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de pueblerino en pueblerino

English translation: from yokel to yokel

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21:58 Jan 12, 2002
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
Spanish term or phrase: de pueblerino en pueblerino
literature
wildbill92
English translation:from yokel to yokel
Explanation:
just another option :Ñ)
Selected response from:

AndrewBM
Ireland
Local time: 01:35
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5from yokel to yokel
AndrewBM
4 +4from hick to hick
Hazel Whiteley
4 +3from townsman to townsman / from villager to villager
Rossana Triaca
5From village to village/ From town to townAngelaMR
4Bill, in case the connotation of the word is not negative in your context
Maria
4from one country bumkin to the next.Rodri
4from one country yokel to the nextJulia Bogdan Rollo
4From town to town
Rick Henry


  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
From village to village/ From town to town


Explanation:
That would be my suggestion. Hope it helps! :-)

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Note added at 2002-01-12 22:18:10 (GMT)
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In case Hazel is correct, I\'d like to add that maybe \"from hick to hick\" could be correct if \"pueblerino\" is supposed to be negative. :-)

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Note added at 2002-01-12 22:29:43 (GMT)
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Also, from hillbilly to hillbilly. That\'s colorful! :-)

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Note added at 2002-01-12 23:38:49 (GMT)
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One last note... if the text is referring to towns and not people, and if it\'s supposed to sound offensive, you could say \"from one hick town to the next.\"


    Reference: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=%22de+pueblo+en+pueblo%...
    Reference: http://www.diccionarios.com/cgi-bin/esp-engl.php?query=puebl...
AngelaMR
PRO pts in pair: 24
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
From town to town


Explanation:
HTH

Rick

Rick Henry
United States
Local time: 19:35
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 375
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
from hick to hick


Explanation:
Hick is an American term for "pueblerino".

Hick : a country dweller, a provincial.

In England you could say "bumpkin": a rustic or socially inept person.


    Oxford Spanish Dictionary
    OED
Hazel Whiteley
Local time: 01:35
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 548

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  AngelaMR: Hi, Hazel... Hick sounds quite derogatory... If the text is referring to a person and not the village itself, I would think it best to say "from villager to villager" (US). At least in the Midwest, hick isn't much better than redneck. :-)
7 mins
  -> Hi Angelote. I thought of saying "villager" but I felt that it didn't have the implications of provincial ignorance that "pueblerino" has. However, you may well be right that I have overdone the derogatory implication with the word "hick" (not used in UK)

agree  Patricia Myers: I agree with Hazel pueblerino in Spain has a negative connotation
22 mins

agree  AndrewBM
34 mins

agree  Gabriela Tenenbaum: to me, "pueblerino" is a bit pejorative so, "hick" or "yokel" could fit. #:)
4 hrs

agree  xxxmgonzalez
15 hrs
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24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
from townsman to townsman / from villager to villager


Explanation:
"Pueblerino" in this case seems to be the inhabitant of a village or town. I'd choose any of the above!

Good luck,
Rossana

Rossana Triaca
Uruguay
Local time: 22:35
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 115

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  kairosz (Mary Guerrero)
39 mins

agree  AndrewBM
43 mins

agree  Marisa Pavan
3 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
from yokel to yokel


Explanation:
just another option :Ñ)

AndrewBM
Ireland
Local time: 01:35
PRO pts in pair: 49
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Monica Colangelo: By far the very best option
5 mins
  -> Gracias

agree  AngelaMR: OK, how could anyone not like the sound of "yokel"? :-)
34 mins
  -> Gracias

agree  Yolanda Broad
1 hr
  -> Gracias

agree  Marcus Malabad: yes, but not in US English...
3 hrs
  -> Thanks. By the by, the yokels of Tennessee were cited as fit ancestors to the yokels of Kansas http://www.juryproject.org/monkey1.html

agree  Gabriela Tenenbaum: to me, "pueblerino" is a bit pejorative so, "hick" or "yokel" could fit. #:)
4 hrs
  -> Gracias Gabi :Ñ)
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
from one country yokel to the next


Explanation:
or you could say from one country hick to the next but as mentioned above that is fairly pejorative in the US.

Julia Bogdan Rollo
United States
Local time: 17:35
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 16
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12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
from one country bumkin to the next.


Explanation:
I agree with "yokel", "hick", "villager"... "bumkin" is just another option... to choose one, I'd need to have the surrounding register and humor

Rodri

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  MJ Barber: yeah, but bumpkin
41 mins
  -> of course, you're right.... careless
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23 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Bill, in case the connotation of the word is not negative in your context


Explanation:
you can use: "from one town inhabitant to another" or "from one village dweller to another"

This was an interesting question!

Happy translating ;o) Maria



Maria
Local time: 19:35
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 920
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