para alterar a posteriori el precio

English translation: to alter the price at a later stage

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09:08 May 8, 2018
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Bus/Financial - Business/Commerce (general) / Construction / Civil Engineering
Spanish term or phrase: para alterar a posteriori el precio
I am unsure how to translate this phrase, is 'a posteriori' something which can be used as it is in English? Does anyone have any examples of it being used in a sentence in English? If you can't use it how it is, what is the best translation?

Thanks in advance :)
xxxJeffinerRosi
United Kingdom
English translation:to alter the price at a later stage
Explanation:
Or retrospectively, or subsequently, depending on your context.

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Note added at 3 hrs (2018-05-08 12:26:54 GMT)
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The opposite is a priori, meaning beforehand. Again, we wouldn't use Latin.
Selected response from:

philgoddard
United States
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +7to alter the price at a later stage
philgoddard
4 +5a posteriori
Posted via ProZ.com Mobile
Soledad Ortiz Cejas
Summary of reference entries provided
A posteriori
Robert Carter

Discussion entries: 6





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
a posteriori


Explanation:
I found it in scientific context.


    Reference: http://https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S15...
Soledad Ortiz Cejas
New Zealand
Local time: 20:25
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  neilmac: A buenas horas, mangas verdes... (Parece que la JeffinerRosie5 se ha ido a tomar un café...)
12 mins

neutral  philgoddard: But this is not a scientific context. It's also used in philosophy, but Latin is quite unnecessary here.
1 hr

agree  AllegroTrans: Disagree with Phil; I often see this in legal pleadings etc. but we need to see the full sentence to judge whether it's appropriate here
4 hrs

agree  JohnMcDove
5 hrs

agree  Robert Carter: This is the safest bet, but it really depends on what the author understands about this phrase and what they're trying to say.
8 hrs

agree  Yvonne Gallagher: with Robert
9 days
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
to alter the price at a later stage


Explanation:
Or retrospectively, or subsequently, depending on your context.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2018-05-08 12:26:54 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The opposite is a priori, meaning beforehand. Again, we wouldn't use Latin.


    Reference: http://dictionary.reverso.net/spanish-english/Posteriori
philgoddard
United States
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 242
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Robert Forstag: I also do not think the Latin term would be used here in English, even in a formal contract.
4 mins
  -> Exactly. "A priori" is very common in French, meaning "on the face of it".

agree  franglish
7 mins

agree  James A. Walsh
1 hr

agree  writeaway: I don't translate Spanish (only 2 years in secondary) but I knew this one as soon as I saw it
2 hrs

agree  AllegroTrans: Valid answer but see my comment in DBox
2 hrs

agree  JohnMcDove: With Allegro. :-)
3 hrs

neutral  Robert Carter: It doesn't mean "later on"; it means based on observation of facts. This is really worth a disagree, but we don't know if the author has simply misused it the way I'm afraid you and the other agreers have too, which is evidently a possibility.
6 hrs

agree  Myriam Reagh
2 days 8 hrs
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Reference comments


10 hrs
Reference: A posteriori

Reference information:
There seems to be some confusion as to what this term is actually used to describe. It appears the relationship to "posterior" is leading to a simplification of "a posteriori" to "after", which isn't the whole story by any means.

A Priori and A Posteriori
The terms "a priori" and "a posteriori" are used primarily to denote the foundations upon which a proposition is known. A given proposition is knowable a priori if it can be known independent of any experience other than the experience of learning the language in which the proposition is expressed, whereas a proposition that is knowable a posteriori is known on the basis of experience. For example, the proposition that all bachelors are unmarried is a priori, and the proposition that it is raining outside now is a posteriori.

https://www.iep.utm.edu/apriori/

a posteriori - definition and synonyms

Using the thesaurus
ADJECTIVE, ADVERB VERY FORMAL a posteriori pronunciation in American English
/ˌɑ pɑstɪriˈɔri/ a posteriori pronunciation in American English
/ˌeɪ pɑstɪriˈɔˌraɪ/
Contribute to our Open Dictionary
using knowledge, evidence, or experience to make a judgment or decision about something that has already happened

https://www.macmillandictionary.com/us/dictionary/american/a...

a posteriori
Definition
Popular Terms
Conclusion or judgment based on induction. It begins with the observed facts and phenomenon, and infers their underlying causes. Latin for, what comes after. See also a priori.

http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/a-posteriori.ht...

a posteriori (eɪ pɒsˌtɛrɪˈɔːraɪ; -rɪ; ɑː)
adj
1. (Logic) relating to or involving inductive reasoning from particular facts or effects to a general principle
2. (Logic) derived from or requiring evidence for its validation or support; empirical; open to revision
3. (Statistics) statistics See posterior probability
[C18: from Latin, literally: from the latter (that is, from effect to cause)]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

https://www.thefreedictionary.com/a posteriori


Here is an entry from thesaurus.com where it can clearly be seen that "a posteriori" is in no way synonymous with "after":

Synonyms for a posteriori

adv involving reasoning from facts
analytical
empirical
experimental
from the latter
inducible
inductive
logical
practical

http://www.thesaurus.com/browse/a posteriori

Robert Carter
Mexico
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 120
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