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piña

English translation: pine cone ?

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16:14 Aug 28, 2001
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Architecture
Spanish term or phrase: piña
castles
Maria Casal
Local time: 10:34
English translation:pine cone ?
Explanation:
I agree, more context is definitely needed, but is it possible it could really refer to pine cones? Pine cones are often used in heraldry (crests, coats of arms) and as a decorative motif.

Apart from flowers, fruit are also relatively common in heraldry. Apples, oranges, pears, grapes etc all appear in heraldry. But don't be confused if you see the word pineapple in heraldry - this really is referring to a pine-cone, not the pineapple that we think of today, which is obviously a tropical fruit. (http://www.sca.org.au/lochac/scribes/hrld_10.html)


El MONASTERIO DE SANTO DOMINGO fue fundado por el rey Enrique III de Castilla y por su esposa Catalina de Lancaster en la transición de los siglos XIV al XV. Los capiteles románicos del claustro contienen una sorprendente iconografía ilustrativa de la vida rural de la época: labradores de azada y arado romano, leñadores, pero también cabezas de cuyas bocas surgen sarmientos hojas, piñas, o leones y centauros... (http://personal.redestb.es/cauca/alreded.htm)

. Los más abundantes son lo capiteles con motivos vegetales: capiteles con bolas o piñas que surgen de grandes hojas más o menos estilizadas completadas por volutas en la parte superior; capiteles con tallos sinuosos que cobijan hojas, y capiteles con hojas de acanto (http://www.fromista.com/paginas/3_arte.htm)

CREST: Out of a Coronet composed of eight Pine Cones set upon a Rim Or a Mount Vert thereon a Griffin passant Gold the beak and forelegs Azure and ducally gorged of the last holding in the dexter claw a Hammer erect proper (http://www.civicheraldry.co.uk/surrey_ob.html)

Just a thought.
Selected response from:

xxxtazdog
Spain
Local time: 10:34
Grading comment
I'm sorry about not having more context,as it's captions for photos that I have no access to (life would be so much easier if I had them! But this job is like that sometimes)... Anyway, I think you may have hit the nail on the head, as the word comes up in connection with 'bola' and 'cúpula' in the main gateway of the fort. Thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +1reference
Patricia Lutteral
nacluster
Pere Ferrés Gurt
napine cone ?xxxtazdog
nachamber (of a revolver)xxxtrans4u
naan agglomeration
Parrot
nacrash/close ranks
Katherine Matles


  

Answers


4 mins
crash/close ranks


Explanation:
piña
: (fuerte) crash: dieron una piña contra un muro, they crashed into a wall.
l hacer piña / formar piña, to close ranks, pull together.

Without more context this is what I came up with


    vox
Katherine Matles
Spain
Local time: 10:34
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thanks,but it's not in the field of castles
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The asker has declined this answer
Comment: Thanks,but it's not in the field of castles

12 mins
an agglomeration


Explanation:
without more context, this is all I can think of. An agglomeration of towers, buildings...

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 10:34
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 97
Grading comment
It doesn't really fit castle description
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The asker has declined this answer
Comment: It doesn't really fit castle description

16 mins
chamber (of a revolver)


Explanation:
piña-(carib. Méx.) Hub. Punch (golpe), (Méx.) Chamber (revolver).

Hope this helps.

Bye

xxxtrans4u
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
It doesn't fit castle description
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)
The asker has declined this answer
Comment: It doesn't fit castle description

1 hr peer agreement (net): +1
reference


Explanation:
These "piñas" are something like crenels? What exactly are they, where are they located? Have mercy on us, give a little context :-))

The following site has many links to medieval architecture; hope it helps:

http://members.nbci.com/Kinley/medieval_history.htm

Regards,

Patricia


    Reference: http://members.nbci.com/Kinley/medieval_history.htm
Patricia Lutteral
Argentina
Local time: 06:34
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Andrea Bullrich: Patricia, menos mal que te veo, después de lo del cebador de ayer era capaz de largarme con "ananá" :-)))
1 hr
  -> no se flagele tanto, m´hija, parece argentina con tanta culpa... :-))
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6 hrs
cluster


Explanation:
Hola Maria,

Si te refieres a las piñas de los castillos de personas que se realizan en Cataluña, quizás una buena traducción sería "Cluster"

Hasta pronto, y suerte.

Pere

Pere Ferrés Gurt
Spain
Local time: 10:34
Native speaker of: Native in CatalanCatalan
Grading comment
creo que se refiere mas a la estructura de una fortaleza
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The asker has declined this answer
Comment: creo que se refiere mas a la estructura de una fortaleza

10 hrs
pine cone ?


Explanation:
I agree, more context is definitely needed, but is it possible it could really refer to pine cones? Pine cones are often used in heraldry (crests, coats of arms) and as a decorative motif.

Apart from flowers, fruit are also relatively common in heraldry. Apples, oranges, pears, grapes etc all appear in heraldry. But don't be confused if you see the word pineapple in heraldry - this really is referring to a pine-cone, not the pineapple that we think of today, which is obviously a tropical fruit. (http://www.sca.org.au/lochac/scribes/hrld_10.html)


El MONASTERIO DE SANTO DOMINGO fue fundado por el rey Enrique III de Castilla y por su esposa Catalina de Lancaster en la transición de los siglos XIV al XV. Los capiteles románicos del claustro contienen una sorprendente iconografía ilustrativa de la vida rural de la época: labradores de azada y arado romano, leñadores, pero también cabezas de cuyas bocas surgen sarmientos hojas, piñas, o leones y centauros... (http://personal.redestb.es/cauca/alreded.htm)

. Los más abundantes son lo capiteles con motivos vegetales: capiteles con bolas o piñas que surgen de grandes hojas más o menos estilizadas completadas por volutas en la parte superior; capiteles con tallos sinuosos que cobijan hojas, y capiteles con hojas de acanto (http://www.fromista.com/paginas/3_arte.htm)

CREST: Out of a Coronet composed of eight Pine Cones set upon a Rim Or a Mount Vert thereon a Griffin passant Gold the beak and forelegs Azure and ducally gorged of the last holding in the dexter claw a Hammer erect proper (http://www.civicheraldry.co.uk/surrey_ob.html)

Just a thought.


    as noted
xxxtazdog
Spain
Local time: 10:34
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 427
Grading comment
I'm sorry about not having more context,as it's captions for photos that I have no access to (life would be so much easier if I had them! But this job is like that sometimes)... Anyway, I think you may have hit the nail on the head, as the word comes up in connection with 'bola' and 'cúpula' in the main gateway of the fort. Thanks!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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