KudoZ home » Spanish to English » Art/Literary

epistemes

English translation: epistemes

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:epistemes
English translation:epistemes
Entered by: Nikki Graham
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

12:39 Jul 15, 2002
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary / B.S.
Spanish term or phrase: epistemes
En alguna medida la obra del artista formula este cambio de epistemes mientras refleja ansiedades contemporáneas en relación a la fragilidad del ser y del sistema social por medio de estas particulares referencias

I must have been really bad in a former life.
MJ Barber
Spain
Local time: 18:55
More info
Explanation:
Foucault's account in 'The Order of Things' is useful here. Foucault outlines the notion of 'epistemes' as constitutive of particular world-views at particular historical periods. "An episteme is, very roughly, a conceptual grid that provides conceptions of order, sign and language that allow a series of discursive practices to qualify a 'knowledge'" (Gregory: 21) (note: there is a correspondence, here, between Foucault's 'macro' epistemes and Kuhn's notion of 'paradigms', to be discussed later). Foucault charts the transformation from the Renaissance episteme of 'resemblance'; "a way of thinking and being in the world in which there was no gap between 'words' and 'things', no difference between signs on parchment and signs in nature" (ibid), to the 'classical' episteme in which a gap between words and things was opened up; 'resemblance' yielded to 'representation'. In this classical episteme, science (or 'natural history') takes up the role of navigating between the word and object, a role designed "to bring language as close as possible to the observing gaze, and the things observed as close as possible to words" (Foucault q.v. Gregory: 21). In the classical episteme science is aligned with representation.

Epistemes are the general rules societies follow that shape a period of thought and rationality. Eileen Hooper-Greenhill defines and explains three epistemes that have shaped Western civilization since the Renaissance in her essay "What Is a Museum?" These are the Renaissance episteme, the classical episteme, and the modern episteme.

See the refs for much more info, and good luck!
Selected response from:

Nikki Graham
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:55
Grading comment
Marvellous explanation, thanks very much.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +7(don't translate)xxxR.J.Chadwick
4 +1More info
Nikki Graham


  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
(don't translate)


Explanation:
This is a term from French post-modernist, post-structuralist theory -- or something like that -- goes back to Foucault.

It is a technical term which has been used in a Spanish text in its French form -- so why translate into English.

The English form is the same, anyway.

A barbarism -- composed by the conjunction of epistemology and -emic. The latter (i.e. -emic) being a term from the fashionsble science of linguistics, formed in a paradigm with "phoneme", "morpheme", "tagmeme" etc.

What it means is another question altogether.

xxxR.J.Chadwick
Local time: 00:55
PRO pts in pair: 218

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nikki Graham
5 mins
  -> Thank you for your support

agree  Magdalena Villaronga
20 mins
  -> Thank you

agree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: it is the same word in English. Smallest philosphical notion. Not a barbarism. It has a meaning....
39 mins
  -> Thank you

agree  Сергей Лузан: Sí, según Collins.
1 hr
  -> Thank you

agree  Tania Marques-Cardoso: Just reminding that the word 'episteme' is originally Greek, meaning knowlege. Not a barbarism at all.
3 hrs
  -> Thank you for pointing that out

agree  luskie
6 hrs
  -> Thank you

agree  slavist
16 hrs
  -> Thanks
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
More info


Explanation:
Foucault's account in 'The Order of Things' is useful here. Foucault outlines the notion of 'epistemes' as constitutive of particular world-views at particular historical periods. "An episteme is, very roughly, a conceptual grid that provides conceptions of order, sign and language that allow a series of discursive practices to qualify a 'knowledge'" (Gregory: 21) (note: there is a correspondence, here, between Foucault's 'macro' epistemes and Kuhn's notion of 'paradigms', to be discussed later). Foucault charts the transformation from the Renaissance episteme of 'resemblance'; "a way of thinking and being in the world in which there was no gap between 'words' and 'things', no difference between signs on parchment and signs in nature" (ibid), to the 'classical' episteme in which a gap between words and things was opened up; 'resemblance' yielded to 'representation'. In this classical episteme, science (or 'natural history') takes up the role of navigating between the word and object, a role designed "to bring language as close as possible to the observing gaze, and the things observed as close as possible to words" (Foucault q.v. Gregory: 21). In the classical episteme science is aligned with representation.

Epistemes are the general rules societies follow that shape a period of thought and rationality. Eileen Hooper-Greenhill defines and explains three epistemes that have shaped Western civilization since the Renaissance in her essay "What Is a Museum?" These are the Renaissance episteme, the classical episteme, and the modern episteme.

See the refs for much more info, and good luck!


    Reference: http://www.csad.coventry.ac.uk/IDN/neopraxis/psci.htm
    Reference: http://people.clemson.edu/~methomp/museum/classical_episteme...
Nikki Graham
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:55
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 5584
Grading comment
Marvellous explanation, thanks very much.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxR.J.Chadwick: Nice review of the intended meaning.
1 hr
  -> Thanks!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search