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carne mechada

English translation: pot roast

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:carne mechada
English translation:pot roast
Entered by: Henry Hinds
Options:
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22:32 Jul 7, 2008
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary
Spanish term or phrase: carne mechada
Chilean meat dish
W. Mullins
pot roast, roast beef
Explanation:
I've had it many times in Chile, it's close to those.

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Note added at 1 hora (2008-07-08 00:17:31 GMT)
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"Pot roast" I think is the most accurate equivalent USA term.

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Note added at 2 horas (2008-07-08 00:39:29 GMT)
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I've also eaten it recently many times, and in Chile.
Selected response from:

Henry Hinds
United States
Local time: 10:04
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4larded meatmargaret caulfield
4 +3pot roast, roast beef
Henry Hinds
4 +1carne mechada
Marcelo González
5shredded meatmikellys


Discussion entries: 29





  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
larded meat


Explanation:
This a piece of meat (normally a roast) which is "channeled" with a long, slim poker and then the channels are stuffed with pieces of lard or bacon. This is to give the meat more taste and to ensure it does not turn out dry.

(23 years in industriall food services).

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Note added at 1 hr (2008-07-07 23:47:37 GMT)
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Marcelo, I did not have to look at Google to find this. I used to teach production methods in very large industrial feeding companies. However, after your comment, I have just looked at google and the results I find are:

Resultados 1 - 10 de aproximadamente 40.100 páginas en inglés de larded meat. (0,28 segundos)

So, I'm not too sure if you got the spelling right!

margaret caulfield
Local time: 18:04
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 36
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks Margaret larded meat is a good choice but the name is not so apetizing y think I will finally go with Chilean pot roast although weak is the best I think


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Steven Huddleston
4 mins
  -> Thanks Steven

agree  Rosina Peixoto: Eso es.
1 hr
  -> Gracias, Rosina

agree  Gerardo Garcia Ramis: Exactly, it's a typical PR dish, though stuffed with chopped ham or chorizo. Might sound "awful", but that's what it is, we're translators, not cheerleaders for meat producers.
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Gerardo. I must admit, I like your comment on translators and cheerleaders!

agree  Robert Mota
6 hrs
  -> Thanks, Robert
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
pot roast, roast beef


Explanation:
I've had it many times in Chile, it's close to those.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hora (2008-07-08 00:17:31 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

"Pot roast" I think is the most accurate equivalent USA term.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 horas (2008-07-08 00:39:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I've also eaten it recently many times, and in Chile.

Henry Hinds
United States
Local time: 10:04
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 44

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  E. David Curiel: Yes, I think *pot roast* is the best here.
9 hrs
  -> Gracias, David.

agree  Kate Major: I would definitely go for this. If the customers ask, they can be told about the fatty cooking methods which make it so tasty. Let's make it sound tasty, for Pete's sake! :)
10 hrs
  -> Gracias, Kate. Yes, it is a menu item.

agree  Marcelo González: If it must be translated, "pot roast" with a country-specific adjective (in this case, Chilean) is the way to go. That said, I still believe it's best to keep it the same (like tacos, tamales, paella and so many other foods). :-)
22 hrs
  -> Gracias, Marcelo.
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
shredded meat


Explanation:

While we were in Venezuela we eat shredded meat or "carne mechada", in the national dish "Pabellon"

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Carne Mechada is a slow-cooked and flavorful shredded beef that is an integral part of Venezuelan cuisine.

http://makeaheadmeals.blogspot.com/2008/01/23-carne-mechada....


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Note added at 5 hrs (2008-07-08 04:19:17 GMT)
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I missed your request for a chilean version of "carne mechada"
The Chilean version could be called "braised meat" until it falls off the fork

mikellys
United States
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  E. David Curiel: Mmmm...love me some pabellón criollo, but I think you're right in the country difference
3 hrs
  -> You are right E. David, Pabellon criollo is the correct name, and it is delicious!, but "desmenuzar la carne" must take for ever. :)
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
carne mechada


Explanation:
I would keep it the same (and maybe italicize it). :-)

"Larded meat" sounds aweful, and cannot imagine it being used (at least not in the US). As for pot roast, though perhaps similar, I don't believe it's precisely the same. In these cases, it's best to maintain the original (and perhaps include a parenthetical statement or footnote).

Resultados 1 - 10 de aproximadamente 222 de "larded meat". (0.05 segundos)
http://www.google.com.mx/search?hl=es&client=firefox-a&rls=o...

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Note added at 1 hr (2008-07-08 00:04:19 GMT)
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With all due respect to Margaret, "larded meat" might be a good option for readers in London, but it simply would not "fly" in Los Angeles (or any other health-conscious city in the US). In the end, it depends on the audience.

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Note added at 16 hrs (2008-07-08 14:43:38 GMT)
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If you must translate this, the best option might be "Chilean pot roast"; this way, you're recognizing its uniqueness, while including a familiar name of a common dish (at least in the US).

Marcelo González
North Mariana Isl.
Local time: 02:04
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  silviantonia: Actually, why not? I have used the original term in translation, where it is hard to translate... Perhaps CHilean carne mechada... /Ah, makes me miss eating meat...
1 day1 hr
  -> Exactly, why not? We do it all the time with other foods. :-) // "Chilean carne mechada" -- nice, depending on the restaurant (and its clientele), this might be a really good option :-)
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Changes made by editors
Jul 14, 2008 - Changes made by Henry Hinds:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term
Jul 9, 2008 - Changes made by PB Trans:
Field (specific)Food & Drink » Cooking / Culinary
Jul 8, 2008 - Changes made by Henry Hinds:
LevelNon-PRO » PRO


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