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mallado

English translation: medullary rays

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:mallado
English translation:medullary rays
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18:07 Feb 2, 2018
    The asker opted for community grading. The question was closed on 2018-02-06 15:54:08 based on peer agreement (or, if there were too few peer comments, asker preference.)


Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Forestry / Wood / Timber
Spanish term or phrase: mallado
Buenas tardes

Estoy intentando traducir el término "mallado" pero no lo consigo. En el diccionario aparece el término "mesh", pero creo que está más relacionado con la electrónica. En francés el equivalente es "maillure", lo que me llevó a "silver grain", pero no estoy seguro. Os dejo un poco de contexto:

"IPE

Madera de albura visible blanco amarillenta. Duramen de color pardo aceituna a pardo oscuro, a veces con finos poros. Dirección de la fibra en contrahilo siempre presente, a veces muy fuerte. Grano de fino a medio y mallado extraordinariamente fino."

Muchas gracias
rompeholas
medullary rays
Explanation:
As a natural product, the colour and grain of oak can vary from one piece to another. In addition to the warm tones and grains, some oak features unique markings called medullary rays which can add character, beauty and uniqueness to your staircase.
Medullary rays (also known as Pith Rays or Tiger Marks) are sometimes mistaken for damaged, repaired or water marked wood but are in fact a natural feature of the timber. The marks are caused by sap moving through the wood perpendicular to the rings as nutrition is transported from it’s core to the outer areas leaving silver or gold ribbons and is an important part of the tree’s growing process.

The presence of the marking,s like many things, are subjective. Far from being a defect in the wood, these markings are prized by many carpenters and customers for their traditional, high end appearance and because they are an indication of the finest oak from the prized part of the tree. Some carpenters even pride themselves on using timber with medullary rays. They are most prominent in oak which has been quarter sawn which reduces expanding, twisting and warping.

https://www.abbottwade.co.uk/2014/01/07/medullary-rays/

Most hardwoods (but not softwoods) have ribbons of parenchyma cells that carry nutrients laterally through the bole. Technically, to be entirely correct, "medullary rays" are those rays that start at the pith of a tree and go outwards, but in normal use the term refers to all rays whether or not they start at the pith.

In some woods such as oak and lacewood the rays are very pronounced and in other woods they are barely discernable. They are what cause the "ray flake" figure in quartersawn planks.

http://www.hobbithouseinc.com/personal/woodpics/_rays.htm

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Note added at 38 mins (2018-02-02 18:46:17 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Chapa de madera mallada o rameada. ¿Serían buenos los términos "rift-cut veneer" y "flat-cut veneer" para traducir esto? Las voces ocurren en un catálogo de puertas, así a secas, debajo de las fotos de las vetas de las maderas en cuestión - cerezo o roble mallado o rameado

https://forum.wordreference.com/threads/chapa-de-madera-mall...

RIFT SAWN
Most expensive, least common
Rift sawn wood can be manufactured either as a compliment to quarter sawn lumber or logs can be cut specifically as rift sawn. In rift sawn lumber the annual rings are typically between 30-60 degrees, with 45 degrees being optimum. Manufactured by milling perpendicular to the log’s growth rings producing a linear grain pattern with no flecking. This method produces the most waste, increasing the cost of this lumber. Rift sawn lumber is very dimensionally stable and has a unique linear appearance.

http://www.hardwooddistributors.org/blog/postings/what-is-th...

After further research I've noticed that 'mallado' is often used to refer to a type of cut (rift sawn), though in this case, I think the word is used to describe the rays in the wood.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 54 mins (2018-02-02 19:02:54 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The following question is English > French but it might help you.

https://www.proz.com/kudoz/english_to_french/materials_plast...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 hrs (2018-02-03 11:16:49 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Now I prefer 'ray fleck/flecking'! I also think that the cut is quartersawn, not rift sawn.

Trees use cellular structures called medullary rays to transport sap for water and nutrients. They also transport terpenes, which help fight against disease and insect infestations, and during this process heartwood is created from sapwood. Medullary rays radiate out from the pith, and run like ribbons perpendicular to the grain. When quartersawn, these rays are exposed, and while all trees have medullary rays, only certain species will display them in obvious fashion. The exposed medullary rays produce a kind of figure in the wood, and are commonly called ray fleck.

The character and intensity of flecking in white oak can vary significantly even among a single bundle of lumber. But you can stack the cards in your favor when picking your boards at the lumberyard by looking at the end grain. The more perfectly perpendicular the grain, the more fleck you’re likely to end up with. Because the medullary rays run radially, the closer to a perfect 90 degrees a board is cut, the more the rays will be exposed and the more flecking you will see. You can find ray fleck in boards that are cut at angles as low as 75 degrees, which is technically where rift sawn ends and quarter sawn begins, but in my experience, they start to disappear altogether at any angle below that point, or at best the flecks are short, skinny and straight and run in a consistent direction, instead of the big, fat, random and wandering ray fleck you will see in a perfectly quartersawn board. It’s in your interest to take a little extra time at the lumberyard to pick boards that are as close to perfectly quartersawn as possible if intense flecking is what you’re after.

