Esa es una palabra dominguera

English translation: That's a $64 (dollar) word

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:Esa es una palabra dominguera
English translation:That's a $64 (dollar) word
Entered by: Henry Hinds

19:37 Jun 5, 2008
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Other / Jargon - coloquial phrase
Spanish term or phrase: Esa es una palabra dominguera
Una palabra no comun, una palabra no usado mucho.
Michael Purscell
Local time: 18:48
That's a $64 (dollar) word
Explanation:
From the $64 dollar question, from many years back.

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Note added at 7 minutos (2008-06-05 19:44:27 GMT)
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29-56 DCM_085576.inddEscalation is no longer a $64 word, uttered to stump the audience. ..... The phrase ‘a $64 word’ refers to the television game show The $64000 Question, in ...
dcm.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/2/1/29.pdf

But I think it was only $64 back then, not $64,000.
Selected response from:

Henry Hinds
United States
Local time: 16:48
Grading comment
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +3That's a fancy word
Karin Kutscher
5That's a $64 (dollar) word
Henry Hinds
4Woooooh, swallowed a dictionary have we?
Lisa McCarthy
3 +1That's a highfalutin or la-di-da way of saying it
Lucy Phillips
3that's a pompous / extravagant / pretentious word
Salloz


Discussion entries: 7





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
That's a fancy word


Explanation:
.

Karin Kutscher
Local time: 20:48
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4
Notes to answerer
Asker: What I'm looking for is a word that carries the same colloquial register in English


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Julio Bereciartu: Agree.
4 mins

agree  Lydia De Jorge
7 mins

agree  Maria Ramon
50 mins
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
That's a $64 (dollar) word


Explanation:
From the $64 dollar question, from many years back.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 minutos (2008-06-05 19:44:27 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

29-56 DCM_085576.inddEscalation is no longer a $64 word, uttered to stump the audience. ..... The phrase ‘a $64 word’ refers to the television game show The $64000 Question, in ...
dcm.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/2/1/29.pdf

But I think it was only $64 back then, not $64,000.

Henry Hinds
United States
Local time: 16:48
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 714
Notes to answerer
Asker: This is exactly the idea I'm looking for; some colloquial equivalent in English.

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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
That's a highfalutin or la-di-da way of saying it


Explanation:
I think 'highfalutin' or 'la-di-da' might fit here - depends on the context. I know exactly what highfalutin means but I'm not sure that I would ever say it - write it, yes!

Lucy Phillips
United Kingdom
Local time: 23:48
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  marybro: highfalutin word/vocabulary (:>)
6 hrs
  -> thanks, marybro!
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
that's a pompous / extravagant / pretentious word


Explanation:
Opciones.

Salloz
Mexico
Local time: 17:48
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4
Notes to answerer
Asker: What I'm looking for is a word that carries the same colloquial register in English

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19 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Woooooh, swallowed a dictionary have we?


Explanation:
That's the expression I'm used to hearing! (not directed at me though :)

Lots of hits on Google as it's a common colloquial expression.

To Basingstoke vb. The act of adding Tomato Ketchup to a meal. So named after the town in Southern England UK where people mainly add ketchup to their food. However it is refered to as “Red sauce” Reason?: They arn’t allowed to use words as ‘posh’ as ‘ketchup’ in case the studio audience in their head goes wooooooh or someone says, “**Woooooh, swallowed a dictionary have we?”** You might ask why the alternative and dumbed down name is red sauce rather than simply “Tomato Sauce”?
http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Basingstoke


Colloq. phr. to have swallowed the (or a) dictionary: to use long or recondite words.
http://www.bl.uk/learning/resources/oed/50063589(2).htm


Iron Council is a breathtaking book. It is many-layered and dense -- and dammit, the man has a habit of using words I've never even read, and you know, they make perfect sense where he has casually tossed them. People have accused me of having **swallowed a dictionary** when I was five years old, because of a similar proclivity -- but Miéville not only swallowed four dictionaries, but also at least two comprehensive thesauri.
http://www.sfsite.com/10a/ic185.htm




Lisa McCarthy
Spain
Local time: 00:48
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 153
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