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excesos en el lenguaje

English translation: inappropriate language

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:excesos en el lenguaje
English translation:inappropriate language
Entered by: AllegroTrans
Options:
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- Include in personal glossary

01:00 Feb 2, 2012
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
Spanish term or phrase: excesos en el lenguaje
This is in a document establishing internal policies for admittance of union organizers into a workplace. "Excesos en el lenguaje" appears to be a fairly common set phrase, but I'm having a hard time getting a bead on what it actually encompasses.

"El ingreso de que trata el presente Procedimiento debe llevarse a cabo pacíficamente conforme lo establecen los referidos Convenios de la OIT, y absteniéndose además de excesos en el lenguaje."
Kathryn Litherland
United States
Local time: 01:41
inappropriate language
Explanation:
A very "PC" way of sdaying it, widely used

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Note added at 11 hrs (2012-02-02 12:34:21 GMT)
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Inappropriate language?
There's always been a debate about what is and isn't acceptable on TV news programmes, and now that we have blogs, forums and podcasts it's only getting more ...
www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/theeditors/2006/09/inappropriate... - Cached
[PDF]
APPROPRIATE / INAPPROPRIATE LANGUAGE
Adobe PDF
FREEDOM OF INFORMATION REQUEST Request Number: F-2009-03060 Keyword: Human Resources Subject: APPROPRIATE / INAPPROPRIATE LANGUAGE Request and Answer: Question Under ...
www.psni.police.uk/appropriate_inappropriate_language.pdf
inappropriate: Definition, Synonyms from Answers.com
inappropriate adj. Unsuitable or improper. inappropriately in ' appro ' priately adv ... If you are unable to view some languages clearly, click here. To select your ...
www.answers.com/topic/inappropriate - Cached
Selected response from:

AllegroTrans
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:41
Grading comment
I like the vagueness of this one. Charles' comments in the reference note are very helpful also!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3inappropriate language
AllegroTrans
3 +4profanities
Richard Hill
4 +2using swear words / swearing
Sarah FRUTOS BAMBERRY
3 +3excessive language
TranslatorJames
4expletivesJudyK
4excess foul language
eski
4bad language/foul language
Andrew Nimmo
3always maintaining decorum in the choice of wordsBubo Coromandus
3excess in language
Erika Di Dio
Summary of reference entries provided
"exceso" and excess
Charles Davis

  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
bad language/foul language


Explanation:
Although bad language would appear to have a wide meaning, I think in the context you mention it would be clear that it would refer to swearing and the like; foul language would also be another viable option.

Andrew Nimmo
Switzerland
Local time: 07:41
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
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17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
excessive language


Explanation:
I am fairly sure that the phrase is more or less literal.

It simply means 'excessive language'. Please see the definitions below.


    Reference: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/excessive
    Reference: http://www.audioenglish.net/dictionary/excessive.htm
TranslatorJames
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:41
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Steven Huddleston
8 mins

agree  Ruth Ramsey: Yes, I would say this as I can't imagine that they would use bad language in such a procedure.
4 days

agree  MollyRose: This is what it sounds like to me, too, because hopefully they should already know not to use foul language. Avoid haranguing, berating, excessive verbiage.
4 days
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
profanities


Explanation:
Perhaps!

Profanity also known as swearing, cursing, foul speech, and cussing, is a show of disrespect, a desecration or debasement of someone or something, or just the act of expressing intense emotions. Profanity can take the form of words, expressions, gestures, or other social behaviors that are socially constructed or interpreted as insulting, rude, vulgar, obscene, obnoxious, foul, desecrating or other forms.[1]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Profanity

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Note added at 15 mins (2012-02-02 01:16:15 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I stick by my original answer but offer these references in case you feel they better fit your context:

Periphrasis
Definition:
The term ‘periphrasis’ refers to the use of **excessive language** and surplus words to convey a meaning that could otherwise be conveyed with fewer words and in more direct a manner. The use of this literary device can be to embellish a sentence, to create a grander effect, to beat around the bush and to draw attention away from the crux of the message being conveyed.
Example:
Instead of simply saying “I am displeased with your behavior”, one can say, “the manner in which you have conducted yourself in my presence of late has caused me to feel uncomfortable and has resulted in my feeling disgruntled and disappointed with you”.
Gossip and Nonsense: Excessive Language in Renaissance France

Dr Emily Butterworth is Co-Investigator on this AHRC-funded project, which will examine the more demotic and marginal aspects of Renaissance copiousness. She is collaborating with Dr Hugh Roberts (Exeter), and will work on the strand on gossip and its uses and representations in literature.
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/ahri/projects/gossip.aspx

non•sense
n.
1. Words or signs having no intelligible meaning: a message that was nonsense until decoded.
2. Subject matter, behavior, or language that is foolish or absurd.
3. Extravagant foolishness or frivolity: a clown's exuberant nonsense.
4. Matter of little or no importance or usefulness: a chatty letter full of gossip and nonsense.
5. Insolent talk or behavior; impudence: wouldn't take any nonsense from the children.
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/nonsense

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2012-02-02 03:37:27 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

