santo

English translation: name day

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:santo
English translation:name day
Entered by: Charles Davis

00:41 Dec 16, 2016
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Religion / catholisism
Spanish term or phrase: santo
"con motivo del santo de la Reina Maria Luisa, el monumento fue entregado"
claudis
name day
Explanation:
It means the date of the feast day of the saint with whom you share a name. For example, my birthday is in August but my name day is 4 November, St Charles's day.

It has been customary in Catholic countries to name children after a saint on whose feast day they are born or baptised, in which case your name day and your birthday are the same or at least close in date, but this is very far from being universal practice, either now or in historical periods. In the case of royal families there were often dynastic reasons for choosing children's names; it was not determined by the calendar of saints. Take Queen María Luisa of Parma, consort of Charles IV of Spain (I don't know whether this is the Queen María Luisa your text refers to). Her birthday was 9 December; she was born on 9 December 1751. But her "santo", her name day, was 15 March, St Louise's day.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Name_day
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Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 19:03
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +5name day
Charles Davis
5 -1Birthday
Juan Jacob


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Birthday


Explanation:
Se bautizaba a la gente según el santoral... por extensión, el día de tu santo es/era el día de tu cumpleaños.

Juan Jacob
Mexico
Local time: 12:03
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 1

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Charles Davis: Hay, y siempre ha habido, muchísimas excepciones, sobre todo en las familias reales donde los nombres se elegían por otros motivos.
6 hrs
  -> Es correcto. Si el evento tuvo lugar el 9 de diciembre, es su cumple.

disagree  AllegroTrans: No
8 hrs
  -> Could be.

neutral  Robert Carter: Can't be sure, as we need to know where this is from, but no way is it a definite "no".
18 hrs
  -> Estamos en duda. Gracias.
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +5
name day


Explanation:
It means the date of the feast day of the saint with whom you share a name. For example, my birthday is in August but my name day is 4 November, St Charles's day.

It has been customary in Catholic countries to name children after a saint on whose feast day they are born or baptised, in which case your name day and your birthday are the same or at least close in date, but this is very far from being universal practice, either now or in historical periods. In the case of royal families there were often dynastic reasons for choosing children's names; it was not determined by the calendar of saints. Take Queen María Luisa of Parma, consort of Charles IV of Spain (I don't know whether this is the Queen María Luisa your text refers to). Her birthday was 9 December; she was born on 9 December 1751. But her "santo", her name day, was 15 March, St Louise's day.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Name_day


Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 19:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 92
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Marie Wilson: No other way to say it. I actually always say Saint's Day because it's the easy option but I think Name Day is the correct term.
41 mins
  -> Well, "saint's day" is sometimes used, as AllegroTrans says, but "name day" is the usual expression, I think. Thanks, Marie :)

agree  franglish
1 hr
  -> Thanks, franglish :)

agree  AllegroTrans: also "Saint's day"
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Chris! You're right, that is sometimes used.

agree  lorenab23: Yes, although in LA we use santo and cumpleaños as synonyms, I know that in Spain that is not the case. Birthday and Saint's day are two very different things. Abrazos
10 hrs
  -> I didn't know that. Thanks, Lorena :-) // Just checked Dic. del español de México and santo there means "Celebración del día del nombre de una persona de acuerdo con el santoral o calendario cristiano", so it's not officially synonym of b'day in Mex.

agree  Robert Carter: Not officially a synonym here, but some older folk definitely use it that way, possibly because they may only have celebrated that day and not the "cumpleaños" when they were younger. Not sure, I'll have to check with someone.
11 hrs
  -> That's interesting. Mexico aside, it's true that there have been times and places in which the name day has been a bigger deal than the birthday. (And of course Liz II, la más reina de las reinas, has two birthdays.)
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