pepla/plepa

English translation: reject

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:pepla/plepa
English translation:reject
Entered by: Rachel Freeman

10:33 May 10, 2012
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Poetry & Literature / Idioms and Sayings
Spanish term or phrase: pepla/plepa
Hi Folks. Yet another question. This is from a Spanish anthology of plays, the author wants universal English. In this play a group of ghosts are dicussing what has happened in Spain since they died. In this scene a news agency owner is talking with his reporter about an aid worker organization.

A: Ve acercándote a la sección de programas externos solidarios libres y sostenibles para preparar a los cooperantes, que nos vienen cada *“pepla”* con los caros que cuestan, y luego como el gitano que iba a vender el burro, y le hablaba como si fuera una persona! que yo tenga que decir que tu eres bueno!
B: *Plepa*, se dice *plepa* como esos dos, ahora cualquiera vale para reportero, excelentísimo señor agente A (le hace una reverencia).

According to the Larousse Spanish dictionary:
pepla
sustantivo femenino Persona, animal o cosa que tiene muchos defectos.
TAMBIÉN plepa

Does anyone know how to put this idea into English? Thank you all in advance!
Rachel Freeman
Spain
Local time: 07:37
"reject"
Explanation:
a reject is a substandard item coming off a production line, could be humorous here to allude to people and animals
Selected response from:

Bubo Coroman (X)
Grading comment
Thanks Deborah, I think this fits the colloquial aspect perfectly
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4useless wimp
Charles Davis
4fool /fools
Jenni Lukac (X)
3flop / plop
DLyons
3"reject"
Bubo Coroman (X)
3loser/idiot/dropout/...
Carol Gullidge
2pleb / plebeian
Sarita Mardon


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
pleb / plebeian


Explanation:
Not exactly the same meaning, but might this work in this context?


Sarita Mardon
Local time: 07:37
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
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16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
"reject"


Explanation:
a reject is a substandard item coming off a production line, could be humorous here to allude to people and animals

Bubo Coroman (X)
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 151
Grading comment
Thanks Deborah, I think this fits the colloquial aspect perfectly
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24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
fool /fools


Explanation:
I'm basing this on the character's attitude. It seems that he's not one to "suffer fools gladly" and sees fools everywhere. www.phrases.org.uk › Discussion Forum -
17 Jan 2000 – I was wondering if anyone knows the origin and meaning of the phrase "i don't suffer fools gladly". : : The phrase refers to putting up with or ... The repeat could be handled "Fools, fools I tell you" or "Fools, yes, I said/mean fools".

Jenni Lukac (X)
Local time: 07:37
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 156
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50 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
loser/idiot/dropout/...


Explanation:
any old loser/ignoramus/idiot/riffraff/ dregs of society/ dropout/ creep/cretin/moron... could be a reporter

depending on how politically correct or otherwise you wish the speaker to be (do you want to depict him as really horrible, or just a little ignorant?) and on which sense of "pepla" you think fits the character's mindset...

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Note added at 51 mins (2012-05-10 11:25:11 GMT)
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sorry, missed out "retard" - not very nice, I know, but might fit the bill!

Carol Gullidge
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:37
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 311
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
useless wimp


Explanation:
I don't know how you'll handle the "pepla"/"plepa" variant, which is the basis of B's apparently pedantic reply, but that's a problem whichever English word you choose.

The RAE says it's of uncertain origin, but in several places it is traced to the French "plaît pas". It seems to apply both to that which "plaît pas", something defective, not up to standard, and to someone who is always grumbling or whining, and is generally ineffectual: someone who is always saying "plaît pas". Anyway, my suggestion comes from the following:

"ser un plepla
Ser alguien extremadamente delicado, que continuamente se queja por todo. «Este niño es un plepa, en cuanto le tocan un pelo, ya está llorando». Se cuenta que durante la guerra de la Independencia (1808-1812) se instaló en Sevilla un intendente francés que se encargaba de comprar caballos para el ejército napoleónico y que tenía un alto nivel de exigencia. Los que criaban caballos acudían a él para vendérselos, pero, cuando se los enseñaban, rechazaba casi todos diciendo «plaît pas», o sea, «no me gusta». «Plaît pas» se pronuncia en nuestra lengua «plepa», palabra que salió del ámbito equino para designar al quejoso o al protestón en general."
Diccionario de dichos y refranes. 2000.
http://www.esacademic.com/dic.nsf/sp_sp_dichos_refranes/2030...

Here, in a study of the speech of Navalmoral (Extremadura), it has the same meaning, a whiner:

"Cataplasma, goyoría, ser un-a plepa= los tres designan a una persona débil y quejosa. 'Fue siempre un goyoría, siempre malucho, un plepa, vamos'"
María Angustias Nuevo. El habla de Navalmoral de la Mata
http://en.calameo.com/read/000690912c09497a82154

Here, on the other hand, it is more like a nonentity, a useless individual:
"Esta palabra se la oí a un amigo mío gaditano. Su uso se remonta a la época en que los franceses acamparon en la zona de Chiclana, para intentar entrar en Cádiz, durante la Guerra de la Independencia. Cuando tenían que comprar caballos para el ejército francés, la gente de alrededor le llevaban sus animales, examinándolos cuidadosamente y algunos los rechazaban diciendo "plaît pas", que en castellano significa "no me gusta". De ahí viene que, en Cádiz, utilicen la palabra para referirse a una persona que no gusta y no sirve para nada (“¡Ese es un plepa!”). (Mercedes Luna)."
http://82.223.149.104/spip/spip.php?article430

This is apparently how it's being used here too:
"Lo que está claro es que el señor Rajoy tiene el liderazgo prácticamente amortizado antes de materializarlo y su derrota es un factor "descontado", como dicen quienes juegan en la bolsa. Frente a los dos astros madrileños, el señor Rajoy es un plepa. Su partido renquea tres puntos porcentuales en intención de voto por detrás del PSOE y él es el político peor valorado a escala nacional."
http://cotarelo.blogspot.com.es/2007/06/ambicin-de-poder.htm...

So since it could have either of these connotations, a wimp or whiner or a useless nonentity, I've hedged my bets with "useless wimp".

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 07:37
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 296
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40 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
flop / plop


Explanation:
I was thinking along the lines of the Yiddish "sch" e.g. "loser / schmoozer" but maybe that's not international enough.

The rhyme carries something of the same dismissiveness as does the "plop" sound of them being discarded.

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Note added at 4 hrs (2012-05-10 15:04:47 GMT)
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Just to be clear, what I'm suggesting is:

pepla = flop

plepa = plop

i.e both words are used, to tie in with the structure of the original.

DLyons
Ireland
Local time: 06:37
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 35
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