corpulento laúd

English translation: portly lute / big-bodied lute

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:corpulento laúd
English translation:portly lute / big-bodied lute
Entered by: sumire

20:13 May 27, 2018
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Music / Guitar
Spanish term or phrase: corpulento laúd
This appears in a brief history of the guitar.
All suggestions are welcome.
Thank you.
sumire
United States
portly lute / big-bodied lute
Explanation:
This is a modernised quotation from the Libro de buen amor (1330-1343) by Juan Ruiz, Arcipreste de Hita: one of the great classics of Spanish literature.

It is from stanza 1228:

"El corpudo alaút, que tyen' punto á la trisca"
https://www.gutenberg.org/files/16625/16625-h/ii.html

Or in a more modern spelling:

"El corpudo laud que tiene punto a la trisca".

I have cited the latter from a study by one of the great experts on the subject, James T. Monroe or the University of California, Berkeley, who offers this translation:

"The portly lute accompanies a rustic dance"
James T. Monroe, "Arabic Literary Elements in the Structure of the Libro de buen amor (I)", Al-Qantara, 332 (2011): 27-70 (p. 31).
http://al-qantara.revistas.csic.es/index.php/al-qantara/arti...
But a number of people have translated this. The trouble is that the translations are mostly not available online. However, another occurs in a PhD dissertation on the guitar:

"The big-bodied lute keeping tempo"
https://myslide.es/documents/the-musicologist-behind-the-com...

"Corpulent lute" would be OK if you prefer.

And "fat-bellied" would be right according to the notes in the Clásicos Castellanos, which describe the "corpudo alaut" as an "instrumento de cuerdas arábigo, panzudo"
https://books.google.es/books?id=AQ5QRqSLG4MC&pg=PT598&lpg=P...
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 12:20
Grading comment
Thank you for your answer and references. It really helps a lot.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +2portly lute / big-bodied lute
Charles Davis


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
portly lute / big-bodied lute


Explanation:
This is a modernised quotation from the Libro de buen amor (1330-1343) by Juan Ruiz, Arcipreste de Hita: one of the great classics of Spanish literature.

It is from stanza 1228:

"El corpudo alaút, que tyen' punto á la trisca"
https://www.gutenberg.org/files/16625/16625-h/ii.html

Or in a more modern spelling:

"El corpudo laud que tiene punto a la trisca".

I have cited the latter from a study by one of the great experts on the subject, James T. Monroe or the University of California, Berkeley, who offers this translation:

"The portly lute accompanies a rustic dance"
James T. Monroe, "Arabic Literary Elements in the Structure of the Libro de buen amor (I)", Al-Qantara, 332 (2011): 27-70 (p. 31).
http://al-qantara.revistas.csic.es/index.php/al-qantara/arti...
But a number of people have translated this. The trouble is that the translations are mostly not available online. However, another occurs in a PhD dissertation on the guitar:

"The big-bodied lute keeping tempo"
https://myslide.es/documents/the-musicologist-behind-the-com...

"Corpulent lute" would be OK if you prefer.

And "fat-bellied" would be right according to the notes in the Clásicos Castellanos, which describe the "corpudo alaut" as an "instrumento de cuerdas arábigo, panzudo"
https://books.google.es/books?id=AQ5QRqSLG4MC&pg=PT598&lpg=P...

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 12:20
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 208
Grading comment
Thank you for your answer and references. It really helps a lot.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Chema Nieto Castañón: I like portly lute in spite of the meanings added. Also stout ("bulky in body"). That is the idea anyhow. Saludos! // :))
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Chema! I like it too: gordo, en buen romance :-)

agree  philgoddard
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Phil :-)
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