fresón

English translation: big/large strawberry

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:fresón
English translation:big/large strawberry
Entered by: Eileen Brophy
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12:32 Jun 23, 2018
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Marketing - Food & Drink / agriculture
Spanish term or phrase: fresón
When I look online I only find "strawberry" for both "fresa" and "fresón."
Is there a specific name to distinguish the "fresón" from the smaller "fresa"
in English?

Thank you for any help
Eileen Brophy
Spain
Local time: 05:48
large strawberry
Explanation:
This is all you can do, in my opinion. "Fresa" and "fresón" is the same fruit and the only difference is size. Well, also flavour: an honest translation would be "fresa: small, tasty strawberries" and "fresón: large, bland strawberries", but the client might not appreciate that. In theory "fresas" are sometimes supposed to be wild strawberries, but that's very unlikely to be the case here and I don't think you should put that for "fresa"; they're almost certainly cultivated too.

Depending on the format you will probably want to put either "large strawberries" or "strawberries (large)".

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Note added at 3 hrs (2018-06-23 16:31:45 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Hi Eileen. To me, "jumbo" makes it sound as though they're really huge. I think in Europe we'd probably go for something more descriptive. Fresones are not always very big, after all. Although I don't think there's an official size limit distinguishing "fresa" from "fresón", four sizes are recognised: pequeña (<25 mm), mediana, grande and extragrande (>40 mm) ( http://www.infoagro.com/documentos/el_cultivo_fresa.asp ), and from what I've just read here: http://www.juntadeandalucia.es/agriculturaypesca/observatori... it seems European consumers don't actually want them huge. So I wouldn't use "jumbo".
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 05:48
Grading comment
As I commented Charles, I have used "Big" rather than "Large" in this context. Thank you very much for your help
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4large strawberry
Charles Davis


  

Answers


32 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
large strawberry


Explanation:
This is all you can do, in my opinion. "Fresa" and "fresón" is the same fruit and the only difference is size. Well, also flavour: an honest translation would be "fresa: small, tasty strawberries" and "fresón: large, bland strawberries", but the client might not appreciate that. In theory "fresas" are sometimes supposed to be wild strawberries, but that's very unlikely to be the case here and I don't think you should put that for "fresa"; they're almost certainly cultivated too.

Depending on the format you will probably want to put either "large strawberries" or "strawberries (large)".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2018-06-23 16:31:45 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Hi Eileen. To me, "jumbo" makes it sound as though they're really huge. I think in Europe we'd probably go for something more descriptive. Fresones are not always very big, after all. Although I don't think there's an official size limit distinguishing "fresa" from "fresón", four sizes are recognised: pequeña (<25 mm), mediana, grande and extragrande (>40 mm) ( http://www.infoagro.com/documentos/el_cultivo_fresa.asp ), and from what I've just read here: http://www.juntadeandalucia.es/agriculturaypesca/observatori... it seems European consumers don't actually want them huge. So I wouldn't use "jumbo".

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 05:48
Does not meet criteria
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 95
Grading comment
As I commented Charles, I have used "Big" rather than "Large" in this context. Thank you very much for your help
Notes to answerer
Asker: Charles, I found Jumbo strawberries on a US website, but I don't know if that would be accepted in European countries...

Asker: No, Charles, after reading that they are the fruit that contain most herbicide I don't buy them either. I will go for big then, thanks.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Marie Wilson: Yes, and I live in the middle of strawberry paradise. // Would be delightful if not for the chemical warfare.
36 mins
  -> Ah yes, of course! Thanks, Marie :-) // I hadn't thought of that. Sounds a bit offputting!

agree  neilmac: Big but usually tasteless strawbs...
1 day 51 mins
  -> Hear, hear! Small is beautiful ;-)

agree  Mónica Hanlan
1 day 23 hrs
  -> Thanks, Mónica :-)

agree  Helena Chavarria: It's a bit like 'banana' and 'plátano'. Britons tend to think that they're different words for the same fruit.
4 days
  -> Thanks, Helena :-) They don't know what they're missing; "plátanos" are much better!
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