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doctor (titulo en una carta)

English translation: Dear Sir (unless we're sure the adressee has a Ph.D.)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:doctor (titulo en una carta)
English translation:Dear Sir (unless we're sure the adressee has a Ph.D.)
Entered by: María Teresa Taylor Oliver
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20:58 Dec 13, 2003
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Bus/Financial
Spanish term or phrase: doctor (titulo en una carta)
Es una carta originada en Colombia, y en el inicio pone:

"**Doctor**
Fulano de Tal
Presidente
Banco de Tal
Colombia

Apreciado **doctor**:"

Mi pregunta es: ¿en estos casos, cómo se pone en inglés? ¿olvido lo de "doctor" y pongo simplemente "sir"?

Gracias,
~*MT*~
María Teresa Taylor Oliver
Panama
Local time: 04:34
Dear Sir
Explanation:
Unless the man has a PhD. or is some other type of medical doctor, dentist, etc., that's all you can do.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 mins (2003-12-13 21:18:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

No, it\'s not necessary to keep the title in English and it\'s not correct unless you\'re 100% sure... Doctor is generally used in Spanish as a sign of respect, whether or not someone as a PhD.
Selected response from:

Marian Greenfield
Local time: 04:34
Grading comment
Thank you, Marian, and Elena, too. I wasn't sure, since Elena is quite right also, but the comment about the "Dr." being dropped outside University circles did it for me. And though maybe the person does have a Ph.D., and it would be quite correct to leave the title in the letter, Marian made a good point of it being used as a sign of respect (I know it's very common in Colombia, where my document originated), and so I cannot be 100% sure. Anyway, since it's not mentioned later in the document, I decided to leave it out altogether.

Such a long explanation for such a little word :)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +9Dear Dr. XX,xxxElena Sgarbo
5 +2Dear Sir
Marian Greenfield
5doctor
Kathy Figueroa


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
doctor


Explanation:
Dr. Fulano de Tal
President...
Dear Dr. Fulano de Tal

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-12-13 21:06:01 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I would keep it. He earned it.

Kathy Figueroa
United States
Local time: 01:34
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +9
Dear Dr. XX,


Explanation:
Así es el saludo luego del encabezado de la carta aquí en USA, incluyendo el nombre nuevamente después del t´tiulo (Dr, Mr, Ms).

(Las "business letters" a mí me llegan como "Dear Dr. Sgarbossa").

Suerte María Teresa
Elena

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-12-13 21:35:44 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

María Teresa,

In the several U.S. Universities where I\'ve worked, our PhD\'s have always been addressed as \"Doctor\" in letters, memos, and formal meetings.

HTH

xxxElena Sgarbo
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 3539

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nikki Graham
49 mins
  -> Thanks Nikki, saludos :-)

agree  liliherre
2 hrs
  -> Thanks María

agree  Rantes: If it is a doctor or Phd you call it Doctor
5 hrs
  -> Thanks Rantes

agree  Sp-EnTranslator
7 hrs
  -> Thanks Claudia

agree  Marcela Robaina Boyd
14 hrs
  -> Gracias Marcela

agree  Arcoiris: that clearly is the title the person chooses for himself. We should address people by their choosen method
16 hrs
  -> Thanks Apricitas

agree  María Isabel Estévez (maisa)
21 hrs
  -> Gracias maisa

agree  Mikel Yarza Dietrich
21 hrs
  -> Gracias Mikel

agree  Refugio: But the title Dr. is often dropped outside of universities
2 days 2 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Dear Sir


Explanation:
Unless the man has a PhD. or is some other type of medical doctor, dentist, etc., that's all you can do.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 mins (2003-12-13 21:18:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

No, it\'s not necessary to keep the title in English and it\'s not correct unless you\'re 100% sure... Doctor is generally used in Spanish as a sign of respect, whether or not someone as a PhD.

Marian Greenfield
Local time: 04:34
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 14613
Grading comment
Thank you, Marian, and Elena, too. I wasn't sure, since Elena is quite right also, but the comment about the "Dr." being dropped outside University circles did it for me. And though maybe the person does have a Ph.D., and it would be quite correct to leave the title in the letter, Marian made a good point of it being used as a sign of respect (I know it's very common in Colombia, where my document originated), and so I cannot be 100% sure. Anyway, since it's not mentioned later in the document, I decided to leave it out altogether.

Such a long explanation for such a little word :)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  sileugenia: Exacto, Marian.
2 hrs

agree  Adriana Torres
5 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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