Inmueble por adherencia

English translation: appurtenance

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:Inmueble por adherencia
English translation:appurtenance
Entered by: Patricio Vidal

18:56 Dec 12, 2007
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Real Estate
Spanish term or phrase: Inmueble por adherencia
Se refiere a un inmueble que esta adherido a un inmueble principal. Por ejemplo un árbol es un inmueble por adherencia.

Gracias de antemano
Patricio Vidal
Chile
Local time: 02:34
appurtenance
Explanation:
another option..
Selected response from:

Marina Godano
Argentina
Local time: 02:34
Grading comment
Thanks for your help, I found that "appurtenance" was the word that suits best becuase I surfed the internet and this was the best option.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 -1fixture
Rebecca Jowers
4structural component
Erik Bry
4appurtenance
Marina Godano
3 +1appendage
AllegroTrans
3 -2adjoining building
swisstell


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -2
adjoining building


Explanation:
comes to mind

swisstell
Italy
Local time: 07:34
Works in field
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in category: 38

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  AllegroTrans: a tree is not an "adjoining building" (see asker's text)
31 mins

disagree  Kim Metzger: Asker wrote: "Por ejemplo un árbol es un inmueble por adherencia."
2 hrs
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32 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
appendage


Explanation:
The asker says a tree fits into this definition. A tree, claerly, is neither a fixture or an outbuilding. The only word I know of to describe "things" that go with buildings, in the widest generic sense, is appendages.
Thre just might be a better word.

AllegroTrans
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:34
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 82

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kim Metzger: Appendage is the best generic term. Trees are treated as appendages to property.
1 hr
  -> thanks KM
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52 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
appurtenance


Explanation:
another option..

Marina Godano
Argentina
Local time: 02:34
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks for your help, I found that "appurtenance" was the word that suits best becuase I surfed the internet and this was the best option.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
structural component


Explanation:
More context is needed. Land improvements could be an option...but that's for stuff like sidewalks, driveways, sewage, pools, etc...What is this for? Depreciation, valuation, ?? because you don't depreciate trees, however a tree would be considered landscaping, and you can depreciate landscaping. Natural resources are depleted.
Muebles por naturaleza: Por su propia naturaleza pueden desplazarse de un lugar a otro, con ayuda o sin ayuda.

Inmuebles por adherencia: Son ciertos bienes muebles por naturaleza que se reputan inmuebles por estar adheridos permanentemente a un inmueble.

Arboles y plantas son inmuebles por radicación o adhesión mientras adhieren al suelo por sus raices de no ser asi de no estar incorporados materal o físicamente al suelo sino que estan en macetas o cajones qyue puedan transportarse de un lugar a otro no seran inmubles por radicación o adhieren cono muebles por naturaleza por su obvio sentido de movilidad es decir por su posibilidad de trasladarse de un lugar a otro sin perder su esencia.

Erik Bry
Local time: 23:34
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
fixture


Explanation:
This is called "fixture" in English.

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Note added at 10 mins (2007-12-12 19:07:04 GMT)
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Here's the definition from the Merriam-Webster legal dictionary:

fixture--an item of movable property so incorporated into real property that it may be regarded legally as a part of it.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs (2007-12-13 00:07:00 GMT)
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To address AllegroTrans' observation:

The classification of types of property in common law and civil law systems are often not comparable. In many common law property law systems, trees are considered a part of land and, thus, could not be described as “inmuebles por adherencia”:

Real property consists of rights in land and anything attached to the land (e.g., buildings, signs, fences, or trees). Personal property consists of rights in things other than land.
www.personal.psu.edu/users/a/x/axa918/Law School/fall 2007/...

However, trees are indeed considered "fixtures" in the property law of some common law jurisdictions. Here are several definitions in which it is clear that "trees" are considered fixtures:

Real property--Land and any permanent fixtures on it, including buildings, trees, and other fixtures.
http://www.realestatelawyers.com/Glossary-Real-Estate-Terms....

Ownership of the land generally implies the soil surface, any natural fixtures on the land (trees, grass, rock formations), any man-made fixtures (houses, farm and ranch structures, etc.). Water on and in the land is owned by the State, which may give the land owner certain rights to use the water.
http://wwweng.uwyo.edu/classes/fa2007/ce2100/chapter2/chapte...

California statutory law specifically defines a fixture as something affixed to real property "by roots, as in the case of trees, vines, or shrubs;
www.usdoj.gov/osg/briefs/1995/w95128w.txt

People who have been exposed only to the more familiar forms of western property law often assume that trees are part and parcel of the land on which they grow. They are "fixtures," and like buildings are assumed to be owned by whoever owns the land.
http://www.fao.org/docrep/006/t7540e/T7540E01.htm

Thus, I think AllegroTrans’s comment that “a tree is not a fixture” is perhaps somewhat limited in scope. Trees may not be what first comes to mind when the word “fixture” is mentioned, but “fixture” may be the closest translation of “inmueble por adherencia”. And “appendage” is certainly more a descriptive, rather than a legal term in this context.



Rebecca Jowers
Spain
Local time: 07:34
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 107

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  AllegroTrans: A tree is not a "fixture" (see asker's text)///but we are not concerned with common law jurisdictions in any case - this is Chile. A tree is certainly NOT a fixture in England - it is an appendage to the grounds of a property
24 mins
  -> A tree is indeed a "fixture" in many common law jurisdictions. I will post a comment.
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