https://thewoodenoracle.wordpress.com/2013/05/23/maximizing-...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 19 hrs (2018-02-03 14:06:44 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Thanks for the article. I enjoyed reading it!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 hrs (2018-02-03 14:08:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It also explained why I was confused by 'rift sawn' and 'quartersawn'.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 hrs (2018-02-03 14:21:23 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Radial plane is any plane whose surface parallels the stem axis and passes through the pith (in practice often referred to as “quarter sawn” surface). It exposes the longitudinal expression of the axially orientated tissues (vessels, axial parenchyma, fibers) transected at a 90° angle by bands of the horizontally oriented rays. However, because of slight irregularities in the structure (rays “curve” around large pores and often do not run in perfectly straight radial lines), exposure of the rays may be intermittent. The distinctive appearance of larger rays as dark bands (for instance in maple and black cherry) on a radial surface is called „ray fleck“. The term “silver grain” is often used with reference to the silvery sheen of very large rays (for instance oak) due to the reflection of incident light. Growth ring boundaries appear as nearly parallel axial/vertical lines in radial view.

ftp://delta-intkey.com/citesw/en/intro.htm
Selected response from:

Helena Chavarria
Spain
Local time: 19:59
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +2medullary rays
Helena Chavarria
Summary of reference entries provided
definición
P Forgas
I think you're right
Helena Chavarria

Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


28 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
medullary rays


Explanation:
As a natural product, the colour and grain of oak can vary from one piece to another. In addition to the warm tones and grains, some oak features unique markings called medullary rays which can add character, beauty and uniqueness to your staircase.
Medullary rays (also known as Pith Rays or Tiger Marks) are sometimes mistaken for damaged, repaired or water marked wood but are in fact a natural feature of the timber. The marks are caused by sap moving through the wood perpendicular to the rings as nutrition is transported from it’s core to the outer areas leaving silver or gold ribbons and is an important part of the tree’s growing process.

The presence of the marking,s like many things, are subjective. Far from being a defect in the wood, these markings are prized by many carpenters and customers for their traditional, high end appearance and because they are an indication of the finest oak from the prized part of the tree. Some carpenters even pride themselves on using timber with medullary rays. They are most prominent in oak which has been quarter sawn which reduces expanding, twisting and warping.

https://www.abbottwade.co.uk/2014/01/07/medullary-rays/

Most hardwoods (but not softwoods) have ribbons of parenchyma cells that carry nutrients laterally through the bole. Technically, to be entirely correct, "medullary rays" are those rays that start at the pith of a tree and go outwards, but in normal use the term refers to all rays whether or not they start at the pith.

In some woods such as oak and lacewood the rays are very pronounced and in other woods they are barely discernable. They are what cause the "ray flake" figure in quartersawn planks.

http://www.hobbithouseinc.com/personal/woodpics/_rays.htm

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 38 mins (2018-02-02 18:46:17 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Chapa de madera mallada o rameada. ¿Serían buenos los términos "rift-cut veneer" y "flat-cut veneer" para traducir esto? Las voces ocurren en un catálogo de puertas, así a secas, debajo de las fotos de las vetas de las maderas en cuestión - cerezo o roble mallado o rameado

https://forum.wordreference.com/threads/chapa-de-madera-mall...

RIFT SAWN
Most expensive, least common
Rift sawn wood can be manufactured either as a compliment to quarter sawn lumber or logs can be cut specifically as rift sawn. In rift sawn lumber the annual rings are typically between 30-60 degrees, with 45 degrees being optimum. Manufactured by milling perpendicular to the log’s growth rings producing a linear grain pattern with no flecking. This method produces the most waste, increasing the cost of this lumber. Rift sawn lumber is very dimensionally stable and has a unique linear appearance.

http://www.hardwooddistributors.org/blog/postings/what-is-th...

After further research I've noticed that 'mallado' is often used to refer to a type of cut (rift sawn), though in this case, I think the word is used to describe the rays in the wood.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 54 mins (2018-02-02 19:02:54 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The following question is English > French but it might help you.

https://www.proz.com/kudoz/english_to_french/materials_plast...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 hrs (2018-02-03 11:16:49 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Now I prefer 'ray fleck/flecking'! I also think that the cut is quartersawn, not rift sawn.

Trees use cellular structures called medullary rays to transport sap for water and nutrients. They also transport terpenes, which help fight against disease and insect infestations, and during this process heartwood is created from sapwood. Medullary rays radiate out from the pith, and run like ribbons perpendicular to the grain. When quartersawn, these rays are exposed, and while all trees have medullary rays, only certain species will display them in obvious fashion. The exposed medullary rays produce a kind of figure in the wood, and are commonly called ray fleck.

