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el mundo anglo-sajón

English translation: English-speaking world

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:el mundo anglo-sajón
English translation:English-speaking world
Entered by: Margarita Ezquerra (Smart Translators, S.L.)
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10:59 Nov 12, 2008
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
Spanish term or phrase: el mundo anglo-sajón
"el mundo anglo-sajón" and "los anglo sajones" are terms that I hear frequently in Spain, but not ones that I am used to hearing much in the UK - except in two contexts: history and the Thatcher-style of running an economy.

Wikipedia says "In contemporary usage, Anglo-Saxon can be used in various contexts to mean people predominently descended from the English ethnic group, in England as well as other Anglophone countries. This usage is restricted to certain contexts in Anglophone cultures, but this term and its direct translations are commonly used in other languages"

It seems that my Spanish/Catalan pals understand it as UK, USA and Australia primarily... But not, curiously, German

Wikipedia also says this:

"Outside Anglophone countries, both in Europe and in the rest of the world, the term "Anglo-Saxon" and its direct translations are used to refer to the Anglophone peoples and societies of Britain, the United States, and other countries such as Australia, Canada and New Zealand. The term can be used in a variety of contexts, often to identify the English-speaking world's distinctive language, culture, technology, wealth, markets, economy, and legal systems. Local variations include the French "Anglo-Saxon" and the Spanish "anglosajón".

As with the English language use of the term, what constitutes the "Anglo-Saxon" varies from speaker to speaker. For example, in Spain, the term can also include Ireland and its peoples and cultures."

The Catalan dictionary says:
"2 1 m. i f. [LC] Individu de qualsevol dels pobles de cultura britànica.
2 2 adj. [LC] Relatiu o pertanyent als pobles de cultura britànica. "

I guess there is not good UK-English term that succintly and more naturally translates "el mundo anglo-sajón" than by using "Anglo-Saxon", which is something I would not describe myself as, really (despite being British British)

Any thoughts?
Thanks
Comunican
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:24
English-speaking world
Explanation:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_language

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 13 minutos (2008-11-12 11:13:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Anglo-Saxon economy (economic model) - Wikipedia, the free ... - [ Traducir esta página ]The term Anglo-Saxon to denote the English-speaking world originated from the standard French idea of le monde anglo-saxon [3]. ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglo-Saxon_economy - 41k - En caché - Páginas similares
Selected response from:

Margarita Ezquerra (Smart Translators, S.L.)
Spain
Local time: 18:24
Grading comment
Thanks everyone - an interesting set of responses...
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +9English-speaking world
Margarita Ezquerra (Smart Translators, S.L.)
4 +2Anglo-Saxon
Karen Vincent-Jones
5English speaking countriesTraduint
4The Anglo-Saxon World
Alice Bootman
4English-speaking peoples
John Rawlins
Summary of reference entries provided
Hi ComunicanVistalba

Discussion entries: 10





  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +9
English-speaking world


Explanation:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_language

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 13 minutos (2008-11-12 11:13:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Anglo-Saxon economy (economic model) - Wikipedia, the free ... - [ Traducir esta página ]The term Anglo-Saxon to denote the English-speaking world originated from the standard French idea of le monde anglo-saxon [3]. ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglo-Saxon_economy - 41k - En caché - Páginas similares

Margarita Ezquerra (Smart Translators, S.L.)
Spain
Local time: 18:24
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 144
Grading comment
Thanks everyone - an interesting set of responses...
Notes to answerer
Asker: sí!! Eso es... Así de fácil - Me embrollo demasiado de vez en cuando y la solución es más sencilla.... Gracias Marga, abrazos C


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nikki Graham
1 min
  -> Gracias Nikki

agree  Grace Horsley
4 mins
  -> Gracias Grace

agree  S Ben Price
9 mins
  -> Gracias Ben

agree  Vistalba
10 mins
  -> Gracias Vistalba

neutral  moken: Hi Marga. This is what I thought too, but I understand C's doubts: I'm not sure that we'd think of non-industrialised English-speaking countries or those with white minorities when we say "mundo anglosajón" in Spain, but I can't find a better alternative.
10 mins
  -> Entiendo perfectamente tus dudas!

agree  Donatella Talpo: ok
40 mins
  -> Gracias Donatella

agree  Tatty
1 hr
  -> Gracias Tatty

agree  raptisi
2 hrs
  -> Gracias raptisi

agree  Henry Hinds
2 hrs
  -> Gracias Henry

agree  De Novi
5 hrs
  -> Gracias Zanne
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21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Anglo-Saxon


Explanation:
This is a tricky one- it's used mainly, as you say, by 'other' Europeans, and not by the British or the Americans themselves. But it's becoming increasingly common, so I guess we will just have to get used to being labelled, and stop thinking of ourselves as the norm which doesn't need any label. In some contexts you could use 'English-speaking' or 'Anglophone', or, in a US context, possibly WASP.


    Reference: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/banksandfina...
    Reference: http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2008/oct/16/gordonbrown-e...
Karen Vincent-Jones
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:24
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Cinnamon Nolan: WASP in the US is "White Anglo-saxon Protestant", so it is NOT equivalent to just Anglo-saxon.
23 mins

agree  Carlos Segura: You are right, often a label used by the "others", or a reference by Brits of this label (sometimes you can hear the barricades going up as both side speak it). Whether the label is fair, accurate, or not, the literal "Anglo-Saxon" is, I think, right.
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Carlos

agree  jude dabo
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Jude69
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
English-speaking peoples


Explanation:
Churchill may have coined this phrase with his series of history books published after WW2. I believe his phrase it still works very well for describing the UK, the Irish Republic, the US, and the former British dominions and some colonies.

The problem with the 'English-speaking world' is that it may also include the many millions of people from clearly non-Anglo-Saxon cultures who happen to use English everyday.

John Rawlins
Spain
Local time: 18:24
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 11
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
English speaking countries


Explanation:
Estoy de acuerdo que en español y los contextos que mencionas se usa el término anglosajón, sobretodo en español. Sin embargo, en inglés, por propia experiencia, diría que se usa más "English Speaking Countries".


Traduint
Spain
Local time: 18:24
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in CatalanCatalan, Native in SpanishSpanish
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
The Anglo-Saxon World


Explanation:
While it may seem redundant, I've always heard it like this in English. And, in my culture (southern US), the term refers to the parts of the world (including geographical areas as well as sectors, such as finance) that is dominated/controlled by wealthy white people.
There are many interesting suggestions and observations here. Good question!

Alice Bootman
United States
Local time: 10:24
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
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Reference comments


21 mins
Reference: Hi Comunican

Reference information:
I found this in a forum: Anglo-Saxon originally referred to two Germanic tribes from the north sea coast of Germany, the Angles and the Saxons. It is also a synonym for the English people in general and any of the peoples who live in the colonies they founded: U.S. , Canada, Australia etc.

Broadly speaking, Anglo-Saxon , the way some Americans use it, even includes the Scandinavians, the Celtic Scots, Irish and Welsh and even the French and French Huegonauts.

(From:http://www.antimoon.com/forum/t1345.htm)


    Reference: http://bubl.ac.uk/docs/bibliog/biggam/
    Reference: http://www.great-britain.co.uk/history/ang-sax.htm
Vistalba
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
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Changes made by editors
Nov 25, 2008 - Changes made by Margarita Ezquerra (Smart Translators, S.L.):
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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