quiebra láctica

English translation: lactic souring / spoilage

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:quiebra láctica
English translation:lactic souring / spoilage
Entered by: Paul Roige (X)

01:07 Apr 26, 2005
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Wine / Oenology / Viticulture
Spanish term or phrase: quiebra láctica
Haven't been very lucky with this term, and I've been searching all day and dreaming about it all night. Maybe someone would share a clue. No need to explain what it is but basically it's what happens when tartaric and lactic acid strongholds are overun by acetic bacterial hordes.
Thank you kindly.
Paul :-)
Paul Roige (X)
Spain
Local time: 08:43
hydrolysis of lactose/lactolysis
Explanation:
Just some suggestions.

I'm not so sure about "lactolysis", which is my pseudo-scientific, literal translation of the two words "quiebra" and "láctica". Is it the breakdown of some lactose-related product or a breakdown of something else facilitated by a lactose-related product?

But I found "hydrolysis of lactose" in a glossary of winemaking terms, though that does not prove much.

Good luck.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 14 mins (2005-04-26 02:22:34 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Or might it be malolactic fermentation, which involves bacteria (http://members.tripod.com/~BRotter/MLF.htm)? What\'s the full sentence?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 16 mins (2005-04-26 02:24:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I think \"malolactic fermentation\" is just another name for \"secondary fermentation\", RebeW\'s suggestion.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 55 mins (2005-04-26 03:03:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

ACETOUS FERMENTATION

Acetous fermentation or Acetic fermentation, a form of
oxidation in which alcohol is converted into vinegar or
acetic acid by the agency of a specific fungus (Mycoderma
aceti}) or series of enzymes. The process involves two
distinct reactions, in which the oxygen of the air is
essential. An intermediate product, acetaldehyde, is
formed in the first process. 1. C2H6O + O [rarr] H2O +
C2H4O http://www.dictionarywords.net/find/word/Acetous fermentatio...

OED definition of vinegar:
1. a. A liquid (consisting of acetic acid in a dilute form) produced by the ***acetous fermentation*** of wine and some other alcoholic liquors or special compounds and employed either pure or with various admixtures in the preparation of food (or as a relish to this) and in the arts, etc.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 1 min (2005-04-26 03:09:41 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

MALOLACTIC FERMENTATION/CONVERSION

But the problem with \"acetous fermentation\" is that the \"láctica\" in the original disappears. I\'d like to take back what I said earlier; it might still be \"malolactic fermentation/conversion\", which is a form of \"secondary fermentation\" (a catch-all term). The following passage changed my mind:

Following the primary fermentation of wines, several secondary fermentations may be carried out, depending on the final product desired. During the production of many wines, two main acidic components are present: malic and tartaric acid. The final concentration of these organic acids determines the final acidity of the wine produced4. Quality wines may undergo a secondary fermentation, known as malolactic conversion, to decrease the acidity of a wine. In this process, a lactic acid bacterium known as Oenococcus oeni is introduced into the grape juice and catalyzes the conversion of malic acid to the less acidic-tasting lactic acid4. This conversion is important not only because it improves the palatability of a wine, but it can increase shelf-life as well. One problem with this process is that this secondary fermentation often fails to progress very quickly. This leads to increased spoilage products in the wine, and and in particular produces biogenic amines, the main culprit behind wine-induced headache. (http://bioteach.ubc.ca/Bioengineering/beerandwine/)
Selected response from:

Kelvin Wu
Local time: 02:43
Grading comment
No news from client, good news then. Lactic souring plus short description in brackets dressed it nicely. As the brainstorming session with Kelvin helped me to get there, four it is then for him. Thanks a bunch. Paul :-)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3lactic souring
moken
3lactic clouding
bigedsenior
3hydrolysis of lactose/lactolysis
Kelvin Wu
3secondary fermentation
RebeW
2lactic breakdown
Coral Getino


Discussion entries: 10





  

Answers


48 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
quiebra láctica
secondary fermentation


Explanation:
Hi Paul,
These links might help out a bit further! I checked them out, and it seems to refer to the same process you have described.
Good Luck!
Rebecca

