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que entra el manjar

English translation: a feast for your eyes

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18:55 Nov 28, 2008
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - History / Gender and Religion
Spanish term or phrase: que entra el manjar
SPAIN: No idea what this means, something like "here comes trouble" perhaps?
"Entre todas las expresiones al uso, avisos o consejos destinados al varón de aquellos días, ninguna, en mi opinión, tan clarificadora como la que utilizara el agustino Malon de Echaide a fines del Quinientos, que retomo: “Atención, pecadores, ***que entra el manjar***, mirad que viene una mujer..."
neilmac
Spain
Local time: 03:18
English translation:a feast for your eyes
Explanation:
Hi Nil,

How about this?

Behold, sinners, a feast for your eyes, a woman arriveth...

Or something like that.

Not something you'd get away with easily nowadays!

Cheers,

Álvaro :O)

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Note added at 1 hr (2008-11-28 20:19:47 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Thanks Neil!

Actually though, re-reading the text more clearly, this seems to be spoken in way of warning, so I wouldn't use "Behold" and perhaps avoid the prompting implied by "your" eyes.

I think you could still keep the core feast/eyes idea, but I think you'll need to reword it
Beware sinners, a feast for the eyes...
Abstain from feasting your eyes sinners, a woman...

Bit tricky for me, but sure you'll find a way. :O)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2008-11-28 20:21:50 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

That clearly should read closely. I'm starting to make a mess of it, aren't I... :OD

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 days42 mins (2008-12-01 19:37:58 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Don't ask me then!

Forbidden fruit = fruto prohibido as far as I'm aware, no immediate association that I know of.

Cheers Neil! ;O)
Selected response from:

moken
Local time: 02:18
Grading comment
I wanted to know if "manjar" is used as "forbidden fruit" but can't find any Spanish friends who have read the Bible in enough depth to give me a solid answer. Thanks to everyone for helping with this :-)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +8a feast for your eyes
moken
3 +4Literally: food
Jackie Bowman
3 +1beware the temptations of the flesh
Carol Gullidge
4that comes a beautiful womanWashington Molina
4here comes the temptation
Remy Arce
3the near occasion of sinJessica Agullo


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Literally: food


Explanation:
More figuratively, something like "here comes the dish" (which kind of works in English)

Jackie Bowman
Local time: 21:18
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christine Walsh: Nice one!
2 mins
  -> Cheers.

agree  Carol Gullidge: "here comes the dish of the day" could work :O)
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Carol. I got to the food option first, but I think Alvaro has bested me on this one.

agree  Richard Boulter: 'The Dish!!' Yes, very idiomatic, and a direct translation, to boot. Or 'here comes Beautiful Trouble', expanding on what NeilMac and Chriswa agreed. This has the admonitory quality of the great Preachers warning to his following.
21 hrs

agree  Monica Alves: I think you've got it. It fits perfectly with the 'spirit' of the text (author).
1 day3 hrs
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14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
here comes the temptation


Explanation:
in this context

Remy Arce
United States
Local time: 21:18
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 8
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3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
that comes a beautiful woman


Explanation:
.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 mins (2008-11-28 19:11:27 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

manjar means something good to eat and in this case is refering to a beautiful woman that has just came in, it is like we are going to eat something good,(woman). we say that in my country.


Washington Molina
Dominican Republic
Local time: 21:18
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
beware the temptations of the flesh


Explanation:
Behold, yield not to the temptations of the flesh! [[Gosh, look everybody, here comes a woman!]]

Sorry, couldn't resist that last bit, but, seriously, it could be something like this for a monk of that time, in the context of dire warnings to the wayward youth of the day

Carol Gullidge
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:18
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 76

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  franglish: "Beware, here comes temptation in the flesh". Very biblical!
9 hrs
  -> thanks franglish, and I like your subtle improvement! You could follow it with st like: Watch out, something tasty on the horizon! (on a less biblical note!)
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
the near occasion of sin


Explanation:
what they used to tell young boys to avoid in catholic school - any situation in which a woman might be suggestible....just a thought as an alternative possibility

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 hrs (2008-11-29 02:46:44 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

perhaps prefaced by "watch out for...."


    Reference: http://catholicism.about.com/od/beliefsteachings/f/Occasion_...
Jessica Agullo
United States
Local time: 21:18
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +8
a feast for your eyes


Explanation:
Hi Nil,

How about this?

Behold, sinners, a feast for your eyes, a woman arriveth...

Or something like that.

Not something you'd get away with easily nowadays!

Cheers,

Álvaro :O)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2008-11-28 20:19:47 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Thanks Neil!

Actually though, re-reading the text more clearly, this seems to be spoken in way of warning, so I wouldn't use "Behold" and perhaps avoid the prompting implied by "your" eyes.

I think you could still keep the core feast/eyes idea, but I think you'll need to reword it
Beware sinners, a feast for the eyes...
Abstain from feasting your eyes sinners, a woman...

Bit tricky for me, but sure you'll find a way. :O)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2008-11-28 20:21:50 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

That clearly should read closely. I'm starting to make a mess of it, aren't I... :OD

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 days42 mins (2008-12-01 19:37:58 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Don't ask me then!

Forbidden fruit = fruto prohibido as far as I'm aware, no immediate association that I know of.

Cheers Neil! ;O)

moken
Local time: 02:18
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in category: 60
Grading comment
I wanted to know if "manjar" is used as "forbidden fruit" but can't find any Spanish friends who have read the Bible in enough depth to give me a solid answer. Thanks to everyone for helping with this :-)
Notes to answerer
Asker: Hmm... feast your eyes... I like it :)


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christine Walsh: This one's great too, and your suggested use seems to fit in nicely with 'el varón de aquellos días'!
10 mins
  -> Thank you vm Christine. :O) :O)

agree  bcsantos
13 mins

agree  Janice Roquero
30 mins

agree  Jackie Bowman: Very good. Somehow echoes the language of the age. My "dish" pun was a bit 20th century.
33 mins
  -> Very kind of you, thanks Jackie. :O)

agree  Mónica Sauza: Nice!!!!!
54 mins
  -> Thanks Monica! :O)

agree  Carol Gullidge: yes, and I was also going to suggest "feast your eyes on that!" but see neilmac beat me to it!
1 hr
  -> Hi & thanks Carol. Trouble is, rather than an encouragement to feast, this has to be issued as a warning. "Feast your eyes" needs working on... :O)

agree  silviantonia
2 hrs

agree  xxxLia Fail
4 hrs
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