KudoZ home » Spanish to Basque » Other

Oso

Basque translation: hartz

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:oso
Basque translation:hartz
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

18:39 Oct 8, 2001
Spanish to Basque translations [Non-PRO]
Spanish term or phrase: Oso
El nombre del animal
Jesús Paredes
Local time: 20:29
hartz
Explanation:
Me parece que es hartz. Mira esta referencia, me parece muy interesante. Es en inglés.

¡Suerte!

There are some cases where Basque and Celtic words seem to belong together, but where sound laws appear to forbid a direct connection. The Basque word hartz „bear“ resembles Irish art „bear“ and Welsh arth „bear“ (Proto-Celtic probably *arkto-s). The Celtic words are of Indo-European origin and cognate with Classical Greek arktos, Latin ursus, and Sanskrit rksa- „bear“. We would expect *arto or *arta in Basque, if the Celtic word were represented here. There is no transition -t- > -tz- in Basque. If Basque hartz is not a Celtic loanword, should we then assume (Pre-Roman, Pre-Latin) Pre-Celtic Basque-Indo-European contact?

http://free.freespeech.org/ehj/html/mowstr.html
Selected response from:

Sheila Hardie
Spain
Local time: 01:29
Grading comment
Gracias a SJH y a Linguavox por su ayuda. En realidad, ya conocía el término y quería confirmación. Saludos
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5"Hartz"
LinguaVox
4 +1hartz
Sheila Hardie


  

Answers


5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
hartz


Explanation:
Me parece que es hartz. Mira esta referencia, me parece muy interesante. Es en inglés.

¡Suerte!

There are some cases where Basque and Celtic words seem to belong together, but where sound laws appear to forbid a direct connection. The Basque word hartz „bear“ resembles Irish art „bear“ and Welsh arth „bear“ (Proto-Celtic probably *arkto-s). The Celtic words are of Indo-European origin and cognate with Classical Greek arktos, Latin ursus, and Sanskrit rksa- „bear“. We would expect *arto or *arta in Basque, if the Celtic word were represented here. There is no transition -t- > -tz- in Basque. If Basque hartz is not a Celtic loanword, should we then assume (Pre-Roman, Pre-Latin) Pre-Celtic Basque-Indo-European contact?

http://free.freespeech.org/ehj/html/mowstr.html

Sheila Hardie
Spain
Local time: 01:29
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Grading comment
Gracias a SJH y a Linguavox por su ayuda. En realidad, ya conocía el término y quería confirmación. Saludos

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Fernando Muela: Sí, es "hartz", te lo puedo confirmar.
3 hrs
  -> Gracias:)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
"Hartz"


Explanation:
Sí, se dice "hartz" (y si le añades el artículo determinado, "hartza" (el oso). Hay muchas canciones populares con esta palabra (te lo digo por experiencia, conozco muchas de mi infancia).
Un ejemplo,
"Hemen dago hartza, Iurretako plazan, dantza dantza dantza, pum pum pum"

LinguaVox
Spain
Local time: 01:29
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in FrenchFrench
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search