This Wine Learning Center article covers Secondary Fermentation. ... fermentation)
where the malic acid is altered by natural means into lactic acid; ...
www.winedefinitions.com/learningcenter/ articles/secondaryfermentation.htm

Secondary fermentation in wine occurs when yeast's fermentation of sugar ...
lactic acid, Oenococcus oeni plays a critical role in de-acidifying wine ...
www.arches.uga.edu/~sashford/Microbes.html

base white wine that will be made to undergo a secondary fermentation in ...
malo-lactic fermentation occurs when a strain of lactic acid bacteria is ...
www.iwantmybeer.com/en-us/dept_112.html

malo-lactic fermentation occurs when a strain of lactic acid bacteria is ...
“secondary fermentation” when the yeast are slowing down and the wine needs ...
winemakermag.com/departments/59.html


RebeW
Local time: 02:43
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
quiebra láctica
lactic breakdown


Explanation:
Winepros - Article
... usually because the oak usage is minimal and the typically low acidity steers winemakers away from employing malo-lactic breakdown to soften the wine. ...
winepros.com.au/jsp/cda/ authors/article_print.jsp?ID=4088 - 6k - Supplemental Result - Cached - Similar pages


Coral Getino
United States
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
quiebra láctica
hydrolysis of lactose/lactolysis


Explanation:
Just some suggestions.

I'm not so sure about "lactolysis", which is my pseudo-scientific, literal translation of the two words "quiebra" and "láctica". Is it the breakdown of some lactose-related product or a breakdown of something else facilitated by a lactose-related product?

But I found "hydrolysis of lactose" in a glossary of winemaking terms, though that does not prove much.

Good luck.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 14 mins (2005-04-26 02:22:34 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Or might it be malolactic fermentation, which involves bacteria (http://members.tripod.com/~BRotter/MLF.htm)? What\'s the full sentence?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 16 mins (2005-04-26 02:24:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I think \"malolactic fermentation\" is just another name for \"secondary fermentation\", RebeW\'s suggestion.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 55 mins (2005-04-26 03:03:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

ACETOUS FERMENTATION

Acetous fermentation or Acetic fermentation, a form of
oxidation in which alcohol is converted into vinegar or
acetic acid by the agency of a specific fungus (Mycoderma
aceti}) or series of enzymes. The process involves two
distinct reactions, in which the oxygen of the air is
essential. An intermediate product, acetaldehyde, is
formed in the first process. 1. C2H6O + O [rarr] H2O +
C2H4O http://www.dictionarywords.net/find/word/Acetous fermentatio...

OED definition of vinegar:
1. a. A liquid (consisting of acetic acid in a dilute form) produced by the ***acetous fermentation*** of wine and some other alcoholic liquors or special compounds and employed either pure or with various admixtures in the preparation of food (or as a relish to this) and in the arts, etc.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 1 min (2005-04-26 03:09:41 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

MALOLACTIC FERMENTATION/CONVERSION

But the problem with \"acetous fermentation\" is that the \"láctica\" in the original disappears. I\'d like to take back what I said earlier; it might still be \"malolactic fermentation/conversion\", which is a form of \"secondary fermentation\" (a catch-all term). The following passage changed my mind:

Following the primary fermentation of wines, several secondary fermentations may be carried out, depending on the final product desired. During the production of many wines, two main acidic components are present: malic and tartaric acid. The final concentration of these organic acids determines the final acidity of the wine produced4. Quality wines may undergo a secondary fermentation, known as malolactic conversion, to decrease the acidity of a wine. In this process, a lactic acid bacterium known as Oenococcus oeni is introduced into the grape juice and catalyzes the conversion of malic acid to the less acidic-tasting lactic acid4. This conversion is important not only because it improves the palatability of a wine, but it can increase shelf-life as well. One problem with this process is that this secondary fermentation often fails to progress very quickly. This leads to increased spoilage products in the wine, and and in particular produces biogenic amines, the main culprit behind wine-induced headache. (http://bioteach.ubc.ca/Bioengineering/beerandwine/)


    Reference: http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/glossary.asp
Kelvin Wu
Local time: 02:43
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in ChineseChinese
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
No news from client, good news then. Lactic souring plus short description in brackets dressed it nicely. As the brainstorming session with Kelvin helped me to get there, four it is then for him. Thanks a bunch. Paul :-)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
quiebra láctica
lactic clouding


Explanation:
QUEBRADO. Vino enfermo por alguna de las llamadas quiebras que producen graves enturbiamientos.

