Presente. (in medical report)

English translation: [eliminate, no comparable translation]

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:Presente. (in medical report)
English translation:[eliminate, no comparable translation]
Entered by: Consult Couture

15:26 Apr 28, 2005
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Medical: Health Care / medical history from Mexico
Spanish term or phrase: Presente. (in medical report)
I looked in the Proz glossaries, but I don't know if "By hand" fits this context.

"Presente" appears after the physician's name, like so:

[date]

[Dr.]
Presente.

Estudio efectuado a: [patient]
Consult Couture
United States
Local time: 03:38
please see note
Explanation:
I would eliminate it and just leave the doctor's name. it really doesn´t mean anything, I think, it's just the heading of a note or a letter. good luck!
Selected response from:

Desdemona
Local time: 05:38
Grading comment
Thank you!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +7please see note
Desdemona
5hereby
Andrea Macarie
5present / here....in person.
Xenia Wong
4((It means that the addressee is suppossed to be in town...
Ricardo Eid
3on duty
posada
3On call
teju


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
hereby


Explanation:
no se si encaja en tu contexto

Andrea Macarie
Spain
Local time: 10:38
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian, Native in HungarianHungarian
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
On call


Explanation:
One of the definitions that I found, was "on duty", for a medical report, I would use "on call", it just means that he was the doctor present, on call, when the report was prepared.

teju
Local time: 02:38
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 16
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6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
on duty


Explanation:
Parece.

posada
Local time: 03:38
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
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6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
please see note


Explanation:
I would eliminate it and just leave the doctor's name. it really doesn´t mean anything, I think, it's just the heading of a note or a letter. good luck!

Desdemona
Local time: 05:38
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
Thank you!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alicia Casal
1 min
  -> Thanks, Alicia.

agree  GoodWords: It originally used to mean what Ricardo says, but now it is a vestige used on any formal letter in Mexico, regardless of the method of delivery. Basically a meaningless formality-- leave it out.
14 mins
  -> Thanks.

agree  Beth Farkas
52 mins
  -> Thanks, Beth

agree  margaret caulfield
53 mins
  -> Thanks!

agree  Elena Sgarbo (X): Yes, here in the US there's no formula in medical reports that compares to "presente" -- none it's needed
1 hr
  -> Thanks!

agree  Ricardo Eid: When thsender was not sure fhat the addresse was in town, he/she appended a "Ciudad" or alinestating the name of the correspondinglocality.
1 hr
  -> Thanks!

neutral  cebice: Like Teju says: it means he is "on call". I think it's very important!
2 hrs
  -> I don´t think it means that, I think it's ADRESSED to the doctor whose name appears there. The person who signs the report or who carried out the tests is SENDING them to this doctor, so it's just a formality, saying DrXXX, Presente, instead of an address

agree  Hugo Silva: I agree with you... it means nothing but a formality. It doesn´t mean that the physician is on call or anything like that. It is used in any type of letters... Just leave it out...:-))
3 hrs
  -> thanks, Hugo.
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
((It means that the addressee is suppossed to be in town...


Explanation:
... where the sender is, too. It is not much used now.))

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2005-04-28 15:37:38 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"Presente\" seems to have been a line to remind the post office workers, those people who classify letters, that it wass to be delivered locally. At least, that\'s the way I understand it.

Ricardo Eid
Local time: 04:38
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
present / here....in person.


Explanation:
I believe it means that the person signing is present physically.

Xenia Wong
Local time: 03:38
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 32

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  GoodWords: Refers to the recipient, not the sender.
9 mins
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