairsplitting.
1 hr

agree  Muriel Vasconcellos: Despite the specialized use in the UK, the World Health Organization uses 'physician' for all MDs.
3 hrs
  -> Indeed. Thank you!

agree  J. Ignacio Ahumada: Por supuesto.
23 hrs
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