QUIEBRA. Enturbiamiento grave de origen químico. Quiebra férrica: originada por insolubilización de sales de hierro presentes en el vino por reacción con otros componentes (ácido fosfórico, tanino). Otras quiebras son la quiebra proteica y la quiebra cúprica
http://www.geocities.com/cadete.geo/vinosdic.html#q

bigedsenior
Local time: 23:43
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 28
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
quiebra láctica
lactic souring


Explanation:
Hi Paul - long time...

Well, see what you think of this one. 28 hits aren't much to shout about, but some are quite interesting. See this excerpt (link below):

Lactic Souring

Spontaneous malolactic fermentation is a common red winemaking phenomena. However, several different kinds of ML bacteria exist, and different types of bacteria produce different byproducts in wine. Unfortunately, many byproducts produced by malolactic bacteria (other than the ML fermentation) are detrimental to wine quality.

The French enologist, Emile Peynaud, gives several rules for making red wine in his excellent book "Knowing and Making Wine." His cardinal rule is ". . . make sure the sugars are fermented by yeast, and the malic acid is fermented by bacteria." This is sage advice because most types of lactic bacteria can and will ferment sugar. When lactic bacteria attack grape sugars, the glucose is converted into lactic acid and acetic acid, and the fructose can be converted into a nasty material called mannitol. When lactic bacteria ferment sugar, the volatile acidity of the infected wine can increase rapidly, and the wine often takes on a characteristic sweet-sour taste. This type of bacterial spoilage occurs most often when wines have an excessively high pH.

Lactic souring and vinegar formation are quite different. Lactic bacteria produce acetic acid by fermenting the sugar. Unlike acetobacter, lactic bacteria produce little ethyl acetate and large amounts of air are not required. Sometimes this type of spoilage is difficult to diagnose because the wine often has a good bouquet and the flavor may be good. However, a hot, burning characteristic is always present in the aftertaste. A lingering hotness in a wine always suggests excessive acetic acid, and sweet-sour tastes sometimes occur when considerable sugar remains in the wine. Lactic bacteria are probably the culprits rather than acetobacter when wine contains excessive acetic acid and little ethyl acetate.

Controlling bacteria early in the fermentation is important because some types of lactic bacteria prefer sugar to malic acid. Most experts recommend treating grapes with 30 milligrams per liter of SO2 at the crusher, even if ML fermentation will be encouraged later in the winemaking process. Even at this low level, the sulfur dioxide is effective in limiting early bacterial growth. After a few days of fermentation, the sulfur dioxide level in the wine will be very low, and it will no longer inhibit the desired ML fermentation.

http://home.att.net/~lumeisenman/chapt13.html

I reckon if it's good enough for someone with that background on wine processes, it's good enough for a translation.

In any case, check out google and see what you think of the other references to lactic souring.

Good luck!!!!

Álvaro :O) :O)

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Note added at 8 hrs 38 mins (2005-04-26 09:46:01 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Oh sh**! I hadn\'t seen you had hit on that already...silly me!

Ok, well this author speaks of \"detrimental fermentation\".
I also see plenty of refs to \"spontaneous fermentation\", a few to \"spontaneous wine fermentation\", but what\'s most interesting of all, there are none whatsoever to \"quiebra láctea\" so your idea that the guy has coined the term himself looks likely. This would mean your hands are free to do the same, add a translator\'s note, whatever.

The final term really depends on whether you are looking to cover various forms of spontaneous unwanted fermentation or just the type that responds to \"lactic souring\". Check my ref out from where it says \"Other fermentations\" (if you really are lucky enough to have all that time to spare). You might find other descriptions that help you with other bits of the translation.

Take care! :O ):O)

moken
Local time: 07:43
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in category: 7
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