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hombres de letras

English translation: men of letters

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:hombres de letras
English translation:men of letters
Entered by: Andrea Bullrich
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

05:59 Aug 23, 2001
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
Spanish term or phrase: hombres de letras
In a literary context
Clara
Men of letters
Explanation:
Esto es sólo para confirmar la respuesta de Alejandra, y para muestra:

ENGLISH MEN OF LETTERS
MARIA EDGEWORTH
BY THE
HON. EMILY LAWLESS
New York
THE MACMILLAN COMPANY
LONDON: MACMILLAN & CO., LTD.
1905
All rights reserved

Lives of Men of Letters and Science,
who flourished in the time of George III
Henry, Lord Brougham
2 Volume(s)

Broughton, Trev (University of York)
Men of Letters, Writing Lives: Masculinity and Literary Auto/Biography in the Late Victorian Period
Routledge, April 1999, 224 pp., ISBN (cloth) 0-415-08211-0, $85.00, ISBN (paperback) 0-415-08212-9, $24.99

Description:
Men of Letters, Writing Lives takes an in-depth look at the developments within Victorian autobiography and biography, and asks what we can learn about the conditions and limits of male literary authority. The book focuses on two case studies from the period 1880-1903: the theories and achievements of Sir Leslie Stephen and the debate surrounding James Anthony Groude's account of the marriage of Thomas and Jane Welsh Carlyle. Providing a feminist analysis of the effects of this literary production on culture, Trev Broughton argues that the modernization of life writing was due to the commercialization of the life-and-letters industry and the proliferation of professions with a vested interest in the written life.


From the New York American
April 22, 1910
[Anonymous]

Chief of American Men of Letters
MARK TWAIN IS DEAD.
It would be hard to frame four other words that could carry a message of personal bereavement to so many Americans.

He was easily the chief of our writers, by the only valid test. He could touch the emotional centre of more lives than any other.

He was curiously and intimately American. No other author has such a tang of the soil--such a flavor of the average national mind.

Europeans who complain that we denied Walt Whitman, misunderstood Emerson and have admired only those who write in old world fashions should be satisfied at least with Mark Twain, and with our unwavering taste for him.

He was our very own, and we gathered him to our hearts.

In ages to come, if historians and archaeologists would know the thoughts, the temper, the characteristic psychology of the American of the latter half of the nineteenth century, he will need only to read "Innocents Abroad," "Tom Sawyer," and "Huckleberry Finn."

Mr. Clemens's books were the transcripts of his life. And that life was the kind of life that the average American man of his time has believed in and admired.

He was the man that rose from the ranks without envy or condescension.

The man that hated dogmas and philosophies and loved a flash of intellectual light.

He was the man that cared much to get rich, yet would sweat blood to pay his debts.

The man of boundless optimism, who has never troubled to understand the great tragedies of nations.

The deepening sense of the twentieth century--with its feeling that there are social problems that cannot be resolved by pleasantries--has somehow left our dear prophet, with all his delicate and tender ironies and his merry quips, a little in the rear.

Mark Twain was never fortunate in his polemics. He was not effective as the champion of a cause. What he wrote of the Congo was hardly more creditable or convincing than his crusade against Mrs. Eddy.

He had no natural acerbity, and consequently no real talent for satire.

His genius was full of bravery and brightness and the joy of life.

And in the strength of his serene and laughing spirit generations of Americans will go forth to do deeds that he himself could never have conceived.




Selected response from:

Camara
United States
Local time: 11:48
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +7Men of lettersAlessandra Hall
na +2Men of letters
Camara
na +1literati
Parrot
naAcademic PersonIvan Sanchez


  

Answers


2 mins peer agreement (net): +7
Men of letters


Explanation:
As in those whose expertise lies in writing, rhetoric or any other subject related to language.

Alessandra Hall
United States
Local time: 11:48
PRO pts in pair: 7

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gabriela Tenenbaum: though it sounds weird, THIS is the correct way to say it!
11 mins

agree  GoodWords: A google search will prove that this is a common term.
28 mins

agree  mónica alfonso
1 hr

agree  xxxtazdog
2 hrs

agree  Andrea Bullrich
2 hrs

disagree  xxxNLRC: Correct translation, but certainly not common, try a quoted search in Altavista - only 20 results!!!
3 hrs

agree  Nikki Graham: and alltheweb too
3 hrs

agree  Patricia Lutteral
8 hrs

agree  DR. RICHARD BAVRY
18 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 mins
Academic Person


Explanation:
Just a hint..seems more "English".
Luck!

Ivan Sanchez
Local time: 11:48
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 168

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Cecilia Coopman, M.A. in Translation: Yes, it is more natural
13 mins

disagree  GoodWords: This term is not used in a literary context; "men of letters" is.
24 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
literati


Explanation:
lit., "lettered men". This is an accepted borrowing from Italian. I'd take it as eminently literary.

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 17:48
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 7645

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  flaviofbg: It may be from other language but it is not the correct Italian (eg: letterati)
22 mins

agree  Heather Laidlaw: But it's good English
1 hr

agree  Patricia Lutteral: This is also OK. And Flavio, you're right, it's borrowed from Latin (pl. of "literatus", scholar) :-)
5 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 hrs peer agreement (net): +2
Men of letters


Explanation:
Esto es sólo para confirmar la respuesta de Alejandra, y para muestra:

ENGLISH MEN OF LETTERS
MARIA EDGEWORTH
BY THE
HON. EMILY LAWLESS
New York
THE MACMILLAN COMPANY
LONDON: MACMILLAN & CO., LTD.
1905
All rights reserved

Lives of Men of Letters and Science,
who flourished in the time of George III
Henry, Lord Brougham
2 Volume(s)

Broughton, Trev (University of York)
Men of Letters, Writing Lives: Masculinity and Literary Auto/Biography in the Late Victorian Period
Routledge, April 1999, 224 pp., ISBN (cloth) 0-415-08211-0, $85.00, ISBN (paperback) 0-415-08212-9, $24.99

Description:
Men of Letters, Writing Lives takes an in-depth look at the developments within Victorian autobiography and biography, and asks what we can learn about the conditions and limits of male literary authority. The book focuses on two case studies from the period 1880-1903: the theories and achievements of Sir Leslie Stephen and the debate surrounding James Anthony Groude's account of the marriage of Thomas and Jane Welsh Carlyle. Providing a feminist analysis of the effects of this literary production on culture, Trev Broughton argues that the modernization of life writing was due to the commercialization of the life-and-letters industry and the proliferation of professions with a vested interest in the written life.


From the New York American
April 22, 1910
[Anonymous]

Chief of American Men of Letters
MARK TWAIN IS DEAD.
It would be hard to frame four other words that could carry a message of personal bereavement to so many Americans.

He was easily the chief of our writers, by the only valid test. He could touch the emotional centre of more lives than any other.

He was curiously and intimately American. No other author has such a tang of the soil--such a flavor of the average national mind.

Europeans who complain that we denied Walt Whitman, misunderstood Emerson and have admired only those who write in old world fashions should be satisfied at least with Mark Twain, and with our unwavering taste for him.

He was our very own, and we gathered him to our hearts.

In ages to come, if historians and archaeologists would know the thoughts, the temper, the characteristic psychology of the American of the latter half of the nineteenth century, he will need only to read "Innocents Abroad," "Tom Sawyer," and "Huckleberry Finn."

Mr. Clemens's books were the transcripts of his life. And that life was the kind of life that the average American man of his time has believed in and admired.

He was the man that rose from the ranks without envy or condescension.

The man that hated dogmas and philosophies and loved a flash of intellectual light.

He was the man that cared much to get rich, yet would sweat blood to pay his debts.

The man of boundless optimism, who has never troubled to understand the great tragedies of nations.

The deepening sense of the twentieth century--with its feeling that there are social problems that cannot be resolved by pleasantries--has somehow left our dear prophet, with all his delicate and tender ironies and his merry quips, a little in the rear.

Mark Twain was never fortunate in his polemics. He was not effective as the champion of a cause. What he wrote of the Congo was hardly more creditable or convincing than his crusade against Mrs. Eddy.

He had no natural acerbity, and consequently no real talent for satire.

His genius was full of bravery and brightness and the joy of life.

And in the strength of his serene and laughing spirit generations of Americans will go forth to do deeds that he himself could never have conceived.






Camara
United States
Local time: 11:48
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 82

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Patricia Lutteral: Hey, great references! :-)
4 hrs
  -> T. Y.

agree  DR. RICHARD BAVRY: I "lutteraly" agree
13 hrs
  -> T. Y.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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