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trupillales y cardonales

English translation: groves of Piptadenia and columnar cactus

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:trupillales y cardonales
English translation:groves of Piptadenia and columnar cactus
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04:05 Dec 16, 2010
    The asker opted for community grading. The question was closed on 2010-12-19 12:54:10 based on peer agreement (or, if there were too few peer comments, asker preference.)


Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Science - Botany
Spanish term or phrase: trupillales y cardonales
these are describing plants or trees found in forests in Colombia, from the same text I was working on earlier....
Suzette Martin-Johnson
Canada
groves of Piptadenia and columnar cactus
Explanation:
1. trupillales: groups of trupillos
TRUPÍO o TRUPILLO: Arbol de aproximadamente 12 o 14 metros de altura [...] A los terrenos donde abunda se les llama trupillales. [...] Su nombre científico es Piptadenia Sp. [...]."
See Beatriz's reference for full quotation.
http://www.banrepcultural.org/blaavirtual/modosycostumbres/l...
This tree seems to have no established common name in English and it's best to use the genus name Piptadenia:
"Piptadenia is native to Venezuela. It reaches a height of 50 feet, with a trunk 2.5 feet or more in diameter supported by prop roots. [...]"
http://web.me.com/jamarimutt/arbolesrum/piptadenia.html

2. cardonales: groups of cardones.
Cardón is a name that corresponds to different plants in different places. In the Canary Islands it's a familiar plant, Euphorbia canariensis, that looks a bit like a columnar cactus but is actually a spurge (euphorbia) and is called Canarian spurge in English. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euphorbia_canariensis if interested. In different parts of South America it is the common name for various cactus species: Cereus peruvianus var. monstruosus (http://fichas.infojardin.com/cactus/cereus-peruvianus-monstr... Trichocereus pasacana (NE Argentina and S Bolivia), etc.
But in Colombia it seems to be the name for two particular species: Cephalocereus colombianus, and in La Guajira, "la región árida más seca y extensa del país, cubierta de espinares, cardonales y matorrales subxerófilos", Lemaireocereus
griseus
(see Facebook group Cactus de Colombia at http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=104569987112 ). But both Cephalocereus colombianus, also known as Pilosocereus lanuginosus, and Lemaireocereus griseus, also known as Stenocereus griseus, are columnar cacti with no established name in English. Again, Beatriz's reference is right.

3. groves seems the best word in English to cover groups or areas of specific trees or cacti within a forest. "Cactus groves", for example, is common (just Google it).


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Note added at 5 hrs (2010-12-16 09:49:16 GMT)
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One last reference I forgot to copy at the end, very useful for cactus species (with photos): http://www.desert-tropicals.com/Plants/Cactaceae

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs (2010-12-16 09:51:30 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As a variant of my answer, you could also say "groves of Piptadenia and columnar cacti"; it depends whether you want to refer to the singular species (cactus) or the plural plants (cacti).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs (2010-12-16 10:59:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I've just seen Rachel's reference from Wikipedia. She's quite right; I neglected to consider the possibility that the trupíos/trupillos here are not Piptadenia but Prosopis juliflora, as is mentioned in the passage from Consuelo Araujo Noguera's "Lexicon del Valle de Upar", quoted in full by Beatriz in her reference (http://www.banrepcultural.org/blaavirtual/modosycostumbres/l... They really could be either, from the information we have; both are common in Colombia. If the asker can establish that they are definitely Prosopis juriflora, because of the region or whatever, then either use the Latin name (safest, though a bit formal for some contexts) or use the common (Caribbean) English name "cashaw", which is a riskier bet, because although it's a species of Prosopis it's not necessarily the right one, and the difference could matter. But if in doubt, I'd be inclined to leave it as Piptadenia, which is neater.
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 00:07
Grading comment
Thanks for this pensive answer!!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4groves of Piptadenia and columnar cactus
Charles Davis
Summary of reference entries provided
transl8_2
trupillo
Rachel Fell

  

Answers


5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
groves of Piptadenia and columnar cactus


Explanation:
1. trupillales: groups of trupillos
TRUPÍO o TRUPILLO: Arbol de aproximadamente 12 o 14 metros de altura [...] A los terrenos donde abunda se les llama trupillales. [...] Su nombre científico es Piptadenia Sp. [...]."
See Beatriz's reference for full quotation.
http://www.banrepcultural.org/blaavirtual/modosycostumbres/l...
This tree seems to have no established common name in English and it's best to use the genus name Piptadenia:
"Piptadenia is native to Venezuela. It reaches a height of 50 feet, with a trunk 2.5 feet or more in diameter supported by prop roots. [...]"
http://web.me.com/jamarimutt/arbolesrum/piptadenia.html

