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Anchoas saladas, descabezadas y eviscerada, sin panza y sin cola madurada en env

English translation: salted anchovies, headed and gutted, with the belly and tail removed, cured in plastic containers

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:Anchoas saladas, descabezadas y eviscerada, sin panza y sin cola madurada en env
English translation:salted anchovies, headed and gutted, with the belly and tail removed, cured in plastic containers
Entered by: Charles Davis
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10:59 Feb 23, 2012
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Fisheries
Spanish term or phrase: Anchoas saladas, descabezadas y eviscerada, sin panza y sin cola madurada en env
Estoy traduciendo un documento para una pesquera. En la descripción del producto, cuando enumera las características aparece lo siguiente: Anchoas saladas, descabezadas y eviscerada, sin panza y sin cola madurada en envases plásticos.
La primera parte la traduje de la siguiente forma: salted, headed and gutted anchovies. Cómo puedo traducir "sin panza y sin cola madurada en envases plásticos"?
Muchas gracias
Karina Rodriguez
Argentina
Local time: 05:10
salted anchovies, headed and gutted, with the belly and tail removed, cured in plastic containers
Explanation:
"Eviscerada" and "madurada" should be "evisceradas" and "maduradas"; both adjectives must refer to "anchoas".

There are alternatives here. "Headless" is quite commonly used instead of "headed", and "eviscerated" can be used instead of "gutted", but "headed and gutted" (H & G) is a very common term in the fish trade, so I would stay with that.

The "panza" is called the belly of the fish in English. It is not just a redundant repetition of "eviscerada". It means that as well as removing the guts of the fish, they cut off a small amount of flesh at the bottom of the belly, thereby also removing the ventral fin. And "cola" simply means "tail".

"Matured" can certainly be said for "madurada[s]", but "cured" is much more usual. They really mean the same thing. In English "matured" is normally used for anchovies cured in barrels.
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 10:10
Grading comment
MUCHAS GRACIAS!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3salted anchovies, headed and gutted, with the belly and tail removed, cured in plastic containers
Charles Davis
3Salted, headed, and gutted anchovies, matured in plastic containers with guts and fins removedSue Shepherd
4 -108.10Alessandra23


  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
08.10


Explanation:
take out stomach and tail and keep them in a plastic box

Example sentence(s):
  • without stomach and tail keep them in a plastic box
  • possono essere inserite in wikiwords

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Alessandra23

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Graham Allen-Rawlings: ?
20 mins
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23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Salted, headed, and gutted anchovies, matured in plastic containers with guts and fins removed


Explanation:
Sin panza seems to be a different way of saying eviscerada, so perhaps you could also just say "with fins removed" or "without fins" in the second part of the sentence.

Sue Shepherd
Local time: 10:10
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
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38 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
salted anchovies, headed and gutted, with the belly and tail removed, cured in plastic containers


Explanation:
"Eviscerada" and "madurada" should be "evisceradas" and "maduradas"; both adjectives must refer to "anchoas".

There are alternatives here. "Headless" is quite commonly used instead of "headed", and "eviscerated" can be used instead of "gutted", but "headed and gutted" (H & G) is a very common term in the fish trade, so I would stay with that.

The "panza" is called the belly of the fish in English. It is not just a redundant repetition of "eviscerada". It means that as well as removing the guts of the fish, they cut off a small amount of flesh at the bottom of the belly, thereby also removing the ventral fin. And "cola" simply means "tail".

"Matured" can certainly be said for "madurada[s]", but "cured" is much more usual. They really mean the same thing. In English "matured" is normally used for anchovies cured in barrels.

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 10:10
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 35
Grading comment
MUCHAS GRACIAS!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Claudia Luque Bedregal: I've recently translated some material about a heading, gutting, tailing and packing machine to can sardines ;)
4 hrs
  -> That sounds like fun! Many thanks, Claudia :)

agree  evelyn beltrán: Sardines in a glass jar are the best...
5 hrs
  -> In this part of Spain we have them like that, "en escabeche" (with oil, vinegar and herbs. They're great! Thanks, Evelyn!

agree  philgoddard: What a good, well thought-out answer.
7 hrs
  -> Thank you very much, Phil!
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Changes made by editors
Feb 28, 2012 - Changes made by Charles Davis:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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