The character and intensity of flecking in white oak can vary significantly even among a single bundle of lumber. But you can stack the cards in your favor when picking your boards at the lumberyard by looking at the end grain. The more perfectly perpendicular the grain, the more fleck you’re likely to end up with. Because the medullary rays run radially, the closer to a perfect 90 degrees a board is cut, the more the rays will be exposed and the more flecking you will see. You can find ray fleck in boards that are cut at angles as low as 75 degrees, which is technically where rift sawn ends and quarter sawn begins, but in my experience, they start to disappear altogether at any angle below that point, or at best the flecks are short, skinny and straight and run in a consistent direction, instead of the big, fat, random and wandering ray fleck you will see in a perfectly quartersawn board. It’s in your interest to take a little extra time at the lumberyard to pick boards that are as close to perfectly quartersawn as possible if intense flecking is what you’re after.

https://thewoodenoracle.wordpress.com/2013/05/23/maximizing-...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 19 hrs (2018-02-03 14:06:44 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Thanks for the article. I enjoyed reading it!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 hrs (2018-02-03 14:08:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It also explained why I was confused by 'rift sawn' and 'quartersawn'.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 hrs (2018-02-03 14:21:23 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Radial plane is any plane whose surface parallels the stem axis and passes through the pith (in practice often referred to as “quarter sawn” surface). It exposes the longitudinal expression of the axially orientated tissues (vessels, axial parenchyma, fibers) transected at a 90° angle by bands of the horizontally oriented rays. However, because of slight irregularities in the structure (rays “curve” around large pores and often do not run in perfectly straight radial lines), exposure of the rays may be intermittent. The distinctive appearance of larger rays as dark bands (for instance in maple and black cherry) on a radial surface is called „ray fleck“. The term “silver grain” is often used with reference to the silvery sheen of very large rays (for instance oak) due to the reflection of incident light. Growth ring boundaries appear as nearly parallel axial/vertical lines in radial view.

ftp://delta-intkey.com/citesw/en/intro.htm

Helena Chavarria
Spain
Local time: 19:59
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
Notes to answerer
Asker: You're right, both silver grain and ray fleck mean the same. Have a look at the website in which I found this text: '“silver grain” is an archaic term for ray fleck'. Source: https://arivinghome.wordpress.com/tag/the-name-of-the-grain/


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  JohnMcDove
22 hrs
  -> Thank you, John :-)

agree  P Forgas
22 hrs
  -> Thank you very much :-)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Reference comments


11 mins peer agreement (net): +1
Reference: definición

Reference information:
Atlas de maderas tropicales de America Latina - Page 29

3. —. DESCRIPCIÓN. DE. LA. MADERA. ALBURA : color y espesor medio. DURAMEN • Color • Fibra (dirección general de las fibras) - recta - contrahilo ligero y/o ocasional - contrahilo fuerte y/o frecuente • Grano (impresión visual dada por el volumen y la disposición de los poros) - grueso - medio - fino • Mallado (aspecto producido por la presencia de radios sobre la cara de una madera cuarteada) - fino - medio - fuerte.


    https://books.google.com.br/books?isbn=2876146126
P Forgas
Brazil
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Spanish
Note to reference poster
Asker: Thanks P Forgas


Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  JohnMcDove
22 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

20 mins peer agreement (net): +1
Reference: I think you're right

Reference information:
Definition of silver grain
: the lines or figures of the medullary rays on various woods (such as oak or bird's-eye maple) in longitudinal or tangential sections

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/silver grain

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 23 mins (2018-02-02 18:31:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Medullary rays are cellular structures found in some species of wood. They appear as radial planar structures, perpendicular to the growth rings, which are visible to the naked eye. In a transverse section they appear as radiating lines from the centre of the log. In an axial section they may appear as a variety of transverse markings, depending on how close the section is to the plane of the ray. In a tangential section they may be hard to see at all.

They are formed by the activity of fascicular cambium. During the process of the division of cambium, the cambium cuts out cells on both the outer and inner side. These cells are parenchymatous. Most of these cells transform into xylem and phloem. But certain cells don't transform into xylem and phloem and remain as such.[clarification needed] These cells cut out by the cambium towards the periphery are phloem parenchyma while those towards the pith are xylem parenchyma. Both of these cells together work as secondary medullary rays.

These medullary or pith rays are essential for the radial conduction of the water, minerals and other organic substances.They transport the substances from centre to periphery

These rays are also known as vascular rays or pith rays.

In this context, the term refers to radial sheets or ribbons extending vertically through the tree across and perpendicular to the growth rings. Also called pith rays or wood rays, these formations of primarily parenchyma cells allow the radial transport of sap and are essential in the process of tylosis.

In quartersawn material, where the wood is cut into boards with the growth rings roughly perpendicular to the face of the board, the medullary rays often produce beautiful figure such as silver grain, medullary spots, pith flecks, etc.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medullary_ray_(botany)

Helena Chavarria
Spain
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Note to reference poster
Asker: According to the definitions provided by P Forgas and the definition I found in this website, I think "silver grain" might be the right term. Text: "THE GRAIN The word "grain" is often misapplied and misunderstood. Such terms as "coarse grained" or "fine grained" actually refer to the texture of the surface and not to the grain. "Silver grain" is used to describe the prominent ray figure on quartered oak". Source: https://myslide.es/documents/world-woods-in-colour-586e3250a975c.html

Asker: And your definition as well


Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  JohnMcDove
22 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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Feb 2 - Changes made by JohnMcDove:
Language pairEnglish to Spanish » Spanish to English


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