Pavura

English translation: Terror-Fear-Dread

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:Pavura
English translation:Terror-Fear-Dread
Entered by: Cecilia Gowar

22:59 Mar 15, 2018
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Poetry & Literature
Spanish term or phrase: Pavura
From the Dominican Republic:

Había recordado el capítulo 91 que su abuela le leía al acostarse siendo niño, bajo la pavura de la oscuridad de la noche:
Caiman
United States
Local time: 17:16
Terror
Explanation:
pavura
1. f. Temor o pavor.(RAE)
Not many listening to Silvio Rodríguez around here...

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Note added at 10 hrs (2018-03-16 09:14:49 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

"Si no creyera en la locura
de la garganta del sinsonte
si no creyera que en el monte
se esconde el trino y la pavura."
Selected response from:

Cecilia Gowar
United Kingdom
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4Terror
Cecilia Gowar
5 +2Miedo
Sanda Lam
4 +3dread
neilmac
4 +1fright/creepy
Daniel Liberman
5Miedo y todos los buenísmos sinónimos aquí citados
Sanda Lam


  

Answers


20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Miedo


Explanation:
Es una palabra en idioma italiano.

Sanda Lam
Local time: 00:16
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Charles Davis: Es una palabra española; ya la utiliza Gonzalo de Berceo (s. XIII). Es temor con espanto o sobresalto (DLE). Se pide una traducción al inglés.
10 mins

agree  neilmac: = pavor.
8 hrs

agree  Jo Hance: From the noun "pavo" - turkey - to get goosebumps of fear perhaps?
9 hrs

neutral  JohnMcDove: @ Jo - No. Nothing to do with turkeys. http://www.latin-dictionary.net/definition/29559/pavor-pavor...
3 days 22 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
fright/creepy


Explanation:
See Web references.


    https://glosbe.com/es/en/pavura
    https://www.google.com/search?q=%22fright+of+darkness%22&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-b-1
Daniel Liberman
United States
Local time: 17:16
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  JohnMcDove: "Fright of the darkness of the night" may work.
3 hrs

neutral  neilmac: A fright is sudden; dread creeps....
6 hrs
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9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
dread


Explanation:
Not the eponymous judge, but the fear. I thought it looked like "pavor", so I ran a search and this is what came up.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 hrs (2018-03-16 08:20:15 GMT)
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IMH0, "fright" is too sudden, and more akin to "sobresealto".

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Note added at 9 hrs (2018-03-16 08:21:52 GMT)
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For example, a search for the collocation "creeping dread" gets 44,200 results...

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Note added at 9 hrs (2018-03-16 08:24:24 GMT)
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UGhGf40_6rw


    Reference: http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=pavo...
neilmac
Spain
Local time: 23:16
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 87

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Cecilia Gowar: Right, dread or terror. It is a well known word, and it is in the RAE and every dictionary I have, as well as online.
1 hr

agree  patinba
3 hrs

agree  Robert Carter: Perhaps an adjective would work better here "...dreaded darkness..." rather than "dread of the darkness of the night"?
2 days 23 hrs
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9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Miedo y todos los buenísmos sinónimos aquí citados


Explanation:
Para Charles, vos mismo lo estás corroborando, se habrá incorporado al idioma español, pero la palabra es de origen italiano, idioma que estudié en la secundaria, de modo de que no contradice lo q dije, gracias, Gonzalo la utiliza, no deja d tener raíz italiana.


Es una palabra española; ya la utiliza Gonzalo de Berceo

Sanda Lam
Local time: 00:16
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Charles Davis: Hola Sanda. En IT es paura, sin v intervocálica. ES pavura no viene del IT, sino que ambos (al igual que CAT paüra) vienen del LAT vulgar pavura, variante del LAT pavor por variación de sufijo. ¡Saludos cordiales!
2 days 11 hrs
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Terror


Explanation:
pavura
1. f. Temor o pavor.(RAE)
Not many listening to Silvio Rodríguez around here...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 hrs (2018-03-16 09:14:49 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

"Si no creyera en la locura
de la garganta del sinsonte
si no creyera que en el monte
se esconde el trino y la pavura."

Cecilia Gowar
United Kingdom
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 160
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  patinba
2 hrs
  -> ¡Gracias Pat!

agree  Charles Davis: You get my agree not only for a suitable translation but for quoting Silvio's "La Maza", which I have loved for over 30 years and immediately came to my mind when I saw this word.
2 days 10 hrs
  -> Thanks Charles! That is exactly what happened to me!

agree  Robert Carter: Not a trova fan myself, but quite apart from the lyrical prowess on show here, the music in this song is stunning, when that piano begins... How about changing it to an adjective here, "...the terrible/fearful darkness of the night"?
2 days 22 hrs
  -> Thanks Robert! I would say "while terrified of the dark (at night?)". I suppose "bedtime" makes this last bit redundant.

agree  Domini Lucas: another SR listener here. But not just for that. For the sound of the word ‘terror’ in the translation.
3 days 7 hrs
  -> Thanks Domini!
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