KudoZ home » Spanish to English » Art/Literary

tradición polifónica

English translation: polyphonic tradition

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:tradición polifónica
English translation:polyphonic tradition
Entered by: xxxLia Fail
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

00:57 Jan 27, 2002
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary / Tourism Alicante
Spanish term or phrase: tradición polifónica
Muy cerca encontraremos la laguna de La Mata, de agua salada, y Torrevieja, otro destacado centro turístico también definido por sus importantes salinas y su ***tradición polifónica***.

How could this be 'explained' iun layman's terms? Is it choral singing? Polyphony just won't do, it's not a word withinn the range of the average English reader.


Thanks in advance.
xxxLia Fail
Spain
Local time: 14:11
polyphonic tradition
Explanation:
Polyphony and polyphonic are perfectly good words. I sang in a polyphonic choir.
No need to explain. Word will be no more unintelligible to a potential English reader than it was to Spanish readers. Polyphony refers to several independent voices (counterpart). Baroque is a period; fugue is a specific type of counterpart (same melody a fifth up or a fourth down, beginning at differing times and going against itself).
Best wishes.
Selected response from:

Phillip Berryman
Local time: 08:11
Grading comment
I still had to expand the word in soem way, as it was important for the reader to understand........
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5 +8polyphonic traditionPhillip Berryman
4 +1choral singing traditionxxxPaul Roige
5polyphonic traditionbilbo
4Baroque counterpoint tradition?
Parrot


  

Answers


33 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
choral singing tradition


Explanation:
Ae, you're right. They play habaneras down there too. Shorter Oxford: Poliphony - "simultaneous combination of a number of parts, each forming an individual melody, and harmonizing with each other." Parramón: Música en que se combinan varias voces simultáneas e independientes. That's choral singing for the layman, so no need of counterpoint or polyphony.
Here goes one instance from ref 1:
"SEPTEMBER The Instituto Municipal de Cultura "Joaquín Chapaprieta" organizes this month the Música en los Barrios. The three most representative choral groups in town take their songs to different spots of TORREVIEJA, where they give the best example of the quality of local choral singing."
Good luck with it :-)


    Reference: http://www.torreguia.es/visitar/22uk.htm
xxxPaul Roige
Spain
Local time: 14:11
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in CatalanCatalan
PRO pts in pair: 442

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  barbarabt: Very good solution!
38 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

59 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Baroque counterpoint tradition?


Explanation:
As Paul points out, counterpoint is another term for polyphony (and since it's Baroque music you could also say "fugue"). The problem I see with choral is that it's so generic it could as well apply to Gregorian chants or monomelodic lines with simple harmony.

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 14:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 7645
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +8
polyphonic tradition


Explanation:
Polyphony and polyphonic are perfectly good words. I sang in a polyphonic choir.
No need to explain. Word will be no more unintelligible to a potential English reader than it was to Spanish readers. Polyphony refers to several independent voices (counterpart). Baroque is a period; fugue is a specific type of counterpart (same melody a fifth up or a fourth down, beginning at differing times and going against itself).
Best wishes.


Phillip Berryman
Local time: 08:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 147
Grading comment
I still had to expand the word in soem way, as it was important for the reader to understand........

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  two2tango: my polyphonic support!!
9 mins

agree  Nikki Graham: as well as 103 hits in Google
4 hrs

agree  Patricia Lutteral: yep, "choral" is too generic. I'd go for the specific term :-))
7 hrs

agree  xxxPaul Roige: polyphonic is indeed the perfect term :-)
7 hrs

agree  Fiona N�voa
8 hrs

agree  Dan Newland
9 hrs

agree  Regina Motta
13 hrs

agree  bilbo
1 day 17 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day 20 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
polyphonic tradition


Explanation:
polyphonic has a greek origine, comes from poly, which means a lot by itself but in the biginig of a word mean: a variety and the word phonic (phoni...) which means voice so something polyphonic means something with "a grate variety of voices"
a tradition composed by a variety of "voices".

bilbo
Spain
Local time: 14:11
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search