2. cardonales: groups of cardones.
Cardón is a name that corresponds to different plants in different places. In the Canary Islands it's a familiar plant, Euphorbia canariensis, that looks a bit like a columnar cactus but is actually a spurge (euphorbia) and is called Canarian spurge in English. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euphorbia_canariensis if interested. In different parts of South America it is the common name for various cactus species: Cereus peruvianus var. monstruosus (http://fichas.infojardin.com/cactus/cereus-peruvianus-monstr... Trichocereus pasacana (NE Argentina and S Bolivia), etc.
But in Colombia it seems to be the name for two particular species: Cephalocereus colombianus, and in La Guajira, "la región árida más seca y extensa del país, cubierta de espinares, cardonales y matorrales subxerófilos", Lemaireocereus
griseus
(see Facebook group Cactus de Colombia at http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=104569987112 ). But both Cephalocereus colombianus, also known as Pilosocereus lanuginosus, and Lemaireocereus griseus, also known as Stenocereus griseus, are columnar cacti with no established name in English. Again, Beatriz's reference is right.

3. groves seems the best word in English to cover groups or areas of specific trees or cacti within a forest. "Cactus groves", for example, is common (just Google it).


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs (2010-12-16 09:49:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

One last reference I forgot to copy at the end, very useful for cactus species (with photos): http://www.desert-tropicals.com/Plants/Cactaceae

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs (2010-12-16 09:51:30 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As a variant of my answer, you could also say "groves of Piptadenia and columnar cacti"; it depends whether you want to refer to the singular species (cactus) or the plural plants (cacti).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs (2010-12-16 10:59:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I've just seen Rachel's reference from Wikipedia. She's quite right; I neglected to consider the possibility that the trupíos/trupillos here are not Piptadenia but Prosopis juliflora, as is mentioned in the passage from Consuelo Araujo Noguera's "Lexicon del Valle de Upar", quoted in full by Beatriz in her reference (http://www.banrepcultural.org/blaavirtual/modosycostumbres/l... They really could be either, from the information we have; both are common in Colombia. If the asker can establish that they are definitely Prosopis juriflora, because of the region or whatever, then either use the Latin name (safest, though a bit formal for some contexts) or use the common (Caribbean) English name "cashaw", which is a riskier bet, because although it's a species of Prosopis it's not necessarily the right one, and the difference could matter. But if in doubt, I'd be inclined to leave it as Piptadenia, which is neater.

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 00:07
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 63
Grading comment
Thanks for this pensive answer!!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Reference comments


1 hr peer agreement (net): +1
Reference

Reference information:
"TRUPÍO o TRUPILLO: Arbol de aproximadamente 12 o 14 metros de altura, de follaje frondoso, ramas irregulares y vidriosas, hojas menuditas parecidas a las del tamarindo, que siempre se mantienen verdes aun en épocas de intenso verano; flores de color amarillo dorado y muy fragantes, fruto que es una legumbre dura y encorvada que sirve de alimento al ganado y que se llama trupía. Su madera, recia y blanca produce una resma gomosa muy útil en menesteres domésticos, en carpintería y en la farmacopea casera. Cuando está pequeño, el trupío es ni mas ni menos idéntico a un espino. Se da muy abundante en Valledupar y a los terrenos donde abunda se les llama TRUPILLALES. Pertenece a la familia de las mimosáceas y su nombre científico es Piptadenia Sp. Hay otra especie que es la Prosopis juliiflora."

http://www.banrepcultural.org/blaavirtual/modosycostumbres/l...

==============
COMMUNAL FOREST MANAGEMENT IN CHIQUIACA, BOLIVIA
Gabriela GUTIÉRREZ PÉREZ, PROMETA, Tarija, BOLIVIA
Introduction

Forest management is the planning and execution of approaches to forestry, its economic, ecological and social characteristics, the result of which assures the sustainability of forest production and its quality.(…)

Common name Scientific name Family
(…)
Chari Piptadenia sp. Leguminosa
(…)

http://www.fao.org/docrep/004/y9351e/Y9351E37.htm

=============

Columnar cactus forests, known as CARDONALES, are found in the drier parts of this zone, which has a much lower density of human population than the higher ...

books.google.com/books?isbn=2831703905...

(“Cactus and succulent plants: status survey and conservation action plan”, by Sara Oldfield, IUCN/SSC Cactus and Succulent Specialist Group)

=========
HTH!
beatriz souza

transl8_2
Brazil
Works in field
Native speaker of: Portuguese

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  Charles Davis
5 hrs
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6 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
Reference: trupillo

Reference information:
This is a well-known plant in its native range as well as in India, having a range of vernacular names, although no widely used English one. It is called bayahonda blanca in Spanish and bayarone Français in French

In the Wayuu language, spoken on the La Guajira Peninsula in northern Colombia and Venezuela, it is called trupillo or turpío.[4]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prosopis_juliflora

Rachel Fell
United Kingdom
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 52

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  Charles Davis
55 mins
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