KudoZ home » Spanish to English » Art/Literary

Curiambro (juego de palabras)

English translation: coriander

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
14:05 Jan 29, 2002
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary / Children's literature, play on words
Spanish term or phrase: Curiambro (juego de palabras)
In a children's story, the dragon's name is Curiambro. The king does not hear it correctly, and thinks the dragon is called "Con Hambre". I am stuck for an equivalent play on the sounds of the words for the English version. It doesn't have to be too literal, as long as it has something to do with food. Perhaps something can be done with "snack"?
GoodWords
Mexico
Local time: 00:25
English translation:coriander
Explanation:
How about the name of an herb?

coriander-cilantro.

Here´s another one: "curry and broth"

Well, so much for inspiration.

Best of luck!
Bye
Selected response from:

xxxtrans4u
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone; please visit the question page to see my additional comments. We went with the name "Curiambre", with the king mis-hearing it as "Coriander". Besides this choice, I particularly liked "Egertweet", "Mungree" and "Curry and broth", among others. I wish it were possible to use more than one of the many clever and creative suggestions! By coincidence, I happen to be reading LOTR just now. At the moment when I was racking my brains over the names in this story, the orcs had just carried off Merry and Pippin. I'm also reading Tolkien's collected correspondence. A linguistics professor, he had some strong ideas on the translation of his work. He felt that the original English names should be retained; that translators should not try to invent equivalents in the target language.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5I agree, it is better keft the original names!pedrores
5Guttoongreepedrores
5Hungrydragon
Camara
4 +1Withabeti - WhithabetyxxxElena Sgarbo
4Mungree
Nikki Graham
4corianderxxxtrans4u
4Cumunger?
Parrot
4CuriungaSheilann


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Curiunga


Explanation:
Cure hunger. Curar is also cure in Spanish.

Sheilann
Spain
Local time: 07:25
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 886
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

34 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Withabeti - Whithabety


Explanation:
Pronounced like "with appetite".

Or: Hundry - Hendry, to sound like "hungry"

Or: Egertweet, for "eager to eat"

Suerte
Elena

xxxElena Sgarbo
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 3539

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  marsol: Me gusta Egertweet
1 hr
  -> Gracias Marsol
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Cumunger?


Explanation:
'Ungry for short (Going back to the Latin roots in Cockney...)

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 07:25
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 7645
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Hungrydragon


Explanation:
mouthfuldragon
glutdragon
stuffdragon (ji ji ji ji)
gorgedragon
dragonsnack (ja ja ja)
bellydragon
hungrybellydragon (it's almost lunch time for me)
crunch, nibble, chewey, chomp, nip, pinch, wolfdown, gobble, gnaw...

Ah, enough! This is fun, but I don't envy you my friend! Good luck

Camara
United States
Local time: 01:25
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 82
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Guttoongree


Explanation:
I fill it appears like an old english name and it is not so evident as a name using the "W" as initial letter.

I think the double letters help to the effect of the name.

Good luck :-) :-)

You could find inspiration in Tolkien books (The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, etc). Tolkien's names are amazing!


pedrores
Local time: 01:25
PRO pts in pair: 11
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
coriander


Explanation:
How about the name of an herb?

coriander-cilantro.

Here´s another one: "curry and broth"

Well, so much for inspiration.

Best of luck!
Bye


xxxtrans4u
PRO pts in pair: 308
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone; please visit the question page to see my additional comments. We went with the name "Curiambre", with the king mis-hearing it as "Coriander". Besides this choice, I particularly liked "Egertweet", "Mungree" and "Curry and broth", among others. I wish it were possible to use more than one of the many clever and creative suggestions! By coincidence, I happen to be reading LOTR just now. At the moment when I was racking my brains over the names in this story, the orcs had just carried off Merry and Pippin. I'm also reading Tolkien's collected correspondence. A linguistics professor, he had some strong ideas on the translation of his work. He felt that the original English names should be retained; that translators should not try to invent equivalents in the target language.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day 26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Mungree


Explanation:
for "I'm hungry". Given that it's for children, I think the connection has to be very obvious.

HTH

Nikki Graham
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:25
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 5584
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

9 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
I agree, it is better keft the original names!


Explanation:
It is virtually imposible to translate the sound, the "music" of a word, specially when the word is a name.

Could you translate "Don Quijote"?
Could you translate "Bilbo Baggins"?
and "Beorn" (that sounds like a bear roar).....

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-02-08 02:20:06 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

;-) pardon!!!
left... not \"keft\" ;-)

pedrores
Local time: 01:25
PRO pts in pair: 11
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search