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desespumar

English translation: remove the froth; scrape off the froth

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:desespumar (paredes de un cazo)
English translation:remove the froth; scrape off the froth
Entered by: Hack
Options:
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13:11 Nov 21, 2008
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary
Spanish term or phrase: desespumar
Se trata de solamente azúcar hervido en agua, no de leche. Cuando se hierve azúcar (por ejemplo para trabajar con pastillaje o decorar con azúcar estirado) se crea espuma en las paredes del cazo que hay que retirar. Por eso no creo que el término 'skim off' sea muy adecuado aquí. Alguna sugerencia?
Hack
Local time: 06:04
remove the froth; scrape off the froth
Explanation:
2 possibilities.
(I don't think "de-froth" is possible, and "remove scum" sounds unappetising!)
Selected response from:

Carol Gullidge
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:04
Grading comment
Thanks Carol. You're always so helpful! :)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +6skim
Elizabeth Collins
3 +6remove the froth; scrape off the froth
Carol Gullidge
4"Pour off the foam(into another container)"
eski
4brush downJanine Libbey


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +6
remove the froth; scrape off the froth


Explanation:
2 possibilities.
(I don't think "de-froth" is possible, and "remove scum" sounds unappetising!)

Carol Gullidge
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:04
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 285
Grading comment
Thanks Carol. You're always so helpful! :)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kate Major: :) Have a good weekend.
22 mins
  -> many thanks Kate - same to you!

agree  moken: So there you go. :O)
1 hr
  -> many thanks Alvaro :O)

agree  Luis Javier Otoya
1 hr
  -> thanks Luis!

agree  Eileen Banks
2 hrs
  -> thanks Eileen!

agree  kironne: Absolutely!
9 hrs
  -> many thanks kironne!

agree  Alice Bootman: This fits best for removing the froth from the sides of the pot. "Scrape off the froth" me suena. : )
1 day55 mins
  -> many thanks Alice :O)
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
brush down


Explanation:
"brushing down sides of pan with wet pastry brush and swirling pan occasionally, about 10 minutes. "


    Reference: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/The-Perfect-Fla...
Janine Libbey
United States
Local time: 23:04
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 52

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Carol Gullidge: I like this, but, again, I'm not sure if it quite fits the context of removing the froth. I think the purpose of the wet pastry brush in yr recipe is more to minimise the formation of a hard toffee on the sides of the pan - but I could be wrong here!
46 mins
  -> Or you may be right! I don't recall foam in the pan when I've boiled sugar but I do remember having to brush down the sides of the pan.
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35 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +6
skim


Explanation:
I've been cooking all my life. it's called "skimming", whether you're dealing with meat stock, simmered milk, butter, or anything else.

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Note added at 1 day2 hrs (2008-11-22 16:05:38 GMT)
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i still would still call it "skim" on the sides of the pot, since it's the same motion, and i honestly haven't heard any other specific term for this. but there is always the alternative of merely explaining what you're doing and let the reader get out their skimmer and to it anyway.

Example sentence(s):
  • "Add deglazing liquid to stockpot along with 4 quarts water, celery, salt, and bouquet garni. Bring to a boil and skim froth."
  • "As the butter continues to simmer, use a ladle to skim the foam and milk solids from the surface of the liquefied butter. "

    Reference: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Beef-Stock-2312...
    Reference: http://culinaryarts.about.com/od/culinaryfundamentals/ss/cla...
Elizabeth Collins
United States
Local time: 23:04
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Notes to answerer
Asker: Can I still use 'skim' when referring to the sides of the saucepan?


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Elizabeth Joy Pitt de Morales: This is what I've always read in my cook books!
20 mins

agree  Kate Major: I think "skim" is also fine, to be fair: it doesn't have to be milk. However, if Hack doesn't want to use "skim" he has the alternative. Have a good weekend! :)
25 mins

agree  Elin Davies: yes, skim is what I've seem most for taking something off the surface of cooked/cooking liquid.
29 mins

agree  Gerardo Lucas Robles
31 mins

agree  Patrice
38 mins

agree  liz askew
43 mins

neutral  moken: Hi Elizabeth. The asker specified that the froth needs to be removed from the sides of the pot rather than from the surface of the liquid. Would you still use 'skim' in this context? :O)
56 mins
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1 day6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
"Pour off the foam(into another container)"


Explanation:
See see the procedure HERE:

www.pastrywiz.com/sugarart/sugarcooking.htm - 8k - En caché - Páginas similares

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Note added at 1 day6 hrs (2008-11-22 19:23:49 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Btw, I was just about to "agree" with one of my peers when I found this link : hope this helps. :)

eski
Mexico
Local time: 23:04
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 121
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