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"no apto" (nota académica)

English translation: non proficient

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:no apto
English translation:non proficient
Entered by: xxxOso
Options:
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- Include in personal glossary

20:34 Mar 5, 2002
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Education / Pedagogy / education
Spanish term or phrase: "no apto" (nota académica)
A student is described as having failed ("va suspendre") several subjects and gotten a "no apto" ("va ser «n.a.» a") in another. How are the two different?
xxxJon Zuber
non proficient
Explanation:
Hola Jon,
Pienso que "no apto" o "non proficient" está usado en el sentido de que el estudiante está desarrollando la habilidad en la materia, es decir que no es un fracaso absoluto, como en el caso de "failed".
Buena suerte y saludos del
Oso ¶:^)
Selected response from:

xxxOso
Grading comment
I'm putting "not proficient"; it sounds good, anyway. Thanks, Oso.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +7non proficientxxxOso
4 +3not pass
Germán Peralta
4 +2Oso comes close, Jon
Parrot
4 +1Not suitable
Paulina Gómez
4 -1Not qualified
Andrea Sacchi


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +7
non proficient


Explanation:
Hola Jon,
Pienso que "no apto" o "non proficient" está usado en el sentido de que el estudiante está desarrollando la habilidad en la materia, es decir que no es un fracaso absoluto, como en el caso de "failed".
Buena suerte y saludos del
Oso ¶:^)

xxxOso
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 105
Grading comment
I'm putting "not proficient"; it sounds good, anyway. Thanks, Oso.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Terry Burgess: I like it:-)))
2 mins
  -> Thanks my buddy!! ¶:^))

agree  Parrot
4 mins
  -> Gracias mi lorito favorito ¶:^)))

agree  José Luis Villanueva-Senchuk
8 mins
  -> Gracias Pepelu ¶:^))

agree  Andrea Sacchi
12 mins
  -> Gracias mil Andrea ¶:^)

agree  Bill Greendyk: Real nice way to say failed! Or "not proficient"
21 mins
  -> Gracias mil William ¶:^))

agree  MJ Barber
36 mins
  -> Muchas gracias Planxty ¶:^)))

agree  cnidario
11 hrs
  -> Muchas gracias ¶:^)
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Not suitable


Explanation:
It is stronger than "failed". Implies you cannott try again.

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Note added at 2002-03-05 20:41:23 (GMT)
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Sorry. can not

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-05 21:11:00 (GMT)
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Ive seen it in university contexts. (work experience) For example qualifying exams for Ph. D candidacy. Failed means a person has another chance, but if graded as not suitable / not a suitable candidate/ \"no apto\", there are strong reasons involving doubts, even ethical. But, as the exact ,even geographical context is unknown, I would agree with Andrea´s answer, not qualified.

Paulina Gómez
Colombia
Local time: 08:52
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in category: 11

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Myrtha
1 hr
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14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Oso comes close, Jon


Explanation:
Although for practical purposes, Suspenso/No apto come together in Spain, and I have not heard it said that you can't try again. However, my experience is limited to universities.

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 15:52
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 138

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Carolina Lopez Garcia
3 mins

agree  xxxOso: ¡Gracias! ¶:^))
10 hrs
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20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Not qualified


Explanation:
Perhaps it may help you.

Andrea Sacchi
Local time: 14:52
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 10

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Germán Peralta: I understand for this not have a mark
1 hr
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
not pass


Explanation:
I know by experience the following difference: "no apte" is oppossed to "apte", that is, you can pass the exam or can not pass it. This is usually found at Language exams.

"Suspés" may imply another possibilities such as "notable" or "aprobat", that is, it is included in a range.

Germán Peralta

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Carolina Lopez Garcia
21 mins
  -> thanks

agree  Dora O'Malley: Yes, this is used when a student failed the test
31 mins
  -> thanks

agree  xxxOso: ¶:^)
8 hrs
  -> thanks
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