AS AN AFTER THOUGHT, all the above related terms, 'excessive language' and 'profanities'/'foul language', are right, so it depends on what you reckon from your text and if there were any doubt that it's not referring to the unionists' liking for a good cuss-word, then if you say 'excessive language', although it may be vaguer, it's also broader; broad enough to include gossip, nonsense, surplus and unnecessary words and, of course %#&(´¿{.-{+* :)

Richard Hill
Mexico
Local time: 00:41
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 36

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gallagy: yeah, way I read it
4 mins
  -> Thanks Gallagy

agree  Lydia De Jorge
18 mins
  -> Thanks, Lydia

agree  Eliza Ariadni Kalfa
10 hrs
  -> Thanks, Eliza

agree  Emiliano Pantoja
11 hrs
  -> Thanks, Emiliano
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
excess foul language


Explanation:
www.minecraftforum.net/.../901008-worlds-apar... - Traducir esta página
Haz hecho público que te gusta. Deshacer
1 Jan 2012 – Refrain from excess foul language. 8. No stealing. 9. Cut all of the tree down when gathering logs. Replace cut trees with saplings (we value an ...


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs (2012-02-02 07:40:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

eski :))

eski
Mexico
Local time: 00:41
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 12
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
always maintaining decorum in the choice of words


Explanation:
in wide sense, generally keeping one's language nice and not likely to cause offence

Bubo Coromandus
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 310
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
using swear words / swearing


Explanation:
Another option

Sarah FRUTOS BAMBERRY
Spain
Local time: 07:41
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  peninsular
51 mins

agree  Letredenoblesse
1 hr
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11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
excess in language


Explanation:
a possibility

Erika Di Dio
Local time: 07:41
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
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11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
inappropriate language


Explanation:
A very "PC" way of sdaying it, widely used

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 hrs (2012-02-02 12:34:21 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Inappropriate language?
There's always been a debate about what is and isn't acceptable on TV news programmes, and now that we have blogs, forums and podcasts it's only getting more ...
www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/theeditors/2006/09/inappropriate... - Cached
[PDF]
APPROPRIATE / INAPPROPRIATE LANGUAGE
Adobe PDF
FREEDOM OF INFORMATION REQUEST Request Number: F-2009-03060 Keyword: Human Resources Subject: APPROPRIATE / INAPPROPRIATE LANGUAGE Request and Answer: Question Under ...
www.psni.police.uk/appropriate_inappropriate_language.pdf
inappropriate: Definition, Synonyms from Answers.com
inappropriate adj. Unsuitable or improper. inappropriately in ' appro ' priately adv ... If you are unable to view some languages clearly, click here. To select your ...
www.answers.com/topic/inappropriate - Cached

AllegroTrans
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:41
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 36
Grading comment
I like the vagueness of this one. Charles' comments in the reference note are very helpful also!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  James A. Walsh
10 mins
  -> thanks JW

agree  Charles Davis: By coincidence you posted this just as I was about to do the same. I agree entirely, and shall discreetly withdraw my answer (I proposed "offensive language" as a possible alternative).
15 mins
  -> magnanimity appreciated, thanks!

agree  Helena Chavarria: Yes, I was going to post "offensive language" but I thought there were enough suggestions already without me adding another one!
1 hr
  -> thanks
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13 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
expletives


Explanation:
another option that comes to mind

JudyK
Local time: 06:41
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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Reference comments


11 hrs
Reference: "exceso" and excess

Reference information:
Having withdrawn my answer ("inappropriate/offensive language") on finding that AllegroTrans had just suggested the same phrase, may I offer two considerations in support of it.

First, I think anything with "excess" or "excessive" here is a mistranslation. "Excessive language" implies using too many words. "Exceso" here has one of the following two senses, as defined in the DRAE:

"2. m. Cosa que sale en cualquier línea de los límites de lo ordinario o de lo lícito [...]
4. m. Abuso, delito o crimen. U. m. en pl."
http://buscon.rae.es/draeI/SrvltGUIBusUsual?TIPO_HTML=2&TIPO...

It therefore means language beyond the bounds of decency or acceptability.

Second, although it probably refers primarily to profanity, it is not necessarily confined to that. Language can be offensive and unacceptable without actually involving swearing. Moreover, in this context it should not be expressed like that anyway. We should emulate that element of euphemism or indirectness in the original (PC, as AllegroTrans calls it).

Here is an amusing and, I think, telling reference I posted in my answer:

"Whoever was manning Chrysler's official Twitter account on Wednesday morning apparently sucked down too much #TigerBlood before work. "I find it ironic that Detroit is known as the #motorcity and yet no one here knows how to fucking drive," the brand tweeted, much to the surprise of its nearly 8,000 followers [...] Chrysler later apologized, saying: "Chrysler Group and its brands do not tolerate inappropriate language or behavior, and apologize to anyone who may have been offended by this communication."
http://www.adweek.com/adfreak/chrysler-throws-down-f-bomb-tw...

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Note added at 13 hrs (2012-02-02 14:07:24 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It's not inconceivable to have a rule against talking too much at work, but it is inconceivable (in my opinion) that this should be called "excesos en el lenguaje".

Charles Davis
Spain
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 271
Note to reference poster
Asker: Thanks, Charles. Very well thought-out and explained.

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Changes made by editors
Feb 11, 2012 - Changes made by AllegroTrans:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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