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apurada

English translation: be late on the brakes (outbraking)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:apurada
English translation:be late on the brakes (outbraking)
Entered by: Chanda Danley
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12:18 Sep 7, 2006
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Automotive / Cars & Trucks / racing
Spanish term or phrase: apurada
Término que se usa en el argot de competición de motos. Se trata de una maniobra por la que el piloto de una moto. cuando llega a una curva. no frena hasta el último momento para poder ganar tiempo o adelantar a su contrincante.


I have found a few terms, but not sure which if any is the correct one: railing, attack, break/breakaway, carve
(from:
http://www.bicyclesource.com/you/culture/bicycling-glossary....
Chanda Danley
Spain
Local time: 13:51
be late on the brakes
Explanation:
This is the expression I´ve heard from bikers themselves and on British Eurosport (Moto GP, Superbikes, etc.)

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Note added at 58 mins (2006-09-07 13:17:01 GMT)
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Just thought of something. When someone is late on the brakes in order to overtake a competitor, you can say that they are "outbraking" the competitor.

http://motor-racing.lycos.co.uk/html/2326.xml.html
http://www.castrol.com/castrol/sectiongenericarticle.do?cate...

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Note added at 59 mins (2006-09-07 13:18:10 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

From the Castrol reference:

"The brave can attempt to outbrake their rivals and pass into the looping right-hander at Stowe. Another potential overtaking opportunity is at Bridge corner, but it’s not for the faint-hearted."
Selected response from:

Mar Brotons
Spain
Local time: 13:51
Grading comment
Muchas gracias Mar!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5to accelerate; to hurryManuel Rossetti
4be late on the brakes
Mar Brotons
4breakaway.........
Robert Copeland


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
breakaway.........


Explanation:
ya

Robert Copeland
United States
Local time: 07:51
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
be late on the brakes


Explanation:
This is the expression I´ve heard from bikers themselves and on British Eurosport (Moto GP, Superbikes, etc.)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 58 mins (2006-09-07 13:17:01 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Just thought of something. When someone is late on the brakes in order to overtake a competitor, you can say that they are "outbraking" the competitor.

http://motor-racing.lycos.co.uk/html/2326.xml.html
http://www.castrol.com/castrol/sectiongenericarticle.do?cate...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 59 mins (2006-09-07 13:18:10 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

From the Castrol reference:

"The brave can attempt to outbrake their rivals and pass into the looping right-hander at Stowe. Another potential overtaking opportunity is at Bridge corner, but it’s not for the faint-hearted."



    Reference: http://www.club100.co.uk/lydd.htm
    Reference: http://www.streetbiker-mag.com/sb0141/sport.html
Mar Brotons
Spain
Local time: 13:51
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in CatalanCatalan
PRO pts in category: 16
Grading comment
Muchas gracias Mar!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
to accelerate; to hurry


Explanation:
I've seen apurar y apresurar used as to hurry, to rush. However apurar also means to accelerate. I got that from my Spanish english/english spanish The University of Chicago Dictionary.



Example sentence(s):
  • i got that from my Spanish english/english spanish The University of Chicago Dictionary.
Manuel Rossetti
Local time: 12:51
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