división entera

English translation: integer division

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:división entera
English translation:integer division
Entered by: Charles Davis
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08:40 May 26, 2018
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Accounting / EDI software / programming
Spanish term or phrase: división entera
SPAIN. I was never much of a mathematician. Even the distinction between real numbers, whole numbers and integers is hard for me to grasp. Which is why I need someone better at it to confirm the correct way to translate this in the context.

"La división entera es mucho más rápida que la usual. En general cualquier cuenta que utilice sólo enteros es más rápida que una que use números reales (punto flotante)."

Abajo aparece como utilizar esto en los diferentes lenguajes y el resultado esperado.

Quick Basic
Pascal
C/C++"
neilmac
Spain
Local time: 22:08
integer division
Explanation:
I'm sure you're more of a mathematician than me, but here goes.

First, números enteros are definitely integers: negative or positive "whole" numbers or zero (...-3, --2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3...).
Números reales are all rational or irrational numbers, so they include integers, fractions, decimals, as well as things like π (pi).

So you would think that "división entera" must be "integer division", and I think that in your context it certainly is, but this is not so straightforward, because "división entera" is used in another sense too. In school maths in Spanish you find a distinction between "división exacta" and "división entera", where the first leaves no remainder and the latter does leave a remainder:

"Una división es exacta, cuando al repartir no nos sobra nada, es decir, cuando el resto es 0.
Una división es entera cuando al repartir, nos sobra algo, es decir, cuando el resto es distinto de cero."
http://sanjosedecalasanz5b.blogspot.com.es/2012/12/division-...

This is not the same as integer division, which basically means that you ignore the remainder:

"Integer division is division in which the fractional part (remainder) is discarded"
http://mathworld.wolfram.com/IntegerDivision.html

However, in your case "división entera" does mean integer division. Let me quote the examples for Quick Basic from your own source (whose URL I won't quote, just in case):

"División entera
Print 3\5 ' Resultado= 0
Print 137\5 ' Resultado= 27
Print 30\5 ' Resultado= 6"

Obviously the third is an exact division, but in the first two they've discarded the remainder. So these are integer divisions.

By the way, note the use of the backslash in the examples: this shows it's integer division:

"[Integer division] is sometimes denoted \.
10/3=3+1/3,
so
10\3=3."
http://mathworld.wolfram.com/IntegerDivision.html

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2018-05-26 11:00:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Forgot to add, as a footnote, that "división exacta" in the sense the school blog is using it ("cuando el resto es distinto de cero") is either called division with a remainder or (I think) Euclidean division:

"In arithmetic, Euclidean division is the process of division of two integers, which produces a quotient and a remainder smaller than the divisor. Its main property is that the quotient and remainder exist and are unique, under some conditions."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euclidean_division

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2018-05-26 12:20:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In my note at the end I meant to say that "división entera", in the sense the school blog is using it, is division with a remainder, not "división exacta" (which has no remainder). Sorry for the confusion; it's bad enough without adding typos as well.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2018-05-26 12:30:32 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Ah! OK, but as far as can see "división entera" does mean integer division in computer science.
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 22:08
Grading comment
And the winner is... :)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +3integer division
Charles Davis


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
integer division


Explanation:
I'm sure you're more of a mathematician than me, but here goes.

First, números enteros are definitely integers: negative or positive "whole" numbers or zero (...-3, --2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3...).
Números reales are all rational or irrational numbers, so they include integers, fractions, decimals, as well as things like π (pi).

So you would think that "división entera" must be "integer division", and I think that in your context it certainly is, but this is not so straightforward, because "división entera" is used in another sense too. In school maths in Spanish you find a distinction between "división exacta" and "división entera", where the first leaves no remainder and the latter does leave a remainder:

"Una división es exacta, cuando al repartir no nos sobra nada, es decir, cuando el resto es 0.
Una división es entera cuando al repartir, nos sobra algo, es decir, cuando el resto es distinto de cero."
http://sanjosedecalasanz5b.blogspot.com.es/2012/12/division-...

This is not the same as integer division, which basically means that you ignore the remainder:

"Integer division is division in which the fractional part (remainder) is discarded"
http://mathworld.wolfram.com/IntegerDivision.html

However, in your case "división entera" does mean integer division. Let me quote the examples for Quick Basic from your own source (whose URL I won't quote, just in case):

"División entera
Print 3\5 ' Resultado= 0
Print 137\5 ' Resultado= 27
Print 30\5 ' Resultado= 6"

Obviously the third is an exact division, but in the first two they've discarded the remainder. So these are integer divisions.

By the way, note the use of the backslash in the examples: this shows it's integer division:

"[Integer division] is sometimes denoted \.
10/3=3+1/3,
so
10\3=3."
http://mathworld.wolfram.com/IntegerDivision.html

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2018-05-26 11:00:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Forgot to add, as a footnote, that "división exacta" in the sense the school blog is using it ("cuando el resto es distinto de cero") is either called division with a remainder or (I think) Euclidean division:

"In arithmetic, Euclidean division is the process of division of two integers, which produces a quotient and a remainder smaller than the divisor. Its main property is that the quotient and remainder exist and are unique, under some conditions."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euclidean_division

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2018-05-26 12:20:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In my note at the end I meant to say that "división entera", in the sense the school blog is using it, is division with a remainder, not "división exacta" (which has no remainder). Sorry for the confusion; it's bad enough without adding typos as well.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2018-05-26 12:30:32 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Ah! OK, but as far as can see "división entera" does mean integer division in computer science.

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 22:08
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 99
Grading comment
And the winner is... :)
Notes to answerer
Asker: Cheers Charles. That's very enlightening. The text sample I posted isn't actually my source text, just a usage example I pulled off the net to avoid exposing my client's coding SW.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  MPGS: :-) To put it simpler. 'exacta' (reminder 0 and discarded) is a subset of 'entera' (reminder discarded) || :))
1 hr
  -> Yes, that would reconcile the discrepancy. Many thanks, MPGS :-)

agree  Chema Nieto Castañón: Aunque en matemáticas división entera alude a otra idea (como señalas) en informática parece habitual con el sentido de integer division. Pej http://pyspanishdoc.sourceforge.net/tut/node18.html
1 hr
  -> Gracias, Chema :-) Eso es precisamente lo que me despistó. // Por cierto, tu referencia es excelente.

agree  Francois Boye: You don't need so many words to prove it!
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, François. The many words were mainly because the Spanish term has more than one